Who wants to be a unpaid crime blog reporter/contributer?


Not real journo’s who still have a job, maybe cadets (but not good for resume…mmm)

Maybe old school scribes who wish they could stay in the game!

How about folks like me with no relevant qualifications but gives a toss about the crimes in their communities?

The pay-off is a verdict like today GBC cowardly wife killer.

People like me? You relate to how I write?

Hey cant spell well, 2 finger typer…So am I YES…Our stuff gets checked before we post.

Sounds like you?

GOOD keep reading

This site has had massive coverage lately (I cover non famous crimes too)

I’m thinking along the lines of a Co-ordinator in each state

That co-ordinator runs that states crimes and has authors who get the stories up.

What do you think?

Sound good, bad, troublesome, confusing?

All I want is to give the best coverage of what is going on in our communities.

The community expectations has/have?  outgrown my skills honestly…

Each state, minimum deserves better coverage. The good people email me why haven’t you covered this rape, or that kidnapping, or the death of a cousin in my indigenous community.

You could help us!

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GBC Trial Day 19.5 (the weekend)

Featured


Something to get the chat going for the weekend

Baden-Clay murder trial: Large crowds in court evidence of a healthy legal system, top barrister says

11/07/14

Gerard Baden-Clay

The murder trial of Gerard Baden-Clay has seen a ticketing system introduced to prevent overcrowding

The high level of public interest in the Gerard Baden-Clay trial is nothing out of the ordinary, and in fact makes for a healthy legal system, a top barrister says.

The former real estate agent’s murder trial attracted crowds to the Brisbane Supreme Court, with extra courtrooms opened for people who queued day after day to gain entry, and a ticketing system introduced to prevent overcrowding.

The Department of Justice and Attorney-General says these special arrangements for large-scale trials are made to ensure openness and transparency in the justice system.

This transparency is key to keeping Australia’s legal apparatus – everyone from police to barristers and judges – held to account, says Ken Fleming, QC.

Mr Fleming was the defence barrister for former Bundaberg surgeon Jayant Patel and has worked as a United Nations prosecutor on international war crimes trials.

“Everyone should be held accountable for what they’re doing, and the open scrutiny of it is a very important thing,” he said.

“You just can’t have things going on behind closed doors, because that engenders fear of the unknown.”

Mr Fleming says the “whole delivery of justice” depends on high levels of public interest, because people can see and understand the process.

Seeing mystery unravel part of appeal, barrister says

The courts are not, however, in danger of turning into another form of entertainment – rather, they always have been.

“You only have to think about the French Revolution and the guillotining in the forecourt of the Notre Dame,” Mr Fleming said.

Although some people may attend just to see a mystery unravel, he believes many also have a genuine interest in watching the ins and outs of the legal process.

There might be some prurient interest as well, but I think that’s not the major reason people are there.

Ken Fleming, QC

“You only have to look at some of the British television programs to see how we love a good murder mystery,” he said.

“There might be some prurient interest as well, but I think that’s not the major reason people are there.

“They just have a genuine interest in what’s going on.”

Glen Cranny, a defence lawyer and partner at Gilshenan and Luton Lawyers, also believes a high level of public interest is healthy for the criminal justice system generally.

“People might come for any number of reasons, and some might come for mawkish reasons,” he said.

“Nevertheless, I think the benefits of having an open and transparent system … far outweigh any perverse interest some people may get out of such proceedings.”

Public pressure witnesses face may discourage some: lawyer

Publicity and public interest in a case can also encourage other complainants or witnesses to come forward and give evidence, where they may have otherwise been unaware or not confident enough.

Rolf Harris‘s case in England, for example, involved people who were coming forward as complainants once they, I think, had the courage that there were protections and systems in place for their story to be told,” Mr Cranny said.

But this benefit has a flip-side: that very publicity could make people apprehensive about revealing their story.

“I think there is a tipping point where some people might think they could do without their face or name being splashed on TV as a witness, or as a complainant,” Mr Cranny said.

“They would be happy to be involved in the process in a low-key way, but don’t want to be engaged … in anything that might in some way feel like a circus to them.”

Reputational issues should also be factored in, especially when a person’s conduct, while lawful, may not hold them in a good light.

“We’ve seen in a recent high-profile case … a lot of focus on extra-marital affairs and so on,” Mr Cranny said.

“There are people who are involved in those relationships, who haven’t broken the law, but have become very prominent just through their personal lives.”

Mr Fleming says that while public interest could make some people “a bit reluctant”, he had not seen any evidence of public attendance impacting on witnesses.

“It is on display and in a sense it’s theatre,” he said.

“But once people are resigned to the fact that they will be giving evidence, I don’t think too much stands in their way.”

Opening additional courtrooms and keeping the public away from “where the action is happening” also means witnesses are only faced with a very small and confined audience in the main court, Mr Fleming said.

All previous threads and history including trial can be found clicking on link below http://aussiecriminals.com.au/category/gerard-baden-clay/

List of Trial Witnesses as they appear here

ANY EVIDENCE LIKE PHOTOS, VIDEO OR DOCUMENTS THE COURT RELEASES TO THE PUBLIC WILL BE PUBLISHED in the GBC Documents Page

Brisbane Supreme Court Justice John Byrne has asked a jury to retire to consider a verdict in the trial of Gerard Baden-Clay.

Police raid Box Hill property and seize $15m worth of drugs


Detectives from the Drug Squad have seized more than $15 million worth of illicit drugs,

Detectives from the Drug Squad have seized more than $15 million worth of illicit drugs, arrested two men and shut down a large clandestine laboratory. Photo courtesy of NSW Police. Source: Supplied

More than $15 million worth of drugs, including 70,000 MDMA tablets, have been seized after police uncovered a clandestine lab in Sydney.

Detectives stopped a car on Wednesday in Box Hill, north west of Sydney, and arrested two men, a 35-year-old from Bondi and 24-year-old from Cranebrook.

Police raided a nearby property and allegedly uncovered a large scale drug lab and one kilogram of the drug ice.

Detectives from the Drug Squad have seized more than $15 million worth of illicit drugs,

Detectives from the Drug Squad have seized more than $15 million worth of illicit drugs, arrested two men and shut down a large clandestine laboratory following an operation in Sydney on Wednesday and Thursday (2 and 3 July 2014). Photo courtesy of NSW Police. Source: Supplied

Three litres of methylamphetamine oil and more then 200 items used to make ice and MDMA was also found.

Hours later another raid was carried out at a Bondi unit, where police allegedly found 70,000 tablets believed to be MDMA, weighing in at about 17 kilograms.

Officers also found 4kg of MDMA powder, more than 4kg of ice and a ballistics vest in the beachside suburb unit.

Drugs seized following a raid in Box Hill. Photo courtesy of NSW Police.

Drugs seized following a raid in Box Hill. Photo courtesy of NSW Police

Police believe the total potential street value of the drugs is about $15 million.

Both men have been charged with a drug manufacturing, and the Bondi man is also facing drug supply offences.

This year alone NSW police have shut down 44 drug labs.

Detective Superintendent Tony Cooke said officers involved in the major drug haul had been working around the clock.

“That hard work has now been rewarded with a significant quantity of drugs not making it to the street,” the drug squad commander said.

“We will continue to do everything we can to stop illicit drug syndicates profiting at the community’s loss but members of the public need to continue playing their part too.” Both men were refused bail in Parramatta Local Court on Thursday, and will appear in Central Local Court on August 28.

Police uncovered a clandestine drug lab in Box Hill. Photo courtesy of NSW Police.

Police uncovered a clandestine drug lab in Box Hill. Photo courtesy of NSW Police.

President of the WA Islamic Council, Dr.Rateb Jneid on firearms charge, Jneid brothers on serious drugs charges


Press Release

Press Release

Dr.Rateb Jneid is the president of the WA Islamic Council.

Dr.Rateb Jneid is the president of the WA Islamic Council.

The president of the WA Islamic Council has been charged as part of an organised crime investigation in which police seized 4kg of methylamphetamine, weapons and more than $250,000 cash.

Dr Rateb Jneid, who is also the chairman of the Langford Islamic College, will face a firearms charge after raids by 70 police officers at properties in Kewdale, Bibra Lake and Munster.

 

Two of his brothers, Ziad and Rabih, have pleaded not guilty to drugs charges and have accused police of setting their family up.

Property developer Ziad Jneid

Property developer Ziad Jneid

Ziad, 38, has repeatedly denied any role in a Lebanese crime gang operating in Perth called the Sword Boys and told _The West Australian _yesterday he was the target of corrupt police.

“They hate us so much,” he said. “They’ve offered money to people to set us up. They’ve charged us with drugs charges, which are all lies and I’ll prove it in court.”

Dr Jneid, 43, said he was unaware of the charge by summons of failing to store a firearm securely.

Gang Crime Squad officers have charged four people over raids which netted multiple guns, ammunition, drugs and $380,000 in cash

Gang Crime Squad officers have charged four people over raids which netted multiple guns, ammunition, drugs and $380,000 in cash

In January, officers from the regional operations group seized 2kg of methylamphetamine after searching a car they stopped in Kewdale.

Several weeks later, another 2kg of the drug was uncovered as part of the investigation and six men have been charged.

“It will be alleged the drugs were from the same syndicate,” a police statement said.

The Jneid brothers have extensive business interests, including construction and property development, and two years ago Ziad Jneid successfully challenged a $27 million bill from the Australian Taxation Office.

He has previously lodged complaints with the Corruption and Crime Commission against WA detectives.

“This is all police fabrication and they are trying everything to frame us,” Ziad Jneid said.

On April 25, police from the gang crime, organised crime and proceeds of crime squads stormed four houses where members of the Jneid family live in Acton Avenue, Kewdale.

“They cut the power off to the houses where my brother and my mother live and came through every window where there were children,” Ziad Jneid said.

“My nephews and nieces were shaking. My kids have been sleeping in my wife’s bed for the last three weeks because they are still in fear of the raid and the way they did it.”

A prominent member of the Islamic community, Dr Jneid liaises with politicians, police and other community leaders and last year he unsuccessfully ran for the City of Belmont.

“As a husband and father of three, I am aware of the need to make our city an enriching and safe place for young people,” Dr Jneid wrote in his candidate profile.

His lawyer Shash Nigam said it was disappointing that Dr Jneid learnt of the firearms charge through the media.

“He and his brothers will be vigorously defending these charges,” Mr Nigam said.

Dr Jneid is due to appear in the Perth Magistrate’s Court on June 6. Ziad and Rabih are due to appear in the Perth Magistrate’s Court on July 24.

WA Islamic Council president Rateb Jneid among those charged over drugs, guns seizure

The president of the West Australian Islamic Council is among six people charged over the seizure of four kilograms of methylamphetamine, firearms and $380,000 in cash.

Police from the Organised Crime Squad in Perth have charged Rateb Jneid, two of his brothers and three others over the haul.

It is understood Jneid is one of two people charged with firearms and weapons offences, while his brothers have been charged with drug offences.

Police media’s Sam Dinnison said some drugs were initially found when police stopped a car in January.

“Officers located and seized approximately two kilograms of methylamphetamine after searching a vehicle they had stopped in Kewdale,” he said.

“The driver initially failed to stop and attempted to evade them.”

Mr Dinnison said in the following weeks, a further two kilograms were seized by Organised Crime Squad detectives.

Photo: Drugs and firearms seized from a car and in raids in Perth.

“It will be alleged the drugs were from the same drug syndicate,” he said.

Police said the street value of the drugs seized was $8 million.

In April, 70 police raided six properties in Kewdale and Bibra Lake.

“It will be alleged a search of those properties resulted in the seizure of over $380,000 cash, two firearms, ammunition, steroids and pepper spray canisters,” Mr Dinnison said.

Two men from Kewdale, a 38-year-old and a 40-year-old, have been charged with a number of drug offences, including the conspiracy to sell or supply a prohibited drug.

A 40-year-old man from Bibra Lake has also been charged with the same offences.

A 33-year-old man from Munster has been charged with supplying a prohibited drug and possessing a firearm without a licence.

The five men and a woman charged in connection to the raids are due to appear in court in July and August.

The ABC has been unsuccessful in its attempts to contact Jneid.

Police reject brothers’ set-up claim

Police reject brothers set-up claim

Police have rejected accusations they have “set up” two brothers they claim are masterminds in an alleged drug syndicate caught importing methylamphetamines valued at $8 million.

Ziad and Rabih Jneid say they will fight serious drugs charges, including conspiracy to sell or supply a prohibited drug and supplying a prohibited drug, laid after a police operation that netted 4kg of crystal methylamphetamine, steroids, weapons and more than $380,000 cash.

Their brother – WA Islamic Council president Rateb Jneid – has been charged with failing to store a firearm securely after police allegedly found a gun that was licensed but easily accessible and not properly locked away when they raided the family’s Kewdale properties.

Two other men have been charged with serious drug offences over their alleged involvement in the importation and distribution of the drugs and a woman has been charged by summons with weapons offences. The charges stem from an organised crime squad operation launched in January after officers from the regional operations group found 2kg of methylamphetamine in a car in Kewdale.

Several weeks later, police found another 2kg of the drugs and claim they were from the same long- running criminal network.

Ziad Jneid has claimed the police allegations against his family are fabricated and police are “trying everything to frame” them.

Acting Det-Supt Chris Adams yesterday rejected those claims, saying police were “very comfortable” with the decisions they had made and would do what they could to stop drug distribution in WA.

“We’re confident we have a solid brief . . . through the judicial process the evidence will come out as to what we have and what led to these charges,” he said.

Police would allege the men charged with drug offences were “the masterminds of co-ordinating the importation and distribution of these drugs across Perth”.

Acting Det-Supt Adams said police were still unravelling the alleged drug network’s “sophisticated and complex” operations to determine where the drugs came from and how they were smuggled into the State.

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Roger Rogerson and Glen McNamara charged with murder of Jamie Gao


more details released 28/05/14

IT was in unit 803, a bare brick rented storage room, where Jamie Gao was shot twice in the chest by two former detectives, police will allege.

CCTV footage allegedly shows the ex-cops Roger Rogerson and Glen McNamara walking out of the unit alone just 10 minutes after arriving with Mr Gao last Tuesday.

Roger Rogerson inside a police wagon being taken to Bankstown Court / Picture: Craig Gree

Roger Rogerson inside a police wagon being taken to Bankstown Court

The Self Storage units IN Padstow where its believed Jamie GAO was killed / Picture: John

The Self Storage units IN Padstow where its believed Jamie GAO was killed

They then backed their own station wagons up to the unit’s roller door, where they allegedly carried out Mr Gao’s body wrapped in a surfboard cover and a blue tarpaulin.

Officers later seized a surfboard from McNamara’s Cronulla home. They also found items of clothing which he had allegedly been seen wearing on the CCTV footage.

The next day, May 21, it is alleged the two men returned and spent 40 minutes cleaning the inside of the Rent-A-Space unit after dumping Mr Gao’s body at sea using McNamara’s 4.5m Quintrex fishing boat.

Video of disgraced ex detective and accused murderer and drug dealer “Roger the Dodger Rogerson” being loaded up for trip to jail late this afternoon.

4.25pm 27/05/14 DISGRACED Sydney detective Roger Rogerson has been charged with murder and the body found floating off Cronulla yesterday has been identified as missing Hurstville man, Jamie Gao.

Rogerson has also been charged with large commercial drug supply and refused bail and will appear in Bankstown Local Court later today.

quick update 27/05/14 Rogerson hand cuffed and arrested a minute ago at his Padstow Heights home. His lawyer furious,caught his client off guard, obviously NSW cops reneged on deal to have him presented at Sydney Police Centre  at midday. Cops raided his house just after 11am.

 Two old crooked coppers heads have popped up again.This time drugs deals and murder have turned up the heat on the two disgraced cops. Kings Cross Detective Glen McNamara has been refused bail, and Roger Rogerson is apparently up in Queensland. Silly young kid probably had no idea who he was dealing with.

Don’t do drug deals with crooked coppers/drug dealers or you allegedly end up like this kid with your Big drug deal of 3kg of meth stolen, murdered and tossed into the sea off Cronulla

My page on the disgraced former detective Roger Rogerson is here http://aussiecriminals.com.au/high-profile-criminals/roger-rogerson/

Jamie Gao murder : The surprising discovery that stunned the cops

Tragic end: Friends of Gao walked into Kogarah police station saying they held grave fear

Tragic end: Friends of Gao walked into Kogarah police station saying they held grave fears for the missing university student three days before his body’s discovery. 

IT was probably the most extraordinary moment in the painstaking investigation into the murder of student Jamie Gao. There, in a bag hidden under the driver’s seat of a white station wagon in which Gao was allegedly last seen alive, was 3kg of the drug ice.

Even more astoundingly, police will claim, the vehicle was parked in the underground carpark at the Cronulla unit complex where their chief suspect, former police officer Glen McNamara, lived.

Officers from Strike Force Album could hardly believe what they were seeing. They rang headquarters and said: “Boss, you’re not going to believe it — we’ve found the drugs.”

They had swooped about 4am on Saturday last week while McNamara was asleep, secretly removing the car — along with the drugs.

Shocking: The body found floating near Shelly Beach

Shocking: The body found floating near Shelly Beach 

But it wasn’t until Sunday morning that McNamara discovered the car was gone, triggering a flurry of panicked calls to his alleged accomplice, disgraced former police detective Roger Rogerson. A short time later, McNamara drove to Cooma prison, in southern NSW, to visit an inmate.

The events were just another astounding development in a case that had already been full of surprises.

Three days earlier, friends of Gao walked into Kogarah police station saying they held grave fears for the missing university student.

They had become worried after being tipped off by two men, Hong Kong nationals, who had driven Gao to the alleged drug deal during which he was killed.

The men had seen the ­20-year-old get into a white station wagon in Arab Rd, Padstow, in Sydney’s southwest. The car drove 600m, turning into the Rent A Space storage facility, slowly followed by a silver Ford Falcon. Gao was carrying a bag with 3kg of methamphetamine — worth $3 million if sold on the street as the drug ice — for what was meant to be a quick exchange for hundreds of thousands of dollars.

 Timeline:

Weeks leading up to Tuesday, May 20

Jamie Gao boasts about drug deal with man named Glen.

Tuesday May 20

11.37am: Police allege Glen McNamara calls Gao from a Cronulla phone booth to confirm the deal is on.

1.35pm: Two men from Hong Kong drive Gao to Padstow. He gets into station wagon with 3kg of ice.

1.45pm: Car is driven 600m to a storage unit, followed by a Ford Falcon. Gao and McNamara enter Unit 803, Rogerson follows.

1.47pm: Gao is allegedly shot twice in the chest.

1.55pm: Rogerson and McNamara walk in and out of the unit a number of times. There is no sign of Gao. Soon afterwards Rogerson and McNamara are seen dragging a surfboard cover with something heavy inside from the unit.

2.35pm: Friends receive call from the Hong Kong nationals to help them search for Gao.

Wednesday, May 21

12.30pm: McNamara and Rogerson return to Unit 803, allegedly cleaning up.

7pm: Gao’s friends finally report him missing.

Thursday, May 22

Police view CCTV footage from storage facility and allegedly identify McNamara and Rogerson.

Saturday, May 24

4am: Station wagon recovered by police with 3kg of ice allegedly inside it.

Sunday, May 25

Detectives execute search warrants at Rogerson and McNamara’s homes, seizing several cars and other evidence.

6.20pm: McNamara is pulled over and charged with murder and drug supply.

Rogerson’s home in Padstow Heights is searched and a silver Ford Falcon is seized.

The storage unit in Caringbah is searched and a boat and surfboard with no cover are seized.

Monday, May 26

7.30am: Fishermen off Cronulla find Gao’s body wrapped in tarpaulin.

Detectives fly to Brisbane to search for Rogerson.

McNamara appears in custody in Kogarah Local Court.

Tuesday, May 27

6am: Rogerson arrives at his Padstow home to see his wife after driving from Brisbane.

11am: More than a dozen police officers storm Rogerson’s Churchill Rd home to arrest him.

3.15pm: Rogerson is charged with Jamie Gao’s murder.

4.10pm: McNamara appears in court and doesn’t apply for bail. Both he and Rogerson are held in protective custody in Silverwater Jail.

But Gao vanished and, after an hour’s anxious wait, the Hong Kong nationals phoned Gao’s friends, who arrived to help search for him. Over the next few hours they took Gao’s car and drove around searching the streets of Padstow. They finally abandoned the vehicle in a nearby street and left the area, waiting almost 30 hours before going to police.

The friends told officers that Gao had been boasting for weeks about a meeting with a man named Glen, at 1.35pm on Tuesday, May 20, for a drug deal.

It appeared at the time the UTS student had been kidnapped and the Serious Robbery and Crime Squad were called in. Meanwhile, the Hong Kong nationals fled the country.

A senior detective said: “The clock was ticking because we thought we had this kid tied up somewhere and we had to find him.”

Led by the highly respected veteran Detective Inspector Russell Oxford, the entire resources of the squad were rallied. More than 50 detectives began the task of tracking Gao’s last movements, starting with an examination of all the CCTV vision retrieved from storage units in Padstow. As the hours ticked into Thursday, officers came to the CCTV footage taken from the Rent A Space storage facility on Davies Rd.

“We couldn’t believe our eyes,” said one senior detective. As they tracked back to the previous Tuesday, the CCTV showed two men getting out of a white station wagon, and one ushering the other into unit 803. Police claim the first man was later identified as Glen McNamara. The second was Gao.

A few minutes later a third man, whom police claim was Rogerson, entered the unit and pulled down the roller door. At 1.55pm the door opened again — but only Rogerson and McNamara came out. In that 10-minute window, police will allege Gao was shot dead with two bullets from a small calibre weapon fired into his chest.

Rogerson and McNamara are then allegedly seen backing their cars up to the unit’s entrance. From the back of a white station wagon, McNamara pulls a surfboard cover while from his silver Ford Falcon Rogerson takes what looks like a blanket, and they re-enter the unit. A short time later McNamara, 55, and Rogerson, 73, are seen dragging the surfboard cover with something heavy inside it from the unit and loading it into the back of the station wagon. Office chairs from inside the unit were placed on top.

Fast-forwarding through the CCTV footage, Rogerson and McNamara are allegedly seen returning to unit 803 the next day to clean it, spending 40 minutes inside before returning the office chairs they had removed the day before.

Starting with the video evidence, detectives worked backwards as the focus of the investigation switched from a possible kidnapping to a suspected murder.

Like a twisted version of Hansel and Gretel, McNamara and Rogerson, two experienced criminal investigators, scattered a trail of electronic and forensic evidence in their wake. The alleged drug deal and execution took place in the middle of the day and was captured by a multitude of cameras — most of which are clearly visible if you happen to glance up.

“The stars of Amateur Hour,” more than one detective said in disgust.

“It’s too bizarre, the story doesn’t make sense,” another officer said.

For the next five days detectives worked around the clock, gathering an abundance of evidence from CCTV, forensics, phone-tracking data and intercepted phone calls.

On the Friday night police issued a press release calling for help in locating Gao without revealing they were gathering evidence against their two prime suspects.

It was on the next day police discovered the white station wagon, and by now investigators were finalising plans to make arrests.

Police had eye on victim for years

DESPITE his image as a straight-A student, murder victim Jamie Gao had been in the sights of federal police as a suspected drug importer for years, it can be revealed.

The clean-cut 20-year-old UTS business student had been a ‘person of interest’ since 2011. Federal officers had even provided a 20-page document to NSW authorities detailing his activities.

That Gao was able to obtrain 3kg of ice signals he was a highly ranked and trusted member of the drug syndicate, believed to be a Hong Kong-based Asian organised crime group.

“He was not some lowly delivery boy,” said one senior detective. “No syndicate is going to trust some underling with 3kg of gear and you don’t get trusted with that much for your first deal.”

But police say that, inexplicably, Gao broke the underworld’s universal rule of drug-dealing: The drugs never go to the money.

“The money always comes to the drugs,” an experienced detective said. “The one with the drugs has the power; you would want to see the money before you show the gear — then you do the deal. But you never let the drugs out of your sight.”

It is clear Gao trusted who he was dealing with.

 

Last Sunday, Commander of the Robbery and Serious Crime Squad Detective Superintendent Luke Moore called a press conference to reveal details of Gao’s last known movements.

Meanwhile, Rogerson had flown to Brisbane for a speaking engagement and, with McNamara in the state’s south, detectives executed a number of search warrants at their homes, seizing several cars and crucial evidence. Also seized was McNamara’s Quintrex boat from his Caringbah storage unit, which police allege was used to dump Gao’s body.

At 6.30pm that day, McNamara was arrested during a car stop at Kyeemagh and charged with murder and supplying a commercial quantity of drugs. Then, in yet one more incredible twist, the next day as the morning news bulletins were reporting McNamara’s arrest and expected appearance at Kogarah Court, a blue tarp was spotted floating off Shelly Beach at Cronulla.

Inside was the body of Jamie Goa — the frayed rope around his feet had broken free of the weight that was supposed to sink him to the bottom of the ocean.

Both Rogerson and McNamara, who appeared briefly in court last week, did not apply for bail and have been remanded in custody until their next court date on July 22.

Detectives will now focus their attention on vital missing pieces of the puzzle, including the whereabouts of the Hong Kong nationals and who is behind the Hong Kong syndicate that supplied the drugs.

But for now, the once-formidable and feared Rogerson — now a frail 73-year-old — remains behind bars.

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IS THIS SCENE OF GAO’S MURDER?

The The self storage units where Jamie Gao is believed to have been killed

The self storage units where Jamie Gao is believed to have been killed

STAFF at the Padstow storage facility where Jamie Gao is believed to have been murdered say there was nothing unusual on the afternoon he was killed.

Detectives contacted the storage business, just 600 metres from where Gao went missing at 1.40pm on Tuesday, May 20, early Thursday morning.

They met with staff at 2.30am and walked around the 510 unit business for 30 minutes before requesting the CCTV hard drive.

Detectives returned later that morning and seized the footage for the previous two weeks.

The business said it had not been contacted since.

A senior manager said he was unaware of forensic officers establishing a crime scene in a unit since Thursday.

He said police had not told them Gao was murdered on their site and detectives were “vague” when they visited the site.

Police said following Glen McNamara’s arrest on Sunday Gao was allegedly killed in a storage unit close to where he was last seen.

The site has more than 30 cameras and between 15 to 50 customers visit it each day.

“They said they were looking into a missing person possibly being held for ransom. We provided the CCTV to police,” the manager said.

“If it (a murder) was done it was without us knowing. There was nothing out of the blue that caught our attention.”

People who rent storage units need to provide government issued photo identification or can rent a unit through a business.

The manager said the sound-proofing of the units was equivalent to a garage.

“If someone was screaming you’d only hear it if you were walking past,” he said.

Investigators also visited a Bansktown storage facility, 2kms north of where Gao was last seen at McDonald’s, on Friday.

“They said they were checking storage facilities and were looking for a body,” a staff member said.

A third storage facility in Revesby refused to say if police had visited them over the last week.

On Monday detectives spent more than an hour inside Mick Meat’s on Arab Rd, where Gao was last seen getting out of his car, talking to staff.

Gao’s car was found by police around the corner on Stuart St after two Asian men who arrived with Gao returned hours after he went missing and moved it.

May 26, 2014

Sydney university student Jamie Gao

Sydney university student Jamie Gao 

update 11.30am 26/05/14

A body believed to be that of Jamie Gao found off the Sydney coast near Cronulla

A body believed to be that of Jamie Gao found off the Sydney coast near Cronulla

Police investigating the suspected murder of Sydney university student Jamie Gao are on their way to the discovery of a body off the coast of Cronulla.

A former NSW detective has been charged with Mr Gao’s murder, and officers attached to the Robbery and Serious Crime Squad are waiting to speak to disgraced former detective Roger Rogerson over the disappearance.

Police arrested Glen McNamara in the Sydney suburb of Kyeemagh last night

Police arrested Glen McNamara in the Sydney suburb of Kyeemagh last night

Sources close to the investigation have told Fairfax Media the discovery of the body “fits” with the events they allege happened around the time of the Mr Gao’s disappearance.

A police boat locates a body found off the coast of Sydney.A police boat locates a body found off the coast of Sydney.

NSW detectives are flying to Queensland on Monday to talk to Mr Rogerson.

Sydney Water Police officers scooped the body, which was wrapped in a blue tarpaulin, from the sea off Cronulla just before 9am on Monday.

The body was floating about 2.5 kilometres off Shelly Beach, said Lachlan Steven, who spotted it at 7.30am while travelling with a friend from Sydney Harbour to Cronulla in a boat.

2014-05-26_11-45-01

He said the body was wrapped in a bright blue-coloured tarpaulin held together by white rope. He saw two feet with “white leather runners” on.

Mr Steven, 24, who works in construction, described the body as small, about 150 centimetres in length. “[The body] was pretty short… a very small body,” he said.

He came within two metres of the body.

“It’s pretty sunny out here, and there’s no wind,” he said.

Sydney Water Police officers in San Souci confirmed they sent a boat and recovered the body.

“Police responded to reports of a body in the water off Shelly Beach at Cronulla. A post-mortem will determine the cause of death. The deceased has not been identified,” a police spokesman said.

FORMER Kings Cross detective Glen McNamara has been charged with the murder of missing student Jamie Gao.

Police believe Mr Gao, 20, was kidnapped and allegedly murdered after attending a mystery meeting on Arab Rd, Padstow last Tuesday.

The Sydney University student was last seen getting into a white car after talking to two men.

Disgraced former detective Roger Rogerson is also being sought for questioning over the disappearance of Mr Gao.

Another former detective and a known associate of Rogerson, Glen McNamara, was arrested at 6.30pm last night after a car stop in Kyeemagh.

The 55-year-old Cronulla man was charged at St George Police Station by the Robbery and Serious Crime Squad with murder and large commercial drug supply.

He was refused police bail to appear at Kogarah Local Court today.

Update 7.05pm 26/05/14

Jamie Gao was killed during drug deal with Glen McNamara and Roger Rogerson within an hour of getting in their car.They stole his drugs and McNamara killed him. His body wrapped in a tarp and dumped in the water off Cronulla Beach. Detectives have flown to QLD to get Rogerson. SCUMBAGS all 3, the drug dealer and these 2 ex coppers.

Investigators suspect Mr Rogerson was the second person sitting in a car when Mr Gao, 20, got inside, carrying what they say was $3 million worth of ice.

A security camera in Padstow caught some of the last movements of Mr Gao, showing him walking from his sports car on Arab Street with a bag tightly held in his right hand.

Within an hour police allege he would be killed for the bag’s contents – by  former Kings Cross detective Glen McNamara.

The 20-year-old is seen walking away from his white Nissan Silvia at 1.30pm, where he meets up with two other men.

He gets in their car and is driven to a storage unit nearby, where police allege he was murdered before 2.30pm.

Police claim the two men in the car were Mr Rogerson, a disgraced former detective, and Mr McNamara.

Glen McNamara is a former police officer who wrote a book about police corruption in King

Glen McNamara is a former police officer who wrote a book about police corruption in Kings Cross. 

Police executed a search warrant at McNamara’s residence in Cronulla, seizing a blue Ford Falcon XR6 and a number of other items of interest to investigators.

Officers also executed search warrants at Rogerson’s Padstow Heights home, seizing a silver Ford Falcon motor vehicle, and a storage unit in Caringbah, where they seized a boat.

A third car, a white Ford Falcon, has also been seized from a location in Cronulla.

Detectives believe this is the vehicle Mr Gao got into on Arab Rd last Tuesday.

Police are still trying to locate 73-year-old Rogerson, who is believed to be in Queensland.

Rogerson was not answering telephone calls last night.

2UE reported its news team had spoken to Rogerson’s wife Anne. She said Rogerson spoke to police about 8pm last night and denied any involvement in Mr Gao’s disappearance.

Robbery and Serious Crime Squad commander Det-Supt Luke Moore said the investigation by Strike Force Album would continue.

“Our inquiries to date have led us to conclude that Mr Gao has been murdered,” Det-Supt Moore said.

“While we have charged a man with murder, this investigation will continue and we may make further arrests.

“We still don’t know where Mr Gao’s body is and are strongly encouraging anyone who can help us locate his remains to contact police.”

McNamara’s lawyer Charles Moschoudis said last night he was unable to comment on the matter.

“I would like to help but I really can’t,’’ he said.

“It might be better if you speak to the police.’’

Former police detective Roger Rogerson.

Former police detective Roger Rogerson. 

University student Jamie Gao had been talking excitedly for days about the mystery meeting, which police now believe led to his kidnapping and murder.

Family and friends said the 20-year-old was vague about what the meeting was about except that it was of great significance­ to him. “Jamie told friends the meeting was really important, was excited about it but wouldn’t say much else,’’ Robbery­ and Serious Crime Squad head Detective Superintendent Luke Moore said yesterday. “And when he talked to friends he indicated he would be seeing them later in the day.’’

The Hurstville resident was last seen getting into a white car on Arab Rd, Padstow, near a McDonald’s about 1.40pm last Tuesday after chatting to two men.

“What that meeting was about, we don’t know,’’ Supt Moore said.

He has not been heard from since and his phone, keys and wallet were found near his white Nissan Silvia sedan, which was abandoned in Stuart­ St, Padstow, on the afternoon of that mysterious meeting.

There was nothing in Mr Gao’s background to suggest he was involved in drugs or any other criminal activity.

“But that is not to say he may not have gotten involved in something way above his head,’’ Supt Moore said.

At first police treated Mr Gao’s disappearance as a possible kidnapping for ransom but released details after the investigation led them to believe the motive was related to something else.

Jamie Gao’s motor vehicle, a Nissan Sylvia, was found abandoned in Stuart St, Padstow / P

Jamie Gao’s motor vehicle, a Nissan Sylvia, was found abandoned in Stuart St, Padstow

Police established there had not been any contact with family members and that Mr Gao’s family did not seem to have the sort of money normally­ associated with ransoms.

His mother, a Hurstville business owner who was on an overseas holidays at the time, has flown back from Hong Kong to Sydney. “Jamie is an only child and his mother is extremely distraught.”

Mr Gao was born in Sydney and was completing a business degree at the University of Technology, where he was a capable and good student.

Police investigations of friends, family and associates paint a picture of a fairly normal young man who didn’t have lots of money or a lavish lifestyle.

Friend Jessica Yun said on social media: “He hasn’t contacted us or anything, me and my friends are worried sick.”

Robbery and Serious Crime Squad commander Det-Supt Luke Moore addresses the media regardi

Robbery and Serious Crime Squad commander Det-Supt Luke Moore addresses the media regarding Jamie Gao’s disappearance. 

At the same time the then cop Roger Rogerson was putting criminals behind bars, he was a willing participant in many of the crimes.

After chalking up 13 bravery awards in the ’80s, his world quickly fell apart and he was jailed for a number of offences in the 1990s. In 2005 he and his wife were convicted of lying in 2005 to the Police Integrity Commission in 1999. He served another year in jail.

THE RISE AND FALL OF GLEN McNAMARA

Glen McNamara was a Kings Cross detective.

Glen McNamara was a Kings Cross detective. 

BY BEN McCLELLANGLEN McNamara was a police corruption informant and drug detective in Kings Cross.

He published two books, Dirty Work in 2010 and Savage Obsessions in 2012, about his career, including a plot to murder the corruption whistle blower which resulted in his wife miscarrying a child.

McNamara started his policing career at age 19 in the Kogarah and Cronulla areas in the 1980s before moving to the inner-city.

According to background information released about the author to promote Dirty Work McNamara was brought up in the southern suburbs of Sydney as a “real Aussie boy”.

“Free lunches, intimidation, the lack of arrests and criminal investigation rings at Darlinghurst and Kings Cross stations sounded warning bells in McNamara’s mind.”

He claimed to have uncovered a protection racket that involved notorious pedophiles Dolly Dunn and Colin Fisk who were alleged drug suppliers.

McNamara eventually fled to the US where he learnt of a murder plot against him before going to the Internal Police Security Unit.

He provided them with tapes and written evidence but claimed the unit betrayed him.

“Glen’s story is a tale of hard-hitting truth and guts, and the fight for justice by one lone policeman in a sea of corruption and money making,” the book’s press release claimed.

“Glen fails to give in, and clings to what’s right. In bravely sharing his story Glen takes a potential tragedy and turns it into an inspirational lesson of courage and strength.”

McNamara said in 2010, to promote Dirty Work, someone had to act.

“I was worried. Would I do all of the dirty work, like a broom cleaning up a floor, and in the end get locked up in the broom closest — dispensable?,” he said.

“All crime revolves around the financial powerhouse that is the drug trade. And drugs and pedophilia go together like a hand in a glove.”

Savage Obsessions claimed to be “true crime from the streets of Kings Cross”.

“From police violence, police informants and their murders, women who kill their mothers, pedophiles, gang rapists and suicides, this book is a true crime thriller.”

Roger Rogerson charged over Jamie Gao murder; Gao shot twice in the chest, police allege


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Disgraced former detective Roger Rogerson faces a media scrum as he is arrested at his Sydney home over the alleged murder of student Jamie Gao.

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Disgraced former police detective Roger Rogerson has been arrested at his Sydney home over the alleged murder of student Jamie Gao.

POLICE will allege that Jamie Gao was allegedly shot twice in the chest by two former detectives Roger Rogerson and Glen McNamara in a rented storage room.

Earlier today, the state’s most infamous former detective Rogerson limped into the dock at Bankstown Local Court charged with murdering student Gao.

A special late sitting was arranged to get Rogerson, 73, before a court after he was arrested earlier today.

His solicitor Paul Kenny said that he would be making a formal complaint about the “disgraceful” actions of police who turned up at Rogerson’s home this morning despite arrangements having been made with police for him to hand himself in at the Sydney Police Centre in Surry Hills.

He said Rogerson’s arrest was theatrical and staged for the media.

 

Under arrest...Detectives lead Roger Rogerson away for questioning. Picture: John Grainge

Under arrest … Detectives lead Roger Rogerson away for questioning.

‘Treated like a dog’.... Rogerson’s lawyer was furious at his treatment. Picture: John Gr

‘Treated like a dog’ … Rogerson’s lawyer was furious at his treatment.

Rogerson, 73, who recently had knee reconstruction surgery, was not required to say anything in court and he did not apply for bail.

Magistrate Elaine Truscott formally refused bail and remanded Rogerson in custody to appear at Central Local Court on July 22, the same day as his co-accused former Kings Cross detective Glen McNamara.

The body found floating off Cronulla yesterday was earlier identified as Gao, the missing Hurstville man.

It was spotted by fishermen early yesterday morning about 1.5km offshore. It was wrapped in a blue tarpaulin.

Detectives storm Rogerson’s property this morning.

Detectives storm Rogerson’s property this morning. 

And some use the front door.

And some use the front door. 

The 20-year-old University of Technology student had been missing since Wednesday.

An examination of the remains, for the purpose of identification, was conducted a short time ago. A post mortem examination, to determine the cause of Mr Gao’s death, has not yet been completed.

Detectives made the dramatic arrest just before 11am this morning, more than a dozen officers storming Rogerson’s Churchill Road address in Padstow.

Less than 10 minutes later brought out a frail looking Rogerson in handcuffs.

As he was escorted to a waiting police car Rogerson said: “We’re back to the Gestapo days now.

Taken away... Rogerson is driven from his home by detectives. Picture: John Grainger

Taken away … Rogerson is driven from his home by detectives.

“On the advice of my solicitor I am saying nothing”.

It is understood Rogerson was due to meet police at 12pm but officers did not wait with several banging on the front door asking his wife Anne to answer. Others raced around the back of the home.

Rogerson’s lawyer Paul Kenny said he was furious at the arrest. He said police treated Rogerson, 73, like an animal.

“He was treated like a dog,” Mr Kenny told reporters, adding he would complain to the police commissioner.

 He was treated like a dog. This is like something from a bad TV show 

“He’s very distressed. I’ve never seen conduct like this by NSW police. I’ve been in shoot outs. I’ve been bashed. I’ve had everything under the sun done to me.

“I’ve never seen conduct like it’s just occurred here ever.

“What occurred in there is not proper police practice, it’s an absolute disgrace”.

“This is like something from a TV show. But a bad TV show.”

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Police swarm Roger Rogerson’s Sydney home, arresting the disgraced former detective in relation to the alleged murder of student Jamie Gao.

Earlier Mr Kenny turned up at his client’s Padstow Heights home saying he did not want an “OJ Simpson situation”.

“We want things to move smoothly this morning. We don’t want any OJ Simpson situation,” he said, referring to the hysteria surrounding the pursuit and subsequent arrest of the famous sports and TV personality.

“We don’t want some type of American hysteria type situation. Things are totally out of control as it is.”

CONSUMMATE STORYTELLER: MANY ENJOYED A BEER WITH ROGERSON

Lawyer Paul Kenny at Rogerson’s home today

Lawyer Paul Kenny at Rogerson’s home today 

Rogerson pictured with Mark Dixon on Sunday.

Rogerson pictured with Mark Dixon on Sunday. 

Horror find ... Gao’s body floating in ocean

Horror find … Gao’s body floating in ocean 

Victim ... Jamie Gao

Victim … Jamie Gao 

Charged ... Former detective Glen McNamara yesterday. Picture Craig Greenhill

Charged … Former detective Glen McNamara yesterday.

Police recover Gao’s body wrapped in plastic and floating in water near Shelly Beach.

Police recover Gao’s body wrapped in plastic and floating in water near Shelly Beach. 

Rogerson was photographed with former Chopper Read bodyguard with boxer Mark “Hammer” Dixon on Sunday night. “He seemed on top of the world that day. He had a few beers, sold a few books. He didn’t have a worry in the world,” Mr Dixon said.

Yesterday, another former detective Glen McNamara was charged with Gao’s murder.

Damning CCTV footage allegedly captured the two former officers carrying between them what appears to be the body of Mr Gao.

Police will allege Mr Gao was killed in an alleged $3 million ice deal gone wrong.

The whole sequence of events from Mr Gao’s meeting about an hour earlier when he allegedly got into a car with the two men on a Padstow street was filmed on CCTV at various businesses in the south-western Sydney suburb.

The two experienced former police officers are alleged to have used their own cars. It is claimed that Mr Gao’s body was put in McNamara’s white station wagon, which was followed by Rogerson in his silver Ford Falcon.

Security vision showing a man, believed to be Jamie Gao, and two others getting out of a

Security vision showing a man, believed to be Jamie Gao, and two others getting out of a vehicle. 

Gao’s white Nissan Sylvia sedan was found abandoned in Stuart Street, Padstow

Gao’s white Nissan Sylvia sedan was found abandoned in Stuart Street, Padstow 

Almost at the same time as the arrest, fishermen found a body, believed to be that of Mr Gao, wrapped in a blue tarp with ropes and chains off Cronulla beach, the same suburb where McNamara lives with his wife and family.

As McNamara appeared in Kogarah Local Court charged with murder and supplying 3kg of methamphetamine and was refused bail, two detectives with the Serious Crime and Robbery Squad flew to Brisbane to find Rogerson, 73, and arrest him on the same drug and murder charges.

A post-mortem on Mr Gao, a young Sydney University of Technology student, is expected to be conducted today.

Detectives with the Serious Crime and Robbery Squad formed Strike Force Album and have been working around the clock since early Wednesday morning, following the report of Mr Gao’s disappearance on Tuesday afternoon.

Police will allege Mr Gao met with two young Asian men on Arab St, Padstow.

The two Asian men have not been identified.

Detective Superintendent Luke Moore said police believe Mr Gao was murdered near the Padstow meeting spot.

“The purpose of the meeting we now strongly believe, and we will be putting to the court, was for a drug transaction (for) a substantial quantity of prohibited drug,” he said.

Former detective Glen McNamara’s car being taken away from Kogarah Police Statio Picture

Former detective Glen McNamara’s car being taken away from Kogarah Police Statio Picture Craig Greenhill 

Police have seized CCTV footage from Mick’s Meat on Arab St which shows Mr Gao getting out of his white Nissan Silvia sedan and getting into a white Ford Falcon around 1.40pm, Tuesday. It shows him carrying a bag which police allege contained the ice.

A silver Ford Falcon allegedly belonging to Rogerson, who was known during his lengthy police career as “The Dodger”, can be seen in a car park in the foreground.

McNamara, a former Kings Cross detective who quit the force in 1990, was arrested at around 6.30pm on Sunday after his vehicle was stopped in Kyeemagh.

At his home in Cronulla, police seized a blue Ford Falcon XR6 and a number of other “items of interest to investigators”, police said.

McNamara’s white Ford Falcon station wagon was also seized as well as a boat allegedly belonging to him, which was being kept in a storage unit in Caringbah.

Officers searched Rogerson’s home at Padstow Heights and took away a silver Ford Falcon station wagon.

McNamara did not apply for bail during a short appearance before magistrate Christine Haskett in Kogarah Local Court yesterday. He was charged with murdering Jamie Gao between 1.40pm and 2.30pm in Padstow on May 20 and supplying 3kg of methamphetamine at the same time on the same date. He was not required to plea.

Ms Haskett granted a request by McNamara’s lawyer that he be put in protective custody. McNamara smiled at a small group of supporters believed to be his family.

IS THIS SCENE OF GAO’S MURDER?

The The self storage units where Jamie Gao is believed to have been killed

STAFF at the Padstow storage facility where Jamie Gao is believed to have been murdered say there was nothing unusual on the afternoon he was killed.

Detectives contacted the storage business, just 600 metres from where Gao went missing at 1.40pm on Tuesday, May 20, early Thursday morning.

They met with staff at 2.30am and walked around the 510 unit business for 30 minutes before requesting the CCTV hard drive.

Detectives returned later that morning and seized the footage for the previous two weeks.

The business told the Daily Telegraph it had not been contacted since.

A senior manager said he was unaware of forensic officers establishing a crime scene in a unit since Thursday.

He said police had not told them Gao was murdered on their site and detectives were “vague” when they visited the site.

Police said following Glen McNamara’s arrest on Sunday Gao was allegedly killed in a storage unit close to where he was last seen.

The site has more than 30 cameras and between 15 to 50 customers visit it each day.

“They said they were looking into a missing person possibly being held for ransom. We provided the CCTV to police,” the manager said.

“If it (a murder) was done it was without us knowing. There was nothing out of the blue that caught our attention.”

People who rent storage units need to provide government issued photo identification or can rent a unit through a business.

The manager said the sound-proofing of the units was equivalent to a garage.

“If someone was screaming you’d only hear it if you were walking past,” he said.

Investigators also visited a Bansktown storage facility, 2kms north of where Gao was last seen at McDonald’s, on Friday.

“They said they were checking storage facilities and were looking for a body,” a staff member said.

A third storage facility in Revesby refused to say if police had visited them over the last week.

On Monday detectives spent more than an hour inside Mick Meat’s on Arab Rd, where Gao was last seen getting out of his car, talking to staff.

Gao’s car was found by police around the corner on Stuart St after two Asian men who arrived with Gao returned hours after he went missing and moved it.

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