Bikie war at Melbourne prison as 300 armed inmates tear down fences separating rival gangs during riot over a smoking ban

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 – and fears grow over notorious tattooed enforcer locked in isolation

  • At least 60 prisoners at Melbourne’s Metropolitan Remand Centre rioting
  • Rioters seen covering their faces, bashing doors and carrying large sticks
  • Unrest believed to be protest against ban on smoking set to be introduced
  • Notorious Australian bikie enforcer Toby Mitchell being held at the prison 
  • Corrections Commissioner said the ‘perimeter of the prison is secure’ 
  • There have been reports of up to 100 inmates still rioting inside the prison 
  • Up to two fires are reportedly burning inside of the building 

Prison riot: Corrections Victoria regains control of Melbourne Remand Centre after police storm facility

Updated 48 minutes ago

Corrections Victoria has regained control of the Metropolitan Remand Centre in Melbourne’s west, after a 15-hour riot that started around noon yesterday ended overnight.

Heavily armed police carrying shields stormed the maximum security prison around 3:00am in a bid to quell the rioting prisoners.

In a statement, Corrections Victoria said it was a difficult operation conducted under the cover of darkness to protect prison staff, Victoria Police and prisoners.

I think it’s fair to say that I am deeply relieved that no-one was seriously hurt

Wade Noonan, Victorian Corrections Minister

Several prisoners were hurt in the riot and were treated by medical staff.

A wall was knocked down, fires were lit and windows were smashed during the violence, involving up to 300 inmates, some of who covered their faces and carried sticks.

The riot is widely believed to have been sparked by the imposition of a smoking ban which came into effect today at the remand centre at Ravenhall.

Two staff members suffered minor injuries but “these were not as a direct result of interaction with prisoners” the department said in a statement.

This morning five fire trucks returned to the centre after a fire alarm was triggered due to a minor fire at the premises.

A statement from the Justice Department said there was no risk to prisoner or staff safety.

Two ambulances were also seen going into the centre and Ambulance Victoria said one man was being treated for chest pain.

Ambulance officials could not say if it was it a prison staff member or an inmate.

About 200 staff were evacuated from the facility and all of the state’s prisons went into lockdown as a precaution.

A large number of prisoners were transferred to other facilities as authorities assessed the damage to the prison.

Corrections Victoria will hold an internal review to the handling of the riot and Victoria Police is also investigating.

Victorian Corrections Minister Wade Noonan called the incident “unacceptable” and “dangerous”.

“This behaviour will not be tolerated,” he said.

“I want to assure the Victorian people that there will be a thorough investigation into what caused this riot, how this major security breach happened and the response to it.

“This criminal behaviour will not be tolerated.

“I think it’s fair to say that I am deeply relieved that no-one was seriously hurt and this is in no small part due to the efforts of our brave men and women in Corrections Victoria and Victoria Police.”

Corrections Commissioner Jan Shuard said all prisons across the state would remain in lockdown for the time being.

She said the smoking ban probably was the reason for the riot but that the ban would still be enforced from today.

Ms Shuard could not put a dollar figure on the amount of damage inside the centre but said prison cells, windows and units were damaged.

She said work had already begun to assess the damage and make repairs.

All 802 prisoners were accounted for.

Ms Shuard said most prisoners returned to their cells on instructions from police and corrections officials.

Police used capsicum spray to subdue those refusing to cooperate.

“I would say by the time we got to the end of the exercise there was around 50 prisoners out and about that we had to bring back under control but that took a long time,” Ms Shuard said.

“The numbers decreased as the day went on.”

Most prisoners returned to cells voluntarily

Ms Shuard said they were enacting a prison recovery plan to fix the damage and secure the prisoners in their cells.

“So we’ll go to a restricted regime for a period of time and then when we assess its safe to do so we will start moving back to a normal regime but it’ll take a while,” she said.

“Those people that might be involved in these incidents don’t get the same freedom of movement that they would’ve had previously.

Every Victorian should be in no doubt that those who have acted in a criminal way will feel the full force of the law.

Daniel Andrews, Victorian Premier

“There are very restricted regimes for people that cause disruption to the prison system.”

Victoria Police Assistant Commissioner Stephen Leane said police took their time, planned the operation to regain control of the prison and then executed that plan.

“It took several hours to give the prisoners who didn’t want to be involved in any confrontation with police and corrections staff an opportunity to return to their cells.

“The vast majority of prisoners on the night returned to their cells and as they were confronted during the evening the remaining prisoners surrendered and were accounted for.”

Assistant Commissioner Leane said some of the inmates involved would probably face new criminal charges.

“I think there’s quite a few of them [who] will be thinking that they may be doing some more time than they weren’t planning on doing, yes,” he said.

Ms Shuard also promised a wide-ranging review of the handling of the incident.

“If criminal acts have occurred within our prison that would be a matter for Victoria Police to pursue any charges,” she said.

Mr Noonan praised prison staff, police and emergency workers for their “bravery in a difficult and dangerous situation”.

“I want to assure the Victorian people there will be a thorough investigation into what caused this riot, how this major security breach happened and the response to it,” he said in a statement.

Premier angry about riot, promises independent inquiry

Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews said what happened at the remand centre was “completely unacceptable” and that criminal behaviour would be investigated and prosecuted.

“We’ll investigate what went on and how it was allowed to happen,” he said.

“The circumstances around this will be fully and frankly investigated with independent oversight.

“We’ve got to learn from this and ensure that everything that can be done to avoid it ever happening again is done.”

Mr Andrews said “very significant damage was done” that will come at “considerable cost” to the Victorian taxpayer.

“Every Victorian should be in no doubt that those who have acted in a criminal way will feel the full force of the law,” he said.

Fiona Patten, the leader of the Australian Sex Party, urged the Government to overturn the smoking ban.

“It’s naive to think that when you erode the rights of an individual who has precious little freedom in the first place, they are going to just sit back and take it,” she said.

“Obviously they are going to feel further marginalised and this is exactly what has led to the trouble at the Ravenhall Maximum security facility.”

But the Premier promptly rejected that idea.

“It will not be changed. You don’t reward that sort of appalling behaviour by bringing about policy changes,” he said.

Heavily-armed police have stormed a maximum security prison after 300 criminals began rioting over a smoking ban.

Officers wearing vests, helmets and carrying shotguns charged the prison about 3:20pm in an effort to retake control, after riots broke out around 12.20pm on Tuesday. A police drone also hovered above the centre.

Inside the prison, water cannons were used to control prisoners, which included rival bikie gangs locked in a bitter war, according to Channel Seven.  

Dozens of riot police stormed the centre and continued into the night with heavily armed police monitoring the entrance at 11pm,The Herald Sun have reported.

Fires burned well into the evening inside the maximum security prison complex.

On the loose: About 300 criminals are rioting and guards have been overrun at a Melbourne prison, with more than 100 officers trying to stop 

On the loose: About 300 criminals are rioting and guards have been overrun at a Melbourne prison, with more than 100 officers trying to stop 

Dozens of riot police stormed the centre and continued well into the night with heavily armed police monitoring the entrance at 11pm

Dozens of riot police stormed the centre and continued well into the night with heavily armed police monitoring the entrance at 11pm

Corrections Commissioner Jan Shuard said ‘the perimeter of the prison is secure.’

Cheering and shouting was reportedly heard from inside the prison walls at 9.15pm.

‘We have worked very closely with our staff across the state in the implementation of this smoking ban and they have been a part of the process,’ she said.

‘This is very disappointing that this occurred today, we have done an enourmous amount of work to prepare for this, we obviously have contingency plans for all events within our prisons.’

Up to two fires are burning inside of the building and 100 inmates are yet to surrender.

Two loud bangs were heard from inside the prison around 6pm but it is unknown what was the cause, The Australian have reported.

Other reports say riot police are used tear gas inside the prison and a group of about 15 criminals forced their way into the control room in the late afternoon, according to The Age.  

Emergency services remain at the location including fire fighters and Victoria Police special operations armed with shields and helmets.

Footage by helicopters above the Metropolitan Remand Centre at Ravenhill in Melbourne’s west, shows people covering their faces, bashing doors and carrying large sticks and bats. Black smoke was also seen in the sky above the centre.

Port Phillip Prison, a mere four kilometres away, was also put into lock down following a fire at their facility, but it has since been contained.

Going in: Heavily-armed police have stormed a maximum security prison after 300 criminals began rioting over a smoking ban

Fight back: Officers wearing vests, helmets and carrying shotguns charged the prison in an effort to retake control

Cheering and shouting was reportedly heard from inside the prison walls at 9.15pm

Emergency services remain at the location including fire fighters and Victoria Police special operations armed with shields

Smoke can be seen rising from inside the prison's perimeters and up to 100 prisoners are yet to surrender

Notorious Australian bikie, former enforcer Toby Mitchell, is being held in isolation inside the facility

Notorious Australian bikie, former enforcer Toby Mitchell, is being held in isolation inside the facility

Notorious Australian bikie, former enforcer Toby Mitchell, is being held in isolation inside the facility. Mitchell, an infamous member of the Bandidos gang, has survived two shootings – one in which he was shot five times in the back.

‘Police are currently responding to a disturbance at a correctional facility on Middle Road Ravenhall just before 12.30pm,’ a Victoria Police statement read.

‘We will thoroughly review how this came about, how we responded to it and what we might need to do in the future,’

Police workers from the Critical Incident Response Team are seen outside Ravenhall Prison

Pushing back: Riot police at the Ravenhall Prison in Melbourne

Dangerous situation: Critical Incident Response team members patrol outside the centre

Dark: Smoke billows from the Ravenhall prison into the sky

‘Staff have been evacuated as a precaution. The inmates remain contained within the grounds and a number of police units are currently on scene including the Air wing.’ 

Prisoners are also reportedly lighting fires and destroying other property. 

The centre has beds to house 723 people. 

Corrections Victoria released a statement on Tuesday afternoon saying prisoners breached the ‘secure inner perimeter’ at the centre.

Ready to go: An officer with a shotgun stands outside the prison before riot police stormed the centre

Heavily armed: Officers gather outside the remand centre as prisoners riot inside

Load up: Riot police prepare to enter the prison 

Load up: Riot police prepare to enter the prison 

Riot breaks out at Ravenhall prison over smoking ban

‘All staff have been accounted for and there are no reports of staff injuries at this stage,’ the statement read.

‘Police have secured the perimeter. There is no threat to public safety.’

It is believed the riot has been caused by a Victorian government plan to ban smoking in prisons, which is set to start on Wednesday. 

‘The smoking ban will occur tomorrow,’ the Corrections Commissioner said.

However, according to reports, the canteen at Ravenhill stopped selling tobacco on June 15.

Heavy duty: A police armoured-vehicle arrives at the prison

High alert: Hundreds of officers and guards are at the scene of the Ravenhill facility in Melbourne's west

The remand centre is located in Ravenhall, west of Melbourne's CBD

Footage captured by Channel Seven shows people covering their faces, bashing doors and carrying large sticks and bats

Cocaine confession: Karmichael Hunt reveals footy party boy lifestyle

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Cocaine confession: Karmichael Hunt reveals footy party boy lifestyle. AT THE height of his alcohol and drug binge, footy star Karmichael Hunt would party for days on end without sleeping, hide cocaine in his golf bag, turn up to official team functions high, and even meet his “dealer” outside a pizza shop to score more for himself and his club mates.

Cocaine confession: Karmichael Hunt reveals footy party boy lifestyle. AT THE height of his alcohol and drug binge, footy star Karmichael Hunt would party for days on end without sleeping, hide cocaine in his golf bag, turn up to official team functions high, and even meet his “dealer” outside a pizza shop to score more for himself and his club mates.

AT THE height of his alcohol and drug binge, footy star Karmichael Hunt would party for days on end without sleeping, hide cocaine in his golf bag, turn up to official team functions high, and even meet his “dealer” outside a pizza shop to score more for himself and his club mates.

The Sunday Telegraph has obtained information Hunt provided to Queensland law enforcement officers about his drug use, which includes explosive allegations against some of the biggest names in the two codes just days before he appeared in court.

The information was provided in return for Hunt getting a lighter sentence on four cocaine possession charges, which in turn saved his new $2 million contract with the Queensland Reds from being torn up.

Hunt would hide cocaine in his golf bag and, despite his famous sporting profile, he once met a drug dealer outside a Domino’s pizza restaurant on the Gold Coast to buy cocaine.

Hunt revealed details of player drug binges

Hunt revealed details of player drug binges Source: Supplied

Hunt returned to Reds training after the cocaine drama.

Hunt returned to Reds training after the cocaine drama. Source: News Corp Australia

And in a claim that will rock NRL administrators, Hunt identifies a previously unnamed NRL star as the person who gave him the phone number for a Gold Coast drug dealer.

The Sunday Telegraph has withheld the name of the Kangaroos and Origin player for legal reasons. He is not one of the Gold Coast Titans players who have been previously charged in relation to the scandal.

“I believe that I would have got (the dealer’s) number from (the player),” Hunt told the officers.

“While I have never partied with (the player) or seen him using drugs, I was aware that he partied every so often and dabbled with cocaine.

“It would have been for this reason that I contacted (the player) for a phone number to source cocaine for myself.”

Over a two-month drug and alcohol binge, Hunt bought a total of 12.5g of cocaine from a Gold Coast cartel.

He blames the stress of switching clubs and football codes for going off the rails.

“My memory from around this time was very hazy because of the amount I was drinking during the end-of-season weeks and I was using fair bit of cocaine around that time as well.”

ROLLING OVER

After he was charged, it is understood Hunt gave two statements to police in the knowledge it would lead to a lesser sentence, having pleaded guilty to the possession charges.

On March 4 in Southport Court, Hunt pleaded guilty to possessing cocaine.

He was fined $2500 and had no conviction recorded.

The four more serious charges of supplying cocaine were dropped.

Hunt playing golf and two of the places he revealed in his explosive statement.

Hunt playing golf and two of the places he revealed in his explosive statement. Source: Supplied

THE CONFESSION

The 28-year-old star, who now plays rugby for the Queensland Reds, admits he started using recreational drugs about six years ago.

In that time he managed to escape the drug testers in rugby league and AFL, who supposedly check players several times a year for recreational substances.

“When I was 22 or 23 I started experimenting using ecstasy when I was partying and drinking,” Hunt says.

“This would occur when I had extended time off, bye weeks or end of season.

“My use of ecstasy was pretty rare and I only used it about two or three times a year.

“This would always coincide with drinking alcohol. A few years later I experimented with cocaine, again when I was out drinking at bye weeks, end of season or other extended time-off periods.

“I remember nights when I was drinking very heavily and I would wake up remembering that I had snorted some cocaine.

“Initially I would only be using it when other guys had got some and gave it to me but there were occasions a few years after that where I would buy some for myself.”

THE BINGES

“My use of cocaine in the off-season was never as heavy as it was at the end of last season. There were a number of stresses during late-2014, including changing clubs and football codes, and I accept that my cocaine use during this time was the worst that it had ever been by far and I regret it.”

He says he did not delete the phone number of the alleged drug dealer from his mobile phone until he moved from the Gold Coast to Brisbane last December to begin training with the Queensland Reds.

“My memory from around this time was very hazy because of the amount I was drinking during the end-of-season weeks and I was using a fair bit of cocaine during that time as well,” he says.

END-OF-SEASON PARTY

Before their last game of the season against the West Coast Eagles, Hunt reveals a unit was booked in Burleigh for the Gold Coast Suns AFL players to party for a few days.

In the week leading up to the party, Hunt says he gave another former NRL player “a couple of grand” for him to purchase “two eight-balls of cocaine”.

Another Suns player paid half the money. Again for legal reasons, The Sunday Telegraph is withholding his name.

“I kept the cocaine at home in a golf bag and then at a later date at the Burleigh apartment,” Hunt said.

“The cocaine was purchased for our personal use during the end-of-season celebrations.

“There was no financial gain for me at all.”

 

THE MAD MONDAY

Celebrations were held at Swell Apartments in Burleigh, about 100m from the beach on the famous party strip.

Hunt said he and another player checked into the apartment on Sunday night, August 31.

The players then attended a club dinner and party before returning to the apartment at midnight. He names five other players who were with them. Their names cannot be published either.

“I was very drunk by the time we got back to the apartment,” Hunt said.

“I had used a little bit of cocaine at the party and I was affected by both alcohol and cocaine.

“I put the cocaine I bought on the dining room table.

“I was vaguely aware that most people there were using the cocaine during the night. I noticed the next morning all the cocaine had gone.”

At 7.26am Hunt made a call to the dealer to get more.

The Hinterlands where Hunt admitted to using cocaine in the toilets.

The Hinterlands where Hunt admitted to using cocaine in the toilets. Source: Supplied

THE HINTERLANDS

The next morning club members travelled on a bus to the Hinterlands for a lunch at the Bearded Dragon.

Most of them hadn’t slept from the party.

Because it was a public place, Hunt says he used cocaine that day in the toilet.

“I had not slept all night and looking back I remember feeling delusional on the day,” he said.

THE GOLF TRIP

A week after the Mad Monday celebration, a group of Suns players went on an end-of-­season golfing holiday to the Sunshine Coast.

The players took 30 cases of beer and some premixed UDL cans of Vodka.

Hunt said he took cocaine during a golf trip.

Hunt said he took cocaine during a golf trip. Source: News Limited

And of course Hunt took some cocaine.

According to Hunt, all but two players used the cocaine. It was before this getaway that Hunt met the (drug dealer) for the one and only time.

“I met with (the dealer) at Domino’s Pizza on the Gold Coast Highway at the end of Miami, start of Broadbeach,” he said.

“I was with (a player) and we chipped in about half the money each as the cocaine was for both of us.

“I was pretty drunk for the first three days and I was using cocaine.

“We would play golf and drink throughout the day. At night we would drink alcohol and use cocaine.

“I was vaguely aware that most people there were using the cocaine at nights.

“I don’t recall who did and didn’t use it as I was drunk and affected by the cocaine.

“However I definitely know that (a player) and (a player) didn’t use any cocaine on that trip as they are both very anti-drugs and that has always been the case since I have known them.

“My memory from around this time was very hazy because of the amount I was drinking during the end-of-season weeks and I was using fair bit of cocaine around that time as well.”

Aussie Peter Scully to face Philippines court on ‘depraved’ paedophilia charges; videos allegedly featured rape, torture

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By North Asia correspondent Matthew Carney

An Australian man will face a Philippines court tomorrow to enter a plea on paedophilia charges described by authorities there as “depraved”.

Peter Scully allegedly ran an international paedophile ring from Mindanao in the Southern Philippines that raped, tortured and murdered children.

One victim was only 18 months old.

WARNING: This story contains graphic details which may be disturbing for some readers.

Scully first moved to Cagayan de Oro on the island of Mindanao in 2011.

Exploiting the poverty and desperation right on his doorstep, Scully approached Arlene Loyola and offered to give her eight-year-old daughter education and food.

Ms Loyola accepted the offer, but after two weeks she began to worry.

“I prayed and God told me to get her away from Scully and I did,” Ms Loyola told 7.30.

When Ms Loyola got her daughter back she had been bashed and badly bruised. Scully had repeatedly drugged and raped the girl.

Ms Loyola blames herself.

“I feel so ashamed and asked forgiveness from my child because she suffered so much,” she said, sobbing.

“She just wanted to go to school.

“I can’t sleep; I just can’t stop thinking about what happened to her.”

Customers paid $10,000 to view torture videos

But this was just the tip of the iceberg of Scully’s depravity.

Officers of the Philippines Bureau of Investigation showed 7.30 a dark old house with high walls in another part of Cagayan de Oro.

It was here Scully made the videos called The Destruction of Daisy.

He was selling the videos to online customers around the world for up to $10,000 a view.

We are pretty much sure that we have a very solid case and that he will be away for good.

Prosecutor Eric Nuqui

The full details of what happened at this house are too shocking to reveal.

But Angelito Magno, one of the lead investigators, gave 7.30 an insight.

“In one of these videos was an 18-month-old baby girl who was hanged upside down,” he said.

“She was crying all the time she was being tortured.”

Demand was so great for these sickening videos that six other foreigners, mainly from Europe, started to fund Scully.

But one made-to-order video proved to be Scully’s undoing.

In it, two girls, one 12 years old and the other 13, were forced to dig their own graves while being raped.

Mr Magno said the girls eventually led them to Scully.

“The two girls were able to escape and seek police assistance while they were still wearing chains, chains to their necks,” he said.

Mr Magno was part of the international team that arrested 51-year-old Scully in February, charging him on multiple counts of sexual abuse, cyber sex, torture, rape, human trafficking and murder.

In Manila, an investigation team is gathering all the evidence before the trial formally starts later this year.

They now have seven victims under witness protection who will testify against Scully in court.

Prosecutors confident Scully will go ‘away for good’

Eric Nuqui works at the Philippines Investigation Bureau and will be one of the lawyers who will be leading the trial against Scully.

“With the overwhelming evidence we have and with the prosecutors handling the case, we are pretty much sure that we have a very solid case and that he will be away for good,” he told 7.30.

The team in Manila and the Australian Federal Police are now working to identify and prosecute Scully’s customers around the world.

They have evidence that an Australian man offered Scully about $2,500 to rape a 13-year-old girl.

While the capture of Scully has been a success for the Philippines Bureau of Investigation, the reality is, with limited manpower and resources, they are struggling to cope with the flood of paedophiles entering the Philippines.

The Australian Federal Police say 250 Australians convicted of child sex offences have travelled to the Philippines in the last four years.

But Philippines authorities say they know of only 10.

Mr Nuqui said there was a problem in coordination in the Philippines.

“As far as I’m concerned, I’m yet to receive information,” he said.

“Maybe they’re providing information to other (Philippines) agencies and we are not able to access it.”


Philippines police arrest, prepare to deport Australian fugitive accused of child molestation

Posted 27 Mar 2015, 11:24am

An Australian fugitive wanted for molesting a young girl in Australia has been arrested in Manila and will be deported from the Philippines.

Philippines immigration officials stopped 39-year-old Roy Woodward upon his arrival in an airport in Manila from Sydney.

An alert posted by Australian Interpol said Mr Woodward had been accused of sexually abusing a 12-year-old girl and was set for sentencing by a local Australian court.

Following the arrest, an immigration intelligence official said Manila should keep a closer watch out for paedophiles and fugitives.

Another Australian, Peter Gerard Scully, is facing charges for the murder of a 12-year-old girl and sexual abuse of 11 children in the southern Philippines.

The Melbourne man is the key suspect in one of the most horrifying paedophile rings uncovered by police in the Philippines.

Mr Scully allegedly spent years sexually abusing and torturing young children and streaming his alleged crimes online.

If he is found guilty he will face life in prison.

The National Bureau of Investigation has launched a manhunt for four foreigners believed to have been working with Mr Scully since 2011.

The Philippines is a major hub of the billion-dollar global child cybersex industry due to its widespread poverty and legal loopholes.

The Philippines Justice Department secretary Leila de Lima last year said online child abuse was the leading cyber-related crime in the Philippines and made up 46 per cent of more than 200 cases.


Australian Federal Police says 250 Australians with child sex convictions travelled to Philippines in last four years

Updated 13 Apr 2015, 5:02pm

About 250 Australians with child sex convictions have travelled to the Philippines in the last four years, the Australian Federal Police (AFP) has revealed.

Filipino police are currently pursuing a case against Australian man Peter Gerard Scully for what they allege are some of the worst child sex offences in the nation’s history.

The AFP was involved in the investigation and arrest and says 250 known Australian child sex offenders travelled to the Philippines in the past four years.

A spokesman has told the ABC that Australia alerts Filipino authorities when a sex offender boards a flight, but it is up to them whether to refuse entry.

Scully, 51, who has no previous convictions for child sex abuse, was arrested and charged with sexually abusing 11 children aged between 18 months and 13 years.

He allegedly spent years sexually abusing and torturing young children and streaming his crimes online, where the AFP says he charged between $US100 and $US10,000 for the videos he filmed.

The Melbourne man has also been charged with the murder of one of his alleged victims, a 12-year-old girl, along with rape, torture, human trafficking and violating cyber laws.

On Saturday, authorities in the Philippines said Scully was working with foreign accomplices in his child pornography operation and launched a manhunt for four foreigners believed to be involved.

The Australian embassy held an emergency meeting late last week in relation to the case.

Editor’s note 13/4/2015: An earlier version of this story said 250 Australian sex offenders had travelled to the Philippines in the last year.

Nomads Motorcycle Club raids sparked by threats of blackmail and payback against two SA men


Standover 101, Give me 30 grand (happens to be the price for a nice harley) Give me your bike, and give me your car….fill in the rest.

Great to see the cops scooping these steroid pumped bludgers off the streets one by one. If we allow them to just come and standover folks demanding cash and to take  possessions we will never ever win the war against them.

The Nomads Hardcore tactics

Chief Court Reporter Sean Fewster
The Advertiser
June 01, 2015 5:19PM

THE two-state raids that smashed the powerful Nomads Motorcycle Club were sparked by threats of blackmail, payback and retribution against two SA men, a court has heard.

Prosecutors today asked the Adelaide Magistrates Court to remand two of the men in custody, despite their being granted bail when arrested in NSW last week.

Sandi McDonald, SC, prosecuting, said the allegations against the duo and their 10 co-accused were some of the most serious examples of bikie-related crime.

“In November, these men flew in from NSW, met up with the complainant, took him to the Adelaide High School oval and demanded $30,000, his car and his motorbike,” she said.

“He was taken to a motel where he was threatened, assaulted and told he was going to die.

Police arrest man during a bikie gang crackdown
http://www.adelaidenow.com.au/video/id-BjOHRjdTqruBV11eXa-n7ClDythZuhfj/Police-arrest-man-during-a-bikie-gang-crackdown/

“This defendant, a high-ranking member of the gang, threatened to slit his throat (and) cut his eyes out … he held the complainant’s head down and aimed a firearm at him.”

The man, whose identity is suppressed, is one of eight Nomads to face court today in the wake of last week’s raids by SA and NSW police.

Four members faced court last week, and one was supported by the gang’s national president, Sleiman “Simon” Tajjour.

Six more were extradited from Sydney on Friday — they did not apply for bail today and were remanded in custody until August.

One of the Nomads who faced court in Adelaide today, with a supporter.

One of the Nomads who faced court in Adelaide today, with a supporter.

The remaining two men travelled to Adelaide today under bail agreements imposed by the Paramatta Magistrates Court following the raids.

Each has yet to plead to a raft of blackmail, assault and threaten harm charges taking place at locations across Adelaide between November 2014 and March this year.

A final co-accused remains at large and is the subject of an arrest warrant.

The identities of the victims, and any information which would tend to identify them, are suppressed by order of the court.

One of the Nomads who faced court in Adelaide today.

One of the Nomads who faced court in Adelaide today.

Under SA law, a person charged with bikie-related offending is automatically banned from receiving bail unless they can show there are special circumstances warranting their release.

Today Michael Dadds, for the first of the two bailed men, said his client’s liberty should continue so he could return to Sydney, continue working and continue caring for his two children.

He said his client had severed his ties with the Nomads.

“He had been attempting, for some time, to disassociate himself from the club and, in January, he successfully did that … it was a delicate process,” he said.

A member of the Nomads Motorcycle Club being extradited from NSW.

A member of the Nomads Motorcycle Club being extradited from NSW.

“His lawyer in Sydney subsequently made inquiries with NSW police with a view to establishing how best to go about, in a formal way, ensuring that disassociation was noted.”

Mr Dadds said his client had attended a police station and signed a statutory declaration about his disassociation — “one of, if not the first” NSW bikie to do so.

He said the court should not place great weight on the allegations made by the complainant.

“The allegations are denied and there is a real question, in this case, about the reliability of the complainant,” he said.

A member of the Nomads Motorcycle Club being extradited from NSW.

A member of the Nomads Motorcycle Club being extradited from NSW.

“His allegations are uncorroborated … these allegations of blackmail and intimidation all rely on someone who is unreliable.”

Ms McDonald said that was not the case, as police had sourced CCTV footage from Adelaide Airport, the high school and the motel that matched the complainant’s account.

She said the court should not place great weight on the man’s claims of having disassociated from the Nomads.

“What I have been advised, through police in NSW, is that this defendant was charged with consorting offences and, during his police interview, claimed he had disassociated,” she said.

A member of the Nomads Motorcycle Club being extradited from NSW.

A member of the Nomads Motorcycle Club being extradited from NSW.

“Police asked him to fill in one of these forms, which were being piloted at that stage, and he did so.

“So it occurred in very contrived circumstances where this defendant had very vested interests … he did what he was told, when it suited him, when it was in his best interests.”

Magistrate Jayne Basheer refused the man bail and remanded him in custody until August.

Paul Mazurkiewicz, for the second man, said his client be allowed to remain at liberty because, on the police version of events, he “played a lesser role” in the alleged offending.

He said his client was barely mentioned in the complainant’s statements to police and, when he was, it was him leaving a room or standing nearby while others uttered threats.

“All these allegations of gouging out eyeballs, firearms, being held down on beds, threats, demands for money, they don’t involve my client,” he said.

Mr Mazurkiewicz said the man who faced court on Friday was the “mover and shaker” in the incident, as described by the complainant’s witness statement.

“The complainant says he saw my client leave the room before (the man who appeared on Friday) demanded he continue to tell the Nomads he was not able to come up with the $30,000, but he still had to pay (that man) the $30,000,” he said.

“(That man) also told the complainant if he ever told anyone about it, he would kill him.

“It would appear (that man) was on a frolic of his own and recruited other people to help him.”

He said his client had left the gang and now “faced consequences” as a result of that decision.

Ms McDonald said the man should be remanded in custody, saying he played far more than a “peripheral” role in the incident.

She said he had menaced the complainant physically, by standing close to him and raising his fists, and verbally by agreeing with and supporting threats made by others.

“It was not a stroll in the park — it was heated and animated,” she said.

Ms McDonald said the man was part of a 13-strong group that flew to Adelaide, threatened the complainant “as the first thing they did” and then “flew out the next day”.

“These people put themselves in the one per cent of the population that holds itself above the law and this is what they do — retribution and intimidation,” she said.

She said that, when the man was arrested, he was found to be in possession of a sawn-off .22 calibre rifle and a loaded magazine for an SKS assault rifle.

Magistrate Basheer remanded the man in custody overnight and will hand down her ruling on bail tomorrow.


12 Nomad outlaw bikie gang members arrested in SA and NSW

Twelve Nomad bikie gang members have been arrested and charged with a range of offences,

Twelve Nomad bikie gang members have been arrested and charged with a range of offences, including solicit to murder.

FOR nine months, police have tracked the Adelaide chapter of the Nomad outlaw bikie gang amid allegations of extortion within its own ranks.

Today, the gang is in shreds after being smashed by a two-state police operation, and eight South Australian Nomads, including two of the gang’s highest-ranking patched members, are in jail. A ninth is on the run.

Charges against a total of 12 people include soliciting to murder, kidnapping, blackmail and assault, and police say they have dealt the gang a “significant blow”.

The group only has 10 or 12 patched members in Adelaide and The Advertiser understands it has been established in SA for about a year.

Assistant Commissioner Paul Dickson said the SA president and sergeant-at-arms, as well as the NSW-based national vice president, were arrested as part of the operation. He said the victims were other members or associates of the gang.

“All of these offences were committed as a result of the victims not undertaking the required acts set out by the Nomads,” he said.

Mr Dickson said the allegations showed what outlaw bikies were capable of, especially as the offences were allegedly committed against their own.

“They are quite happy to harm the community and they are quite happy to harm their own members if it suits them,” he said.

He said there were 10 outlaw bikie gangs operating in SA, with about 300 members.

“About 25 per cent of OMGC members are in police custody or under some sort of condition, like parole,” he said.

High-ranking outlaw bikies arrested

Director of Litigation Research Unit at the University of Adelaide David Caruso said arrests of this scale send a clear message to the club.

“The police are obviously confident they have built a significant case to say that there are at least this number of people involved in a criminal enterprise,” he said.

“With the Nomads in South Australia, where the number is not many more than the group arrested, it at least sends a message from the police – which needs to be tested in court – that says they are operating in South Australia for criminal purposes.”

As part of the operation, more than 170 officers from SA and NSW conducted raids across the two states, with 18 Adelaide properties searched.

Police will allege the offences happened in SA between November 2014 and March 2015, and the 12 arrested people were either full members, nominees, prospects or associates of the Nomads.

“These are well-organised criminal gangs driven by a culture of self-interest and violence internally and within the community,” Mr Dickson said.

“This offending also demonstrates again the cost and risks linked with being a member of, or associated with, an OMCG.”

Five South Australians, aged between 24 and 50, were arrested in NSW and have appeared in court for extradition back to their home state. Another three South Australians – from Andrews Farm, Parafield Gardens and Pennington – were arrested in Adelaide and were in court on Wednesday.

Of the four NSW residents arrested, three will face extradition to Adelaide.

Those arrested are:

■ A Clearview man, 24, will appear in the Goulburn Magistrates Court today for an extradition hearing.

He will be charged in SA with solicit to murder, two counts of aggravated blackmail, participating in criminal organisation, aggravated assault causing serious harm with intent and aggravated kidnapping.

■ An Elizabeth North man, 26, will appear in the Goulburn Magistrates Court today for an extradition hearing.

Supplied Editorial

An alleged Nomad bikie gang member is arrested in NSW. Picture: NSW Police

He will be charged with aggravated assault causing serious harm with intent, false imprisonment, participating in criminal organisation and aggravated kidnapping.

■ An Andrew Farms man, 26, was charged with aggravated assault causing serious harm with intent. He appeared in the Adelaide Magistrates Court yesterday and was remanded in custody until August 4.

■ A Paralowie man, 50, will appear in the Goulburn Magistrates Court today for an extradition hearing.

He will be charged with aggravated assault causing serious harm with intent.

■ A Campbelltown man, 31, will appear in the Goulburn Magistrates Court today for an extradition hearing.

He will be charged with participating in a criminal organisation.

■ A Para Vista man, 40, will appear in the Goulburn Magistrates Court today for an extradition hearing.

Police-supplied images of the Nomad bikie arrests - this arrest takes place at Clearview.

Police-supplied images of the Nomad bikie arrests – this arrest takes place at Clearview.

Images of the arrest at Clearview.

Images of the arrest at Clearview.

He will be charged with aggravated assault causing serious harm with intent, false imprisonment and participating in a criminal organisation

■ A Parafield Gardens man, 37, was charged with aggravated assault causing serious harm with intent, false imprisonment, participating in a criminal organisation and aggravated kidnapping.

He appeared in the Adelaide Magistrates Court yesterday and was remanded in custody until August 4.

■ A Pennington man, 35, was charged with aggravated assault causing serious harm with intent, false imprisonment, participating in a criminal organisation and aggravated kidnapping.

He appeared in the Adelaide Magistrates Court yesterday and was remanded in custody until August 4.

■ A Sydney man, 30, has been arrested and following a court appearance will be extradited to SA to face two counts of aggravated blackmail, making aggravated threats to kill and cause harm, aggravated assault causing harm, blackmail and participating in a criminal organisation.

■ A 37-year-old man, from Kenthurst in NSW, was arrested and charged with making aggravated threats to kill and cause harm, aggravated assault causing harm and aggravated blackmail.

He has been bailed to appear in the Adelaide Magistrates Court on June 1.

■ A 30-year-old man, from Fletcher in NSW, was charged with making aggravated threats to kill and cause harm and aggravated assault causing harm.

He is expected to appear at an extradition hearing in NSW today.

■ A 26-year-old man, from Merrylands West in NSW, was charged with aggravated blackmail. He is expected to appear at an extradition hearing in NSW tomorrow.

Police have also issued a warrant for the arrest of a Paralowie man, 41, who is wanted in connection with this investigation.


ONE of Australia’s most senior outlaw bikies has attended an Adelaide court to support an arrested colleague following raids that have left their gang in shreds.

Nomads national president Sleiman “Simon” Tajjour sat in the public gallery of the Adelaide Magistrates Court today, while one of his crew sat in the dock in custody.

The Advertiser understands that man, 31, whose identity has been suppressed, is a senior national office-bearer for the club.

Mr Tajjour outside the Adelaide Magistrates Court, where he was supporting a colleague.

Mr Tajjour outside the Adelaide Magistrates Court, where he was supporting a colleague.

Nomads national president Sleiman “Simon” Tajjour flashes a smile for waiting media.

Nomads national president Sleiman “Simon” Tajjour flashes a smile for waiting media.

He has yet to plead to two counts of aggravated blackmail, making threats to kill and cause harm and aggravated assault causing harm.

The man is further charged with blackmail and participating in a criminal organisation.

He was one of 12 gang members arrested yesterday in a two-state operation that involved more than 170 officers from SA and NSW.

Mr Tajjour, who has not been charged with any offence, listened from the public gallery as prosecutor Sandi McDonald, SC, asked the charged man’s case be adjourned.

A member of the Nomads gang being escorted out of the City watch house.

A member of the Nomads gang being escorted out of the City watch house.

“This is his first appearance, and this matter will eventually join up with the 12 other accused on a date that has been set in August,” she said.

Ms McDonald said three of those accused had already faced court, while the others would be flown into Adelaide this afternoon to face court on Monday.

She asked the man’s name and image be suppressed until police completed identification procedures.

One of the Nomad gang members being escorted out of Adelaide Airport.

One of the Nomad gang members being escorted out of Adelaide Airport.

Ms McDonald also asked the court suppress the names, images and anything that would tend to identify the two alleged victims in the matter.

“By the next court date we will have received statements from the two alleged victims, which I understand are quite voluminous,” she said.

“We will also be making an application to have this defendant declared a serious organised crime offender.”

Another member of the Nomad gang members being escorted out of Adelaide Airport.

Another member of the Nomad gang members being escorted out of Adelaide Airport.

A third extradited Nomad gang member being escorted out of Adelaide Airport.

A third extradited Nomad gang member being escorted out of Adelaide Airport.

The man’s Sydney-based lawyer, Omar Juweinat, said his client would be seeking release on bail and asked a hearing date be set.

“The officer in charge (of the operation) is most likely going to be required for a short cross-examination during that hearing,” he said.

Magistrate Jayne Basheer remanded the man in custody for a bail hearing next month, and to join up with his co-accused’s cases in August.

Mr Tajjour declined to comment outside court, telling reporters to “ask my lawyer”.

Mr Huweinat also declined to comment.


Gerard Baden-Clay Appeal 7th August 2015


Mountains of stuff on here about the tragic death of Allison by her husband Gerard Baden Clay. To catch up here is a link to posts tagged with Allison below

http://aussiecriminals.com.au/?s=alison+baden+clay&submit=Search

ALSO feel free to use the menu up to to get the full picture.

Reserved for appeal hearing and discussion

Flowers for Allison, may justice has been served

Flowers for Allison, may justice has been served

Appeal date set August 7 2015 for Gerard Baden-Clay over murder of wife Allison


Many hundred pages and thousands of comments have been made about GBC on this site. Use the Menu up top follow the history folks or start here…

http://aussiecriminals.com.au/category/gerard-baden-clay/

May 19, 2015

Gerard Baden-Clay will appeal his conviction over his wife Allison’s murder in August.

The Queensland Court of Appeal has confirmed the year’s most hotly anticipated hearing will take place on August 7.

A jury convicted the former prestige real estate agent of his wife’s murder following a high profile trial last year.

Police photograph of Gerard Baden-Clay.Police photograph of Gerard Baden-Clay. Photo: Supplied

He was sentenced to life in prison with a non-parole period of 15 years.

Mrs Baden-Clay’s body was found under the Kholo Creek Bridge 11 days after her husband reported her missing on April 19, 2012.

Gerard Baden-Clay has always maintained he is innocent of his wife’s murder.

Following a 21 day trial in the Supreme Court of Queensland last year, Baden-Clay was found guilty of killing his wife at their home in the leafy western Brisbane suburb of Brookfield.

Her body was dumped about 14 kilometres away, on the banks of Kholo Creek at Anstead.

Baden-Clay’s trial heard he was embroiled in an affair with his long-time mistress Toni McHugh and was under significant financial pressure, owing hundreds of thousands of dollars to friends, family and ex-business partners at the time of his wife’s disappearance.

His murder conviction marked a dramatic fall from grace for the former real estate agent, who prided himself on his lineage as the great-grandson of famed Scouts movement founder Lord Robert Baden-Powell.

His lawyers lodged an appeal two days after the guilty verdict was returned.

Baden-Clay claimed he was the victim of a “miscarriage of justice”, in the appeal papers lodged by his solicitor Peter Shields.

He has appealed his conviction on four grounds, including that the verdict of murder was “unreasonable”, because the jury was incorrectly directed about evidence relating to blood found in the boot of Mrs Baden-Clay’s four-wheel-drive.

“A miscarriage of justice occurred because the jury should have been, but was not, directed that the presence of the deceased’s blood in a motor vehicle was only relevant if the jury was satisfied beyond reasonable doubt that the presence of the blood was attributable to an injury sustained to the deceased’s body on the evening of 19 April 2012, or the morning of 20 April 2012,” the application reads.

Baden-Clay has also claimed that presiding judge Justice John Byrne misdirected the jury about the injuries which appeared on his face on the morning he reported his wife missing, as well as evidence relating to the discovery of Mrs Baden-Clay’s body on the banks of Kholo Creek at Anstead.

“The trial judge erred in law in not directing the jury that they needed to be satisfied beyond reasonable doubt that the appellant placed the body of the deceased at Kholo Creek in order to use such a finding as post-offence conduct going to guilt,” the application says.

“The trial judge erred in leaving to the jury that the appellant attempted to disguise marks on his face by marking razor cuts.”

The prosecution alleged Baden-Clay cut his right cheek with a razor in a failed attempt to disguise the scratch marks his wife had left on his face while fighting for her life.

Baden-Clay has maintained the injuries on his face were shaving cuts, but four forensic experts told his trial the abrasions were more consistent with fingernail scratches.

Baden-Clay’s trial, and his eventual conviction, was one of the biggest news events of 2014.

The father-of-three wept and shook violently after the seven men and five women of the jury delivered their guilty verdict.

His three young daughters with Allison, who are now being cared for by her parents, were not in court to hear the jury foreman declare their father guilty of their mother’s murder.

In February, it emerged the three girls remain unable to access their mother’s dual life insurance policies, collectively valued at nearly $800,000, until their father exhausts his legal avenues to have his conviction overturned.

 

Vile paedophile Gerald Ridsdale gives evidence at Royal Commission today

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IN his own words, Gerald Francis Ridsdale was “out of control”, and spoke of his desire to be removed from situations where he had evil urges to molest small children.

Ridsdale — Australia’s worst paedophile priest — told church investigators after his first conviction in 1994 that he “went haywire” in the Victorian town of Mortlake where he’s believed to have abused every boy in school.

Asked by a Catholic Church representative what happened he said: “I got out of control again. I went haywire there. Altar boys mainly.

“It was no secret around Mortlake eventually about me and my behaviour; there was talk all around the place among the children and one lot of parents came to me.”

Ridsdale has been convicted for abusing more than 50 children over 30 years, but the real figure may be in the hundreds.

He is giving evidence before the child sex abuse royal commission’s Ballarat inquiry on from his jail cell.

In admissions being streamed live over the internet, Ridsdale has told the hearing he couldn’t control his sexual urges and was hoping to get “sexual instructions ” on how to relate to people from the church.

He said he’d always felt the need for intimacy and closeness. But the only intimacy he ever had with an adult came while he was in prison.

“I think I’ve always felt the need for closeness.”

He realised he was attracted to young boys not women while he was at Werribee seminary. Despite the realisation, he didn’t want to lose the “status” of being a priest.

Also while he was at the seminary he had a problem with masturbation and was told he needed to stop it “or leave” — but he says he couldn’t stop.

Gerald Ridsdale gives evidence by video link.

Gerald Ridsdale gives evidence by video link. Source: Supplied

Ridsdale said he never told anyone about his sexual abuse of boys, even during confession, because the “overriding fear would have been losing the priesthood”.

Asked what he specifically didn’t confess he said: “The sexual offending against children.”

The 81-year-old was aware what he was doing was a crime.

Speaking matter of factly, Ridsdale couldn’t remember the names of his earliest victims but is relying on court documents.

Asked whether he selected his victims by deliberately targeting “poor families”, Ridsdale agreed.

“It’s obvious to me now that there was a pattern of seeing victims as being vulnerable … but not always vulnerable,” he said.

He also agreed his usual method was to involve himself with multiple families with no father present and then use opportunities such as church camps and outings to abuse the children of those families.

He has told of “fondling and touching” young boys and once a complaint was made he was threatened to be shipped to the “missions”.

In another major development today, Cardinal George Pell has said he is prepared to give evidence at the Royal Commission in person if he has asked to, but so far he hasn’t been asked Sky News reported.

What the church knew about the abuse — and how it treated the news — has formed a major part of what the commission is investigating.

A series of letters and documents published on the sex abuse royal commission’s website reveal details of Ridsdale’s abuse and the response from the Catholic Church, including Ballarat bishop Ronald Mulkearns.

‘I went haywire with altar boys’

Gerald Ridsdale (left) arriving to court with George Pell Source: Supplied

Ridsdale has been convicted for abusing more than 50 children over three decades, dating back to his ordination in 1961.

After parents complained to then Ballarat Bishop James O’Collins about Ridsdale in 1961, O’Collins told him: “If this thing happens again then you’re off to the Missions” and sent him to Mildura. The royal commission was also told Bishop Mulkearns knew in 1975 that Ridsdale had abused boys — but did not act until 1988.

Among the other documents are a letter from Ridsdale to Bishop Mulkearns about stepping down from parish work in Horsham, 11 April, 1988: “I confirm my request to step down from parish work in this diocese so that I may be removed from the kind of work that has proved to be a temptation and a difficulty for me.”

In a letter to a victim in 1979, Ridsdale wrote as if they were lovers and told him some good would come from his abuse, the Herald Sun reported.

“I don’t know how much you know about me or how much you’ve guessed, but you’re the first person I’ve ever wanted to open up to. You’re the first kid I have been honest with and warned off (a bit late unfortunately, but I suppose all experiences bring some good out in us),” he wrote.

Bishop Mulkearns wrote to Ridsdale in November, 1988, after Ridsdale had faced a suspension from some duties for a year. Mulkearns noted Ridsdale had been doing some work helping isolated families but said it was not a good idea for him to celebrate reconciliation or baptism.

Australia’s worst paedophile priest Gerald Ridsdale.

Australia’s worst paedophile priest Gerald Ridsdale. Source: Supplied

“With regard to the problems which have arisen, it could possibly be asked at a later date whether you continued to administer sacraments and it would be to be able to state that you had not been involved at this level with people.

“I hope I don’t sound too harsh in the above, but I feel that it is most important that we honour the undertakings which have been given and that we do nothing at this time which might rebound on us later.

“I have every hope that nothing more will eventuate, but we have to do our part to ensure that it does not.”

Ridsdale will not be asked about his offending, after being convicted in four separate court cases of abusing more than 50 children. But the royal commission and victims want to know who was responsible for moving Ridsdale from parish to parish, allowing him to continue to offend.

A victim, who was abused by other clergy in the Ballarat diocese, said victims wanted the truth made public about who essentially facilitated the abusers.

“We’d love to know how high it went up the tree as well and if those people are still in power now,” the victim told AAP.


Child sexual abuse inquiry: Notorious paedophile Gerald Ridsdale feared confession would cost him priesthood, royal commission hears

Updated about an hour ago

One of Australia’s most notorious paedophiles, Gerald Ridsdale, never revealed the extent of his offending to avoid being stripped of his priesthood, the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Abuse in Ballarat has heard.

The elderly Ridsdale is giving evidence to the inquiry via video link from Ararat prison, where he is serving an eight-year sentence for the rape and abuse of children, some of them as young as four.

He told the royal commission he could not remember committing some of the offences and had forgotten the names of some of his earliest victims.

Ridsdale revealed he “didn’t confess the sexual offending against children” because he had a great fear of losing his priesthood.

“I was a very proud person … it just would’ve been devastating,” he told the commission.

He also told senior counsel assisting the commission, Gail Furness SC, he could no longer recall being abused himself as a child, despite making statements to that effect in the 1990s.

Ridsdale said statements he made in 1994, about being abused by members of the clergy, including a Christian Brother when he was 11 or 12 years old, would have been correct at the time.

The inquiry is examining what the Catholic Church knew about the extent of Ridsdale’s offending as he was moved from town to town.

He was quizzed at length about whether or not people were warned about his offending tendencies as he was moved from between schools around western Victoria, in the 1960s and 70s.

When asked by Ms Furness if anyone was notified at Mildura, when he was relocated there from Ballarat, he answered “I don’t know”.

Ridsdale did say he was warned by clergy in Ballarat before being moved to Mildura, “if this happens again you’ll be off to the missions”.

Ridsdale recalled abusing choir boys in Mildura, and later at Swan Hill, when he was again moved on.

“Yes … there would probably be another couple [of victims] there,” he told Ms Furness.

But Ridsdale said as far as he knew, no-one in Swan Hill was aware of his offending, and he would not know if anyone at his next location, Warrnambool had been warned.

He said he was told “in the usual manner” that he would be relocated and that there was “no consultation”.

Ridsdale unable to control his sexual urges

Ms Furness also asked Ridsdale about his sexual urges.

He told the commission he felt bound to become a priest because of family expectations, but had problems controlling his sexual urges from the beginning.

Ridsdale said he would make confessions that he had masturbated, and was hoping to receive some “sexual instructions” from the church about what was appropriate during his training as a priest.

“Did you ever feel the need for intimacy, hugging and closeness?” asked Ms Furness of Ridsdale’s time at the Werribee seminary, where he started out.

“I think I’ve always felt the need for closeness,” Ridsdale responded.

He said he had had one adult relationship for three years, with a fellow prisoner.

Ridsdale said he was aware his offending against children was a crime.

“Did it occur to you at the time that you were hurting the children?” commission chairman Justice Peter McClellan asked Ridsdale.

“Your Honour, I just don’t know … I don’t know what I was thinking,” Ridsdale said.

Ridsdale told the inquiry the church should report crimes to the police.

He was asked if the church should have notified authorities of his own offending over the years.

He replied: “What I’ve done and the damage that I’ve done … I’d say, definitely yes”.

Ridsdale said while he had come to the view now that crimes should be disclosed, when he was a priest, “everything told in confession was to be kept secret”.

Inquiry probes Ridsdale’s relationship with Cardinal George Pell

Ridsdale told the royal commission the fact Cardinal George Pell accompanied him to court on child sex abuse charges in the 1990s was insignificant.

He said he could not recall much about his relationship with the then Father Pell in Ballarat in the 1970s, except he “would’ve met him, because he was Ballarat born-and-bred”.

“I can’t remember him being there … I can’t remember him … I never had much to do with him,” Ridsdale said of Cardinal Pell.

“We needed some people to come along [to court] for support … I don’t see it as having a very big significance.”

Ridsdale said his barrister asked Cardinal Pell to go to court, and he did not ask him himself.

He said, at the time, he did not know if Cardinal Pell knew about the nature of his charges, and he did not know, what Cardinal Pell planned to say.

He said his legal team was “clutching at straws.”

The hearing continues.

Robert Emmett, judges’ son, likely to avoid jail after conviction for child abuse material

Featured


Oh how sweet it is to have family like this sick bastard has. The black sheep from one of Australia’s most distinguished families of judges is likely to avoid jail, despite being convicted of possessing child abuse material. Possession of 10,000 sickening images as well as sneaking around trying to up-skirt while “He tied his shoelaces” Friggin pathetic, as if his family ties have not been laid bare in this case.

Updated 56 minutes ago

Robert Emmett was arrested for possessing more than 10,000 child abuse images.

Robert Emmett was arrested for possessing more than 10,000 child abuse images

A former teacher from one of Australia’s most distinguished families of judges is likely to avoid jail, despite being convicted of possessing child abuse material.

Robert Emmett, son of NSW Court of Appeal judge Arthur Emmett and Federal Circuit Court judge Sylvia Emmett, was arrested in 2013 for possessing more than 10,000 child abuse images, some involving bestiality, pain and humiliation.

Emmett’s grandfather is Sir Laurence Street, former Chief Justice of the NSW Supreme Court, a position also held by his father Sir Kenneth Street and his father Sir Philip Street.

Robert Emmett, a former maths teacher at St Andrew’s Cathedral School, today pleaded guilty to charges that included filming the private parts of children and possessing child abuse material.

In the NSW District Court, a sentencing judge said Emmett was remorseful and had no prior convictions.

The court heard Emmett walked around St Andrew’s filming some students on his camera phone and, on one occasion, pretended to tie his shoelace while crouching down to film up a girl’s dress at Town Hall Station in the CBD.

Some images in the ‘worst category of abuse’

District Court judge Ian McClintock said some of the images found in Emmett’s possession were in the “worst category of abuse”, involving pain, bestiality and humiliation and that some involved children as young as four.

The court heard the images were photos and videos, but it was not clear how he acquired all of them.

“There is no evidence the child abuse material was for anything but personal use,” the judge said, adding that some of the images were disturbing.

He said Emmett secretly videoed three schoolgirls aged 14.

“In my view it is a significant aggravating feature that the offender was a school teacher,” the judge said, noting that Emmett abused his position of trust.

He referred to the “significant violation” of the students’ rights.

Judge McClintock said Emmett’s family was not aware of his activities and that the 38-year-old had a good support network to help with his rehabilitation.

The court heard Emmett was remorseful, timid and shy and would need to be in a high level of protective custody in jail.

It heard the publicity surrounding the case had been humiliating for the offender and his family.

“He’s lost his career,” the judge said.

“Nothing other than a sentence of imprisonment is warranted.”

But Judge McClintock emphasised a sentence of less than two years was appropriate and therefore the offender is suitable to be assessed for an Intensive Correction Order — meaning he may be able to serve his sentence in the community.

Emmett remained on bail and will return to court in July.

He faced a maximum sentence of 10 years for possessing child abuse material and a maximum of five for filming a person’s private parts.

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