Gerard Baden-Clay Appeal 7th August 2015


Mountains of stuff on here about the tragic death of Allison by her husband Gerard Baden Clay. To catch up here is a link to posts tagged with Allison below

ALSO feel free to use the menu up top to get the full picture.

Reserved for appeal hearing and discussion

Appeal begins for Gerard Baden-Clay

Lawyers for Gerard Baden-Clay will argue his conviction was ‘unreasonable’

LAWYERS for Gerard Baden-Clay will today argue that his conviction for the murder of his wife Allison Baden-Clay should be quashed on the grounds it was ‘unreasonable’.

12.25pm: The appeal hearing has finished and the three judges have reserved their decision. They will give a written judgement, expected within three months.

12.23pm: Mr Copley, for Baden-Clay, said Allison’s blood in her car could have been from “some innocent incident” on another day.

12.21pm: Justice Catherine Holmes put to Mr Byrne the scenario that there had been an argument between Baden-Clay and his wife and that she had fallen, hit her head and died and that he had panicked.

“What’s wrong with that as a reasonable hypothesis,” Justice Holmes said.

Mr Byrne said the trial judge left murder open to the jury because there was such a long period of denials by Baden-Clay including his lengthy court testimony. Mr Byrne has concluded his arguments and defence barrister Michael Copley is addressing the court again.

12.05pm: Michael Byrne QC, the Acting Director of Public Prosecutions said the evidence suggested it was likely Allison was put in the third row of seating of her Holden Captiva and transported to Kholo Creek Bridge after a fatal attack.

“It’s a short series of dots to connect the proposition he drove her there but it is still not one that needed to be proven beyond reasonable doubt.”

He added that if the jury inferred the blood in her car was from after the fatal attack, it indicated there had been an injury to hide that may have been undetectable due to decomposition.

Olivia Walton, center, sister of convicted murderer Gerard Baden-Clay arrives at court wi

Olivia Walton, center, sister of convicted murderer Gerard Baden-Clay arrives at court with defence lawyer Penny White. Source: News Corp Australia

11.55am: Mr Byrne said the lack of conclusive opinion from experts on the finer scratches did not affect the jury’s ability to reach their verdict.

Moving on to the other defence arguments, Mr Byrne went through some of the key evidence against Baden-Clay.

He said the former real estate agent must have known of the possibility his wife and mistress would meet at a conference they were both to attend on the day he reported her missing.

“There are scratches to his face that were not there on the 19th (the day before she was reported missing).

“There is the leaf litter which is in our submission significant.”

The fact there were six different types of leaf all of which could be found in or adjacent to the couple’s property was a telling feature, he said.

When all the factors were put together, it was not necessary for the Crown to show Baden-Clay moved his wife’s body to the bridge for a murder verdict to be open.

11.44am: Gerard’s defence barrister has concluded his arguments and Michael Byrne QC, the Acting Director of Public Prosecutions, has begun addressing the court about the Crown case.

Mr Byrne, addressing the defence grounds for the appeal, said there had been evidence the broader marks on Baden-Clay’s face were older than the finer injuries.

It was open for the jury to accept the broader marks were from fingernails and the finer marks from a razor at a later time, and to infer Baden-Clay had attempted to disguise the scratch marks.

11.32am: Allison Baden-Clay’s death could have been from an unintentional killing arising out of an argument, making a murder conviction unreasonable, her husband Gerard’s defence barrister has told the court.

The argument could have been related to his affair with former staffer Toni McHugh and may have escalated to violence, resulting in the scratches on Baden-Clay’s face.

He was then left with a “dead wife”, and the situation of people knowing about the affair and his promises to Ms McHugh that he would leave his wife by July 1.

“And he’s panicked,” Mr Copley said.

“A jury could not rationally conclude he murdered his wife based on the fact he told a lie about how the injuries were inflicted.

“The possibility is open that everything he did in the days after the killing was attributable to panic.”

11.22am: Continuing his argument that the verdict was unreasonable, defence barrister Michael Copley said the couple’s daughters had not heard any screaming or fighting on the night and no blood was found in the house.

“There were scratches to his face but the contention is and was those scratches don’t reveal anything at all about the intention that he had when he was engaged in some sort of (altercation) with his wife.”

The scratches revealed only that Allison was “close enough” to inflict them and that there was some sort of altercation.

The “fact the doctor can’t determine the cause of death” was strongly in favour of a conclusion the death was other than intentional.

Prosecutors had argued the scratches were inflicted by Allison in self-defence “fighting for her life”.

But there were other possible explanations including that they were inflicted in anger or in the course of a struggle, Mr Copley said.

There was nothing to show if Alison had scratched her husband at the start or an argument or during the middle, with all possibilities open.

11.13am: The defence says the prosecution had asserted there was an accumulation of pressures on Baden-Clay, including from his long-running affair with his former staffer Toni McHugh.

But the evidence did not support that Baden-Clay was going to leave his wife, Mr Copley said.

“He told his wife in 2010 he no longer loved her. But…he didn’t act on the absence of love.

“He stayed in the marriage.”

The affair with Ms McHugh was discovered in 2011 and Baden-Clay still stayed at the home.

“The notion he was moving towards a departure from his wife is not sustainable.”

Prosecutors had also cited the business pressures on Baden-Clay and the fact he had borrowed money from friends and not paid them back.

“Sure there were financial pressures but my contention … is that hadn’t increased dramatically. That hadn’t changed substantially.”

11am: Baden-Clay’s defence barrister has told the court the murder conviction was unreasonable.

“What evidence was there that elevated the case from an unlawful killing to one of an unintentional killing?” Mr Copley said.

He said a premeditated killing had not been alleged, with prosecutors stating “there was uncharacteristic conduct engaged in by my client”.

There was no evidence of prior violence in the relationship and no evidence either party were abusers of illicit drugs or alcohol, he said.

10.50am: The next element of the appeal was that the jury should have been directed they needed to be satisfied beyond reasonable doubt Baden-Clay put his wife’s body at the creek where she was found, before they could rely on that conduct as capable of proving he killed his wife.

Justice Holmes asked Mr Copley: “How do you get there?”

“Why couldn’t you come to the conclusion he was the killer without needing to know how it was the body arrived at the creek?” Justice Holmes said.

“Why couldn’t he have called someone … to aid him to take the body away?”

Gerard Baden-Clay’s father Nigel arrives at court.

Gerard Baden-Clay’s father Nigel arrives at court. Source: News Corp Australia

10.45am: Before moving on to the other grounds of the appeal, Mr Copley concluded that experts had not agreed definitively that the smaller marks on Baden-Clay’s face were caused at a different time and by a different implement.

The jury had been invited to infer guilt from evidence which had not been established, he said.

“The evil of that is for all we know the leading of that circumstance could have … tipped the balance in favour of a verdict of guilt in the minds of some or all of the members of the jury. We just don’t know.”

10.30am: In terms of the timing of when the facial injuries occurred, an expert gave evidence at the trial that he could not separate the various injuries from photos, Mr Copley said,

“If the experts couldn’t say whether those injuries … had been inflicted at a different time … how could the jury have been capable of resolving (the matter)?”

The prosecution had to show the injuries on Baden-Clay’s face were inflicted at different times and by a different implement, otherwise there wasn’t a disguising element, he said.

Justice Catherine Holmes suggested both sides agreed at trial that the smaller red marks on Baden-Clay’s face were razor marks, as Gerard had said he cut himself shaving.

10:20am: Defence barrister Michael Copley QC opened the appeal by discussing injuries on Baden-Clay’s face.

He said prosecutors left it to the jury to conclude he tried to disguise scratches on his face by making further smaller injuries with a razor, and that this was evidence he had murdered his wife.

He says the evidence didn’t establish that the smaller marks on Baden-Clay’s face were made at a different time than larger scratches.

Gerard Baden-Clay’s sister Olivia Walton (centre) arrives at court with defence lawyers P

Gerard Baden-Clay’s sister Olivia Walton (centre) arrives at court with defence lawyers Peter Shields and Penny White. Source: News Corp Australia

Earlier: At least 150 people have gathered in the public gallery of the Banco court, a half an hour before Gerard Baden-Clay’s appeal.

Geoff and Priscilla Dickie, Allison Baden-Clay’s parents, are in the front row with s large family contingent wearing yellow ribbons.

 Gerard Baden-Clay: Court of Appeal reserves decision over murder conviction

7th August 2015

Allison Baden-Clay and Gerard Baden-Clay

The Court of Appeal in Brisbane has reserved its decision on a challenge against Gerard Baden-Clay’s murder conviction.

Lawyers appealing against Baden-Clay’s life sentence, with a 15-year non-parole period, for the murder of his wife Allison Baden-Clay in 2012 today said it was possible he unintentionally killed her.

The appeal decision will be handed down at a later date.

Ms Baden-Clay’s parents, Geoff and Priscilla Dickie, were among the 200 people present in court as legal counsel for the former real estate agent appeal on four grounds, namely that:

  • The verdict of murder was unreasonable;
  • A miscarriage of justice occurred because the jury was not directed on evidence relating to the presence of Allison’s blood in the car;
  • The trial judge erred in law in not directing the jury over evidence relating to the placement of Allison’s body at Kholo Creek;
  • The trial judge also erred in leaving to the jury that Baden-Clay attempted to disguise marks on his face by making razor cuts.

Barrister Michael Copley QC, who alongside high-profile solicitor Peter Shields, was representing Baden-Clay, argued the fourth appeal ground first.

There’re no injuries on the body consistent with an intentional killing.

Michael Copley QC, representing Gerard Baden-Clay

Police had noticed scratches on the right-hand side of Baden-Clay’s face when they visited the family’s rented Brookfield home in response to his triple-0 call in April 2012.

Baden-Clay insisted he had cut himself shaving, but experts told the court during the six-week trial, they were more “typical of fingernail scratches” not “a razor blade injury”.

Mr Copley questioned the crown’s claim that scratches on Baden-Clay’s face were signs of Allison fighting for her life.

He said the scratches revealed that Allison had been close enough to scratch her husband and that their relationship was not in good shape.

But he said the marks did not reveal why she scratched him.

Mr Copley said there were no injuries on Allison’s body consistent with an intentional killing, which he said favoured an unintentional killing.

“A jury could not rationally conclude that he murdered his wife based upon the fact he told a lie about how the injuries were inflicted,” he said.

“There’re no injuries on the body consistent with an intentional killing.”

Earlier in the appeal hearing, Mr Copley argued that experts could not say whether two sets of marks on Baden-Clay’s face occurred at different times or were made by different implements, yet the jury was asked to do so.

“The jury was invited to infer a path of guilt to murder on the basis of conduct the evidence did not establish the appellant engaged in,” Mr Copley said.

Prosecutor Michael Byrne, who was acting for the Crown, said an expert did testify at trial that marks to Baden-Clay’s face were done at different times and open to the jury to consider.

He said medical witnesses were entitled to use their common sense and experience, and jurors were entitled to decide for themselves.

Mr Byrne said a lack of conclusive evidence from the experts was not prohibitive for the jury to act on.

‘No evidence that there had ever been violence between the parties’

In arguing the first point of the appeal, that the verdict of murder was unreasonable, Mr Copley said: “There was no evidence in this case that there had ever been violence between the parties.”

Mr Copley said part of the Crown’s argument at trial was that pressure from Baden-Clay’s mistress contributed to Allison’s death.

He said evidence in regard to Baden-Clay’s intentions concerning his wife and mistress were at best equivocal.

He said the notion that Baden-Clay was moving towards a departure from his wife was not sustainable from evidence at trial.

Mr Copley then moved on to financial pressures.

“Sure there were financial pressures … but they hadn’t increased substantially, they hadn’t changed dramatically,” he said.

Allison Baden-Clay was last seen on April 19, 2012.

Her husband reported her missing the next day, sparking a major police and SES search.

Ten days later her body was found on the banks of the Kholo Creek at Anstead.

Suspicion centred on Baden-Clay but it was not until nearly seven weeks later he was arrested and charged.

He has always maintained his innocence.

Baden-Clay was not at today’s hearing.

He remains at Wolston Correctional Centre where he has been since last year’s sentencing.

More on this story:

  • Baden-Clay launches appeal against murder conviction
  • Allison Baden-Clay’s family detail their pain and devastation
  • Allison Baden-Clay murder: family members detail pain and devastation in statements to court

    Timeline: Baden-Clay murder trial

    By Josh Bavas and staff

    Tue 15 Jul 2014, 2:53pm

    Former Brisbane real estate agent Gerard Baden-Clay has been found guilty of murdering his wife Allison in April 2012.

    Her body was found on a creek bank 10 days after her husband reported her missing from their home in nearby Brookfield.

    Baden-Clay was charged with murdering his wife and interfering with a corpse, pleading not guilty to both charges.

    And so began a month-long trial involving hundreds of witness statements and garnering massive public interest.

    Take a look back at how Allison Baden-Clay’s disappearance and the resulting murder trial unfolded.

    April 20, 2012

    Gerard Baden-Clay calls police about 7:30am to report his wife missing.

    Police seek public help to find 43-year-old Allison Baden-Clay, reported missing since the previous night.

    Authorities say she was last seen at her house on Brookfield Road wearing grey tracksuit pants and a dark top.

    April 22, 2012

    Inspector Mark Laing confirms Gerard Baden-Clay crashed his car into a bus terminal outside Indooroopilly Shopping Centre.

    April 23, 2012

    A major incident room is set up at Indooroopilly police station for investigation into Allison Baden-Clay’s disappearance.

    Her parents make a public appeal for help to find their daughter.

    Allison’s mother Priscilla Dickie makes an emotional plea to the media.

    “Please, please help us to find our dear Allison,” she said.

    Police ask local residents to search their properties for even the smallest piece of information.

    Superintendent Mark Ainsworth says Allison Baden-Clay’s disappearance is being treated as a missing person case; not a criminal investigation.

    He says Gerard Baden-Clay is not a person of interest.

    Allison Baden-Clay’s father Geoff Dickie praises efforts of police and SES in trying to locate his daughter over the previous weekend.

    “We are overwhelmed by the support in trying to locate Allison,” he said.

    “Please help us because there are three beautiful little girls – of Allison’s – wanting to see their mother as soon as possible.”

    April 24, 2012

    Gerard Baden-Clay speaks to the media outside his house.

    “I’m trying to look after my children at the moment, we’ve got three young girls. We really trust that the police are doing everything they can to find my wife,” he said.

    April 26, 2012

    A prayer vigil is held for Allison.

    Reverend Beverley Bell from the Anglican Parish of Kenmore says it is a difficult time for the community.

    “Just not knowing what’s happened and there’s that sense of helplessness; what can we do?” he said.

    Detectives seize bags of material from the Baden-Clay house and Gerard Baden-Clay’s office.

    April 27, 2012

    Brisbane police step up efforts to find Allison Baden-Clay by setting up a mannequin outside her family home at Brookfield.

    The mannequin is wearing clothing similar to what the 43-year-old was in when she was last seen by her husband.

    Emergency crews widen their search area.

    April 28, 2012

    Allison Baden-Clay has been missing for more than a week.

    Police say they still have few leads despite the major investigation.

    Gerard Baden-Clay releases a brief statement to media thanking the public for their support, saying his priority is the welfare of his wife and their three daughters.

    April 30, 2012

    A canoeist discovers a woman’s body on a creek bank under Kholo Bridge Crossing at Anstead in Brisbane’s west, 11 days after Allison Baden-Clay disappeared.

    Police remove the body and confirm they are now treating Allison Baden-Clay’s disappearance as a homicide investigation.

    Investigators wait for formal identification.

    Superintendent Mark Ainsworth says police are taking seriously the possibility that the body belongs to Allison Baden-Clay and her family is notified.

    “They’re devastated. You can’t explain it any other way,” he said.

    Police appeal for information from anyone who may have seen anything in the area the night she disappeared, including either of the family’s cars.

    May 1, 2012

    Police confirm the body found is that of Allison Baden-Clay.

    Superintendent Mark Ainsworth says her death is officially being treated as a murder investigation.

    “At this stage we are looking at an unlawful homicide investigation – we have been looking at that for some time now; we believe it has reached that level some time ago,” he said.

    Gerard Baden-Clay says he is devastated by the loss of his wife.

    In a statement released by his lawyer, Baden-Clay says his primary concern now is the care of his three daughters.

    He says he just wants to provide his children with some stability and normality given the tragic news and despite “the unrelenting media barrage”.

    A few kilometres away at Kenmore, Baden-Clay’s parents emerge from their home and lower their Australian flag to half mast.

    Neighbours do the same before they all hug each other in grief.

    Meanwhile, a SIM card is discovered in bushland near the search area.

    May 2, 2012

    Police say they are confident they will find the killer of Allison Baden-Clay.

    Investigators say a mobile phone SIM card found at the scene has no link to the case.

    Police say a post-mortem examination on the body will determine the next phase of the investigation.

    Gerard Baden-Clay asks the media for privacy and to let police do their investigations.

    May 10, 2012

    Police are stationed at a roundabout near the Baden-Clays’ Brookfield home.

    Police set up a roadblock on Brookfield Road and speak to drivers, hoping to glean information which may help with their investigation.

    Detectives want to hear from anyone driving in the area the night before Allison Baden-Clay was reported missing.

    May 11, 2012

    A funeral service is held at St Paul’s Anglican Church at Ipswich, west of Brisbane.

    Hundreds of mourners come to pay their respects, including Allison’s immediate family and husband Gerard Baden-Clay.

    Her sister Vanessa Fowler says there are still many questions left unanswered about the circumstances surrounding the 43-year-old’s death.

    “We, your family, pledge to you that we will have these questions answered. We will bring you justice because you deserve nothing less,” she said.

    “Allison, your loss has been felt throughout the entire country by people who do not know you.”

    Mourners are asked to donate to an appeal to support the Baden-Clays’ three young daughters.

    The cause of her death remains unknown.

    May 18, 2012

    Police again say they are confident they will make an arrest over her murder, four weeks after she was reported missing by her husband.

    Police say the killing was not random and the killer was known to Allison but they are yet to make an arrest.

    It is believed police are still awaiting autopsy and toxicology results to confirm her cause of death.

    May 25, 2012

    Police say they are continuing to examine a wide range of evidence.

    May 29, 2012

    Detectives investigating receive the toxicology results but will not release them publicly.

    June 13, 2012

    Gerard Baden-Clay talks to police at the Indooroopilly police station for several hours.

    His lawyers say he is expected to be charged with her murder later tonight. They say he is devastated and will vigorously defend the charge.

    Baden-Clay tells police Allison disappeared after going for a late night walk from their home.

    He is remanded in custody, formally interviewed and charged with murder and interfering with a corpse.

    June 14, 2012

    Gerard Baden-Clay appears in Brisbane Magistrates Court charged with murder, about two months after first reporting his wife missing.

    Prosecution grants a forensic order to allow police to obtain a DNA sample from him.

    His lawyers say the charges will be vigorously defended, and lodge a bail application in the Supreme Court.

    Residents around Brookfield tell the media of their shock.

    June 21, 2012

    Gerard Baden-Clay’s bail application begins in the Supreme Court.

    June 22, 2012

    Gerard Baden-Clay loses his bail application in the Supreme Court with Justice David Boddice saying the accused posed a significant flight risk.

    Prosecutor Danny Boyle earlier argued that Baden-Clay had a financial motive for killing his wife and also cited entries in Allison’s journal suggest the couple may have discussed an affair he had been having with a co-worker.

    Mr Baden-Clay’s barrister, Peter Davis SC, says the Crown’s case is circumstantial and weak.

    June 24, 2012

    A fundraiser is held for Baden-Clay’s three daughters.

    Mike Kaye from the Brookfield Uniting Cricket Club says the fundraiser is important to the family.

    “It’s an opportunity for Allison’s parents Geoff and Priscilla and brothers and sisters to thank the community for their support and also for all those who were out there searching,” he said.

    July 9, 2012

    The case returns to Brisbane Magistrates Court for a hearing.

    Magistrate Chris Callaghan says he is “flabbergasted” upon hearing it will take five months for police to fully examine the financial affairs of Gerard Baden-Clay.

    The court hears there will be 330 statements tendered to the defence but the prosecution says it will not have a forensic accountant’s report until November.

    The prosecution has been ordered to provide most of the brief of evidence to Baden-Clay’s lawyers within six weeks.

    September 3, 2012

    The matter returns to court where Baden-Clay’s lawyers express frustration that prosecutors still have not provided them with all of the witness statements.

    Prosecutor Danny Boyle tells the court 446 witness statements have already been provided to defence team but five statements, described as crucial, remain outstanding.

    The prosecution is ordered to provide outstanding documents by the end of the week.

    September 5, 2012

    A Supreme Court Judge, Justice Glenn Martin, gives Allison’s father Geoffrey James Dickie temporary control of her estate, including her life insurance policy.

    If Baden-Clay is acquitted of his wife’s murder he will resume his role as executor of her will.

    If he is convicted, Allison’s parents will be able to go back to court for a permanent order granting them control of their daughter’s estate.

    December 14, 2012

    Gerard Baden-Clay’s defence lawyer lodges a bail application in Supreme Court for the second time.

    His lawyer argues the Crown case has been weakened by the results of a post-mortem examination.

    They say it shows Allison Baden-Clay had traces of an anti-depressant drug in her blood – leaving open the possibility that she took her own life.

    But Justice Peter Applegarth dismisses the application, ruling there was no material change of circumstances and the strength of Crown case was unaffected by the results.

    February 6, 2013

    The Federal Court orders nearly $800,000 from two life insurance policies for Allison Baden-Clay will be held in trust by the court.

    Justice John Dowsett agrees the court should hold the money until after Gerard Baden-Clay faces trial.

    March 11-20, 2013

    Gerard Baden-Clay’s committal hearing begins.

    The Crown alleges Baden-Clay killed his wife because he wanted her insurance payouts to clear his debts and to be with his mistress.

    The court hears his wife had suffered from depression and had used medication to cope and that her marriage was troubled.

    Witnesses tell the court about hearing a woman yell the night Allison disappeared.

    A forensic expert says he believes injuries to Gerard Baden-Clay, which were photographed by police after he reported his wife missing, were caused by fingernail scratches.

    Allison’s friend Kerry Anne Walker is the first of more than 40 witnesses to testify.

    Queensland MP Dr Bruce Flegg tells the court he heard a woman scream on the night before Allison was reported missing.

    Speaking outside the court, Dr Flegg explains his decision not to report it to police that night, saying: “There was nothing to suggest it would be a criminal or police related matter.”

    Dr Flegg says he has known Gerard Baden-Clay “for a long time”.

    A senior Queensland Health forensic expert says some of Baden-Clay’s facial injuries may have been scratch marks but says it is possible some were caused by shaving.

    Two former real estate partners testify Baden-Clay was in debt and was warned to leave his wife or mistress or he would lose their business association.

    Queensland Police Service forensic accountant Kelly Beckett tells court Gerard Baden-Clay’s net financial position was about $70,000 and he owed more than $300,000 to family and friends.

    Baden-Clay’s former mistress Toni McHugh tells the court he told her to lay low in the days after his wife’s disappearance and that he could not afford a divorce.

    His lawyer says he is determined to clear his name.

    Outside court, Baden-Clay’s sister Olivia Walton defends her brother after speaking to the media for the first time.

    “Gerard is an innocent man and I’m here because I continue to support him,” she said.

    Outside court, Baden-Clay’s lawyer Darren Mahony says he believes the cross-examination of 40 witnesses went in his client’s favour.

    “We’re of the view that the evidence against Mr Baden-Clay has been significantly weakened by cross-examination during the court process,” he said.

    December 19, 2013

    Supreme Court Justice James Douglas argues marriage counsellor Ms Carmel Ritchie from Relationships Australia should give evidence at a pre-trial hearing about anything said during counselling sessions.

    Ms Ritchie tries to prevent evidence from the sessions being used in court, arguing it is protected by confidentiality provisions of the Family Law Act.

    February 3-4, 2014

    Gerard Baden-Clay’s re-trial hearing begins in Supreme Court.

    The court hears from pathologist Dr Nathan Milne who conducted the autopsy on Allison Baden-Clay.

    Counsellor Carmel Ritchie also gives evidence, saying Allison told her she had taken an anti-malarial tablet during her honeymoon that had caused psychotic episodes, depression and panic attacks.

    Ms Ritchie tells the court Allison spoke of: her husband’s affair with an employee; how she had confronted him when she found out; and he was now honest and taking responsibility.

    Ms Ritchie also speaks of a separate counselling session with Gerard Baden-Clay where they discussed the affair.

    June 2, 2014

    The pre-trial hearing continues.

    The court hears potential jurors will be polled prior to their selection and will be asked:

  1. If they or their immediate family lived in Anstead, Bellbowrie, Brookfield or Chapel Hill in April 2012;
  2. If they have ever contributed funds relating to the disappearance or death of Allison Baden-Clay;
  3. Whether they have ever expressed a view as to the guilt or innocence of Gerard Baden-Clay.
  • June 9, 2014

    A jury of seven men and five women, plus three reserves, is selected.

    June 10, 2014

    The murder trial begins.

    Gerard Baden-Clay officially pleads not guilty in the Supreme Court to murdering his wife more than two years ago.

    Justice John Byrne tells jury members to ignore all media coverage of the case during the next four weeks.

    July 9, 2014

    After a month-long trial, the prosecution and the defence finish wrapping up their final arguments.

    Justice John Byrne begins summing up the case for the jurors.

    July 15, 2014

    Baden-Clay is found guilty of murder.

Flowers for Allison, may justice has been served

Flowers for Allison, may justice has been served

Appeal date set August 7 2015 for Gerard Baden-Clay over murder of wife Allison

Many hundred pages and thousands of comments have been made about GBC on this site. Use the Menu up top follow the history folks or start here…

May 19, 2015

Gerard Baden-Clay will appeal his conviction over his wife Allison’s murder in August.

The Queensland Court of Appeal has confirmed the year’s most hotly anticipated hearing will take place on August 7.

A jury convicted the former prestige real estate agent of his wife’s murder following a high profile trial last year.

Police photograph of Gerard Baden-Clay.Police photograph of Gerard Baden-Clay. Photo: Supplied

He was sentenced to life in prison with a non-parole period of 15 years.

Mrs Baden-Clay’s body was found under the Kholo Creek Bridge 11 days after her husband reported her missing on April 19, 2012.

Gerard Baden-Clay has always maintained he is innocent of his wife’s murder.

Following a 21 day trial in the Supreme Court of Queensland last year, Baden-Clay was found guilty of killing his wife at their home in the leafy western Brisbane suburb of Brookfield.

Her body was dumped about 14 kilometres away, on the banks of Kholo Creek at Anstead.

Baden-Clay’s trial heard he was embroiled in an affair with his long-time mistress Toni McHugh and was under significant financial pressure, owing hundreds of thousands of dollars to friends, family and ex-business partners at the time of his wife’s disappearance.

His murder conviction marked a dramatic fall from grace for the former real estate agent, who prided himself on his lineage as the great-grandson of famed Scouts movement founder Lord Robert Baden-Powell.

His lawyers lodged an appeal two days after the guilty verdict was returned.

Baden-Clay claimed he was the victim of a “miscarriage of justice”, in the appeal papers lodged by his solicitor Peter Shields.

He has appealed his conviction on four grounds, including that the verdict of murder was “unreasonable”, because the jury was incorrectly directed about evidence relating to blood found in the boot of Mrs Baden-Clay’s four-wheel-drive.

“A miscarriage of justice occurred because the jury should have been, but was not, directed that the presence of the deceased’s blood in a motor vehicle was only relevant if the jury was satisfied beyond reasonable doubt that the presence of the blood was attributable to an injury sustained to the deceased’s body on the evening of 19 April 2012, or the morning of 20 April 2012,” the application reads.

Baden-Clay has also claimed that presiding judge Justice John Byrne misdirected the jury about the injuries which appeared on his face on the morning he reported his wife missing, as well as evidence relating to the discovery of Mrs Baden-Clay’s body on the banks of Kholo Creek at Anstead.

“The trial judge erred in law in not directing the jury that they needed to be satisfied beyond reasonable doubt that the appellant placed the body of the deceased at Kholo Creek in order to use such a finding as post-offence conduct going to guilt,” the application says.

“The trial judge erred in leaving to the jury that the appellant attempted to disguise marks on his face by marking razor cuts.”

The prosecution alleged Baden-Clay cut his right cheek with a razor in a failed attempt to disguise the scratch marks his wife had left on his face while fighting for her life.

Baden-Clay has maintained the injuries on his face were shaving cuts, but four forensic experts told his trial the abrasions were more consistent with fingernail scratches.

Baden-Clay’s trial, and his eventual conviction, was one of the biggest news events of 2014.

The father-of-three wept and shook violently after the seven men and five women of the jury delivered their guilty verdict.

His three young daughters with Allison, who are now being cared for by her parents, were not in court to hear the jury foreman declare their father guilty of their mother’s murder.

In February, it emerged the three girls remain unable to access their mother’s dual life insurance policies, collectively valued at nearly $800,000, until their father exhausts his legal avenues to have his conviction overturned.


Toni McHugh-Who are You? Go away now

Courtesy of Australian Women’s Weekly…

Toni McHugh: ‘My future with Gerard included his children’

Wednesday, July 30, 2014

The mistress of convicted wife-killer Gerard Baden-Clay believed she would eventually build a life with him and his three young daughters.

In an exclusive interview with The Australian Women’s Weekly, Toni McHugh has opened up about how she and the now convicted murderer had high hopes of setting up house together and getting shared custody of his children.

McHugh, who was engaged in a four year affair with Baden-Clay when he violently killed his wife of 14 years,  Allison Baden-Clay, says she always considered the couple’s children when they discussed a life together.

“The future I was planning with Gerard, it actually included them. It included Allison! I thought we would all get to the point where we all, you know, shared custody, like adults and got on,” she told The Weekly.

Related: Gerard Baden-Clay’s secret life of betrayal revealed

The former real estate salesperson also shared unsettling details about the moment she came close to Allison’s body.

“We drove over that bridge, and she was under there, and later that day, maybe around noon, we heard a woman’s body has been found, and I knew straight away – instantly – that it was Allison,” Ms McHugh said.

When asked whether or not she felt responsible for Allison’s untimely death, McHugh, who describes herself as ‘Australia’s Monica Lewinsky’ – the most famous White House intern in history, said ‘No’.

Related: Gerard Baden-Clay’s colleague tells: ‘I was working with a murderer’

“It is horrible to have it said that you are the motive (for murder),” she said.

“But no, I’m sorry, he wasn’t thinking about me. He was thinking about himself.”

While McHugh admits she’s still trying to come to terms with what’s happened, she is now planning to write a book about the case.

“I’m the only one who can tell this story,” she said.

Gerard Baden-Clay was sentenced to life in prison with a minimum of 15 years behind bars for killing Allison and dumping her body in Brisbane’s Kholo Creek.

Read more of this story in the August issue of The Australian Women’s Weekly. 

Wear Yellow for Allison Baden-Clay Day August 1st 2014

On Friday 1st August it’s Wear Yellow for Allison Baden-Clay Day  This day is not about raising money. Instead Allison’s friends and family asks you to wear some yellow and perform an act of kindness (big or small) in memory of Allison.

If you wish to donate money to The Late Allison Baden-Clay Children’s Trust Fund, you can do so using these details 

Donate to the Baden-Clay children | BSB: 084 737 | Account Number: 943 084 078.

I will also include information on how to send cards of support and condolences to Allisons family shortly


Gerard Baden-Clay Appeals against Murder Conviction

SLAIN Queensland mother Allison Baden-Clay’s life insurance payout will go to a legal trust while her husband awaits the appeal of his murder conviction.

Today, the Federal Court ordered the sum of Allison’s TAL Life Limited policy — worth more than $412,000 in 2013 — be paid to the trust of solicitors representing her father, the estate’s executor.

It will be held in the trust account pending the final outcome of Gerard Baden-Clay’s pending appeal of his murder conviction.

The life insurance policy was jointly held by Allison, 43, and her husband, Gerard Baden-Clay.

It was one of two that were frozen after Baden-Clay was charged with his wife’s murder in June 2012.

Last August, funds from a Suncorp Life and Superannuation policy that was worth more than $347,000 in 2013 were ordered to be paid to Allison’s father’s representatives.

Allison’s parents, Geoff and Priscilla Dickie, are caring for the couple’s three daughters.

Baden-Clay, 44, tried to claim the insurance shortly after his wife’s body was found on a creek bank at Anstead in Brisbane’s west in April 2012.

After he was charged, the Federal Court became involved and froze the funds pending the outcome of criminal proceedings.

A former real estate agent, Baden-Clay was found guilty last July of murdering his wife at their Brookfield home in Brisbane and dumping her body.

Details of their marital breakdown, financial troubles and Baden-Clay’s infidelities were laid bare during the four-week trial.

Baden-Clay is serving a life sentence and will be eligible for parole in 2027.

Please NOTE This Community is too important to let any individual ruin it for others!

From now on, bullying in any form will result in ONE WARNING FROM ME (ROBBO) and 2nd time will result in an instant ban from the site.

We are here to discuss important things, not to make personal attacks. Admin (ROBBO) will be the one who determines whether or not a message is deemed as bullying or inappropriate. Thank you for your cooperation

(Robbo, owner and operator of aussiecriminals)

Just to lighten the mood, GBC needs reminding he was over confident before too! How wrong he was!

cop shop

update 20/07/14

GERARD Baden-Clay was wheeling and dealing behind bars to gain up to $2 million if he’d been acquitted of murdering his wife Allison.

The day before the remorseless killer was found guilty, he bragged to prison guards he would soon be a free man.

And he was set to be a wealthy one too.

Baden-Clay would have walked out to a media deal of at least $600,000, negotiated by his family as he awaited trial.

He also would have collected up to $1 million from his wife’s insurance policies and $440,000 from selling a Gold Coast investment property he had owned with his wife.

Behind the scenes, TV producers flew up to Brisbane to woo the Baden-Clays with huge sums of money if he walked and talked.


Allison Baden-Clay’s family make plea as Gerard’s lawyers launch appeal against murder conviction

9 hours ago July 18, 2014

WIFE-killer Gerard Baden-Clay is prolonging the agony of Allison’s family and friends, appealing his conviction just two days after being sentenced.

He claims the jury was “unreasonable” when they found him guilty of murdering his wife and that a “miscarriage of justice” had occurred.

The challenge will likely take more than six months to get to court.

Last night Allison’s family told of their anguish at the appeal.

“It’s been a difficult time for the family, just let her rest in peace,” one of Allison’s relatives said

Baden-Clay was condemned in court by Justice John Byrne for using his wife’s struggles with depression in an attempt to beat the murder charge.

Baden-Clay’s defence team of barrister Michael Byrne QC and solicitor Peter Shields filed the paperwork yesterday shortly before midday.

The appeal claimed a miscarriage of justice occurred because the jury should have been directed the presence of Allison Baden-Clay’s blood in her car was only relevant if the jury was satisfied beyond reasonable doubt it could only have got there from an injury that occurred on the night she died.

It also argued the trial judge should have directed the jury that they needed to be satisfied beyond reasonable doubt Baden-Clay took his wife’s body to Kholo Creek in order to use it as “post offence conduct going to guilt’’.

Baden-Clay’s legal team also claimed the judge should not have told the jury they could consider whether he had “attempted to disguise marks on his face’’ by making razor cuts.

Lawyers are given one month to lodge an appeal. It would then be listed for hearing in the Court of Appeal.

Appeal notices are usually subject to significant refinement before written outline of arguments are lodged closer to the hearing date.

When the matter makes it to the court, Baden-Clay will appear before a panel of three judges. His lawyers will outline why they believe the trial failed and the Crown will respond.

If he is successful, he could be acquitted or the case could be tried again.

update 12.35 17/07/14

Gerard Baden-Clay launches appeal against murder conviction

Lawyers for Gerard Baden-Clay have filed an appeal against his murder conviction.

On Tuesday a Supreme Court jury found the 43-year-old Brisbane man guilty of killing his wife Allison in April 2012.

He was sentenced to life in prison, with a non-parole period of 15 years.

An image of a bearded Gerard Baden-Clay that was tendered

He has appealed against his conviction on four grounds, including that the verdict of murder was unreasonable, and that:

“A miscarriage of justice occurred because the jury should have been, but was not, directed that the presence of the deceased’s blood in a motor vehicle was only relevant if the jury was satisfied beyond reasonable doubt that the presence of blood was attributed to an injury sustained to the deceased’s body on the evening of 19 April 2012 or the morning of 20 April 2012,” the application reads.

“The trial judge erred in law in not directing the jury that they needed to be satisfied beyond reasonable doubt that the appellant placed the body of the deceased at Kholo Creek in order to use such a finding as post-offence conduct going to guilt.

“The trial judge erred in leaving to the jury that the appellant attempted to disguise marks on his face by making razor cuts.”

Please NOTE This Community is too important to let any individual ruin it for others!

From now on, bullying in any form will result in ONE WARNING FROM ME (ROBBO) and 2nd time will result in an instant ban from the site.

We are here to discuss important things, not to make personal attacks. Admin (ROBBO) will be the one who determines whether or not a message is deemed as bullying or inappropriate. Thank you for your cooperation

(Robbo, owner and operator of aussiecriminals)


Who wants to be a unpaid crime blog reporter/contributer?

Not real journo’s who still have a job, maybe cadets (but not good for resume…mmm)

Maybe old school scribes who wish they could stay in the game!

How about folks like me with no relevant qualifications but gives a toss about the crimes in their communities?

The pay-off is a verdict like today GBC cowardly wife killer.

People like me? You relate to how I write?

Hey cant spell well, 2 finger typer…So am I YES…Our stuff gets checked before we post.

Sounds like you?

GOOD keep reading

This site has had massive coverage lately (I cover non famous crimes too)

I’m thinking along the lines of a Co-ordinator in each state

That co-ordinator runs that states crimes and has authors who get the stories up.

What do you think?

Sound good, bad, troublesome, confusing?

All I want is to give the best coverage of what is going on in our communities.

The community expectations has/have?  outgrown my skills honestly…

Each state, minimum deserves better coverage. The good people email me why haven’t you covered this rape, or that kidnapping, or the death of a cousin in my indigenous community.

You could help us!

Gerard Baden-Clay-What jury didn’t hear

Information about Allison’s autopsy released

Previously suppressed evidence involving testimony from the pathologist who did the autopsy on Allison Baden-Clay has now been released.

Dr Nathan Milne could not determine a cause of death for Allison in 2012, but noted three injuries which he concluded could have been the result of blunt force from an assault.

They included an abnormality to the head which may have been a subdural haemorrhage, bruising on the chest wall and a chipped tooth.

Dr Milne’s report said it was open to conclude that Allison was smothered or strangled, possibly with her jumper.

But in a pre-trial hearing in February, the defence applied to have some of Dr Milne’s evidence excluded because it was speculative or prejudicial.

Justice Peter Applegarth ruled his orders on the evidence not be published until the verdict.

July 16, 2014 – 6:15PM will be updated with bits highlighted by YELLOW

DETECTIVES bugged the flowers at Allison Baden-Clay’s funeral in an extraordinary bid to catch her husband confessing.

The lengths police went to in their investigation into Allison’s disappearance and death can now be revealed.

Police set the trap because they thought Gerard Baden-Clay might break down if he was alone with the coffin.

SPECIAL FEATURE: From dream life to suburban nightmare

KEY EVIDENCE: Cops knew this was face of a killer

DOUBLE LIFE: Baden-Clay’s asked woman to kill his wife

SHATTERED DREAMS: ‘I wanted to be Mrs Baden-Clay’

However the attempt failed when Baden-Clay arrived to the funeral late with his young daughters in tow. The bugging was one of a number of bids to trap Baden-Clay.

His every move was monitored during the investigation. Phone taps picked up conversations between him and Toni McHugh.

There were also reported sightings around the Kholo Creek area that may have indicated more than one person was involved but police could not substantiate them.

Gerard Baden-Clay at the funeral of Allison Baden-Clay.

Gerard Baden-Clay at the funeral of his wife Allison. Photographer: Liam Kidston Source: News Limited

Detectives searching for a breakthrough went far and wide in the investigation. Photos of Baden-Clay’s scratches were sent to the UK’s Serious Organised Crime Agency for advice and plant cuttings from the Baden-Clay residence were sent to South Australia.

Experts in Western Australia were consulted to eliminate death by drowning, and maggots were sent to Wollongong to determine their age.

A caterpillar expert was consulted about the marks on Baden-Clay’s neck and chest and a Queensland botanist played a key role in examining the leaves found in Allison’s hair.

Eventually detectives swooped on the Baden-Clay family in the days before his arrest in a final bid to extract more evidence.

A car similar to Allison Baden-Clay’s silver Captiva was recorded on CCTV at the Kenmore roundabout on the night she went missing.

Detectives could not identify the vehicle on the grainy footage so selected a range of vehicles with similar shapes and drove them to the roundabout at the same time of night to see if they matched.

They also stopped motorists on the chance a shift worker who regularly drove past might have seen one of the Baden-Clay cars or witnessed anything else relevant.

The exercises did not yield any significant evidence.

But ultimately it was the evidence on Baden-Clay himself the day he reported his wife missing that convicted him. The scratches on his face marked him as a murderer

GBC was looking for women on the world’s largest sex, dating and swingers site on New Year’s Eve 2010

“Looking for discrete (sic) sex,” Gerard Baden-Clay typed.

“Married but don’t want to be – looking for some sex on the side!”

It was New Year’s Eve 2010, and Gerard was starting early with a resolution to escape his suburban life. The wife he no longer loved. The mistress who wanted him to herself.

A long-time-married, long-time-cheating husband with much-forgotten marriage vows


Baden-Clay murder: Police won’t rule out reports Allison’s coffin was bugged in bid to catch killer

Updated Wed 16 Jul 2014, 7:50pm AEST

The hearse leaves the church

Photo: Queensland Police say “wide and varied strategies” were used to catch Allison Baden-Clay’s killer. (ABC/Supplied)

The former head of the Queensland Police homicide squad is not ruling out reports that Allison Baden-Clay’s coffin or flowers were bugged at her funeral in a bid to catch her killer.

Former real estate agent Gerard Baden-Clay was yesterday sentenced to life in prison after being found guilty of murdering his wife in 2012.

He reported her missing 10 days before her body was found on the bank of Kholo Creek in Brisbane.

Detective Superintendent Brian Wilkins, who headed the investigation into Allison’s murder, told 612 ABC Brisbane’s Steve Austin that police were immediately suspicious of Baden-Clay because his face was scratched and “things did not add up”.

He also said “wide and varied strategies” were used to gather evidence.

Austin: I’m interested in what “wide and varied” means. We’ve read that you went to such lengths as bugging either the flowers or the coffin of Allison Baden-Clay at the funeral in the hope of getting some sort of under-the-breath or private confession from Mr Baden-Clay, is that true?

Wilkins: I’m not in a position to talk about methodologies that we utilise. As I said the investigation is in relation to a very, very serious crime and the police will use whatever lawful tactic that we have to gather evidence to sustain a conviction and place a person before the court.

Austin: It’s been reported in today’s Courier-Mail newspaper – is that report accurate or inaccurate? About the bugging of elements of the funeral of Allison Baden-Clay.

Wilkins: As I said a vast array of investigative strategies are used and those investigative strategies are utilised in a lawful fashion and I don’t want to go into specific methodologies that were utilised.


Information about Allison’s autopsy released

Previously suppressed evidence involving testimony from the pathologist who did the autopsy on Allison Baden-Clay has now been released.

Dr Nathan Milne could not determine a cause of death for Allison in 2012, but noted three injuries which he concluded could have been the result of blunt force from an assault.

They included an abnormality to the head which may have been a subdural haemorrhage, bruising on the chest wall and a chipped tooth.

Dr Milne’s report said it was open to conclude that Allison was smothered or strangled, possibly with her jumper.

But in a pre-trial hearing in February, the defence applied to have some of Dr Milne’s evidence excluded because it was speculative or prejudicial.

Justice Peter Applegarth ruled his orders on the evidence not be published until the verdict.

Case was difficult to prove due to circumstantial evidence

Detective Superintendent Wilkins says cases based on circumstantial evidence are more challenging to prove when there are no witnesses and no admissions.

He says police were pleased with the verdict but were taken aback by the intense public interest in the case.

“I’ve been in the police for many years and involved in hundreds of homicide investigations and certainly it was the largest media contingent and certainly the largest public interest I’ve seen,” he said.

“I was involved in the Daniel Morcombe investigation. That had significant media and public interest, but it was nowhere near the media and public interest that we’ve recently viewed.”

Bruce Morcombe, whose 13 year old son Daniel was abducted and murdered in 2003, says it is crucial the Baden-Clay children are now given support.

“We feel so sad about those children – the extended family, particularly the children,” he said.

“You know they’ve not only lost mum but they’ve lost Dad as well. We hope and pray and whatever we can do within the Daniel Morcombe Foundation to support those kids we will do that for sure.”

There is no word yet on whether Baden-Clay will appeal against his conviction, but he has a month to do so.

Lawyer Justin Quill told the ABC that an appeal against the sentence is unlikely because of Queensland’s mandatory sentencing laws.

However, he said there is likely a number of grounds upon which his lawyers can appeal against the conviction.

“Those grounds could be the exclusion of particular pieces of evidence. It could be taking the judge to task on the precise wording of the charge or the answers to the questions. The answers to the questions are crucial,” he said.

GERARD Baden-Clay was visited by his parents as he spent his first day as a convicted murderer at Wolston Correctional Centre yesterday.

Nigel and Elaine Baden-Clay arrived at the jail about 2.30pm to visit their son, who sources said spent his first night alone inside the prison’s “jelly room”.

His parents arrived with a large envelope and stayed at the jail for about an hour.

After arriving on Tuesday night, Baden-Clay would have been strip searched, given new clothes, photographed for identification, interviewed and assessed by psychologists.

COURT MOVE: The evidence Baden-Clay didn’t want jury to hear

Convicted murderer Gerard Bayden-Clay's parents Nigel and Elaine Bayden-Clay visit their

Convicted murderer Gerard Bayden-Clay’s parents Nigel and Elaine Bayden-Clay visit their son in Wolston Correctional Centre, Wacol. Photographer: Liam Kidston.

He was allowed to phone his parents where he was reportedly emotional before being placed in a cell to undergo observation, where he will be monitored by nurses and psychologists.

Baden-Clay’s prison number.

Baden-Clay’s prison number.

Baden-Clay’s prison number.

Depending on his risk level he will continue to be monitored or watched remotely by camera before his final placement at the prison, which is filled with high-profile prisoners and sex offenders.

“They usually keep them in a safe area until they can assess their state of mind,” a prison source said.

“He would be considered a risk of self-harm or harm from others, originally.

“I think you can probably understand a lot of media attention can be positive or negative in the prison community.

“Jelly room – it’s a prison term – if someone is unstable and wobbly like jelly, that’s where they go.”

Upon arrival Baden-Clay would have been given an induction booklet describing the prison’s daily schedule and information about employment and medical services.

Family shares heartbreak of Allison’s loss 3:01

He would be entitled to work in the prison and receive a small daily wage of between $4.50 and $7.50 per day.

Jobs in jails include laundry, timber, metal, textiles, assembly and packing, painting and powder-coating work.

“Prisoners have the potential to earn up to $52.50 per week for work in a range of prisoner industries or other roles, such as cleaning prisoner common areas,” a Queensland Corrective Services statement said.

“Prisoners may purchase a small range of approved items from the prisoner canteen, including magazines and newspapers, food items, clothing and toiletries.”

Prison meals are generally served from about 4.30pm and morning headcount is conducted at about 6.45am.

Baden-Clay’s small cell would have a single bed, sink, toilet, shower and TV


The public’s fascination with Baden-Clay 1:56

The murder of Allison Baden-Clay reveals a sordid tale with young lives left in tatters.

“They don’t wear their own clothes, there are a lot of limits,” the official said.

“It’s a fairly austere life at the best of times.”

The Baden-Clay family gathered at the family home at Kenmore yesterday and were visited by defence solicitor Peter Shields.

“I won’t be making any comment. It’s difficult for everyone but I won’t be making any comment and neither will the family,” Mr Shields said.

“No I won’t be (saying how they’re feeling). I think sometimes some things just call for a dignified silence.” reporter

Police suspected Gerard Baden-Clay murdered his wife “very early in the piece” while Allison’s family will “grieve her tragic death forever”.

The murder trial of Gerard Baden-Clay may have never heard from the convicted killer if a ruling at a critical point of the case went the other way.

The seven men and five women of the jury were unaware Mr Baden-Clay’s defence team tried to have the murder charge against the former real estate dismissed the day before he stepped into the witness box.

But we were

The application could have changed the entire course of the trial.

The jury was also unaware that Mr Baden-Clay, a former prestige Brisbane real estate agent, secretly sold the Gold Coast home he owned with his wife to fund his legal battle from his prison cell.

The prosecution spoke of Mr Baden-Clay’s behaviour in the days and weeks after his wife’s disappearance, but could not speak of his time behind bars so as not to prejudice the jury.

Evidence heard during his failed bail application and his pre-trial hearing was also withheld from the jury at the trial.

The jury heard the Baden-Clays purchased a Paradise Point investment property.

But, it was not told that Mr Baden-Clay arranged, from his prison cell in the Arthur Gorrie Correctional Centre, for the investment property to be sold three months after being arrested for his wife’s murder.

The jury was also unaware Mr Baden-Clay remained in custody for the duration of the trial, having been deemed too great a flight risk and denied bail by the Supreme Court in 2012.

The Baden-Clays’ beach shack on Abalone Avenue was owned by the couple’s company World of Top Step Pty Ltd, of which Mr and Mrs Baden-Clay were both directors.

Mr Baden-Clay also applied, from his prison cell, to the Australian Securities and Investments Commission to have his late wife removed as director and secretary of WOTS. what a loving grieving husband, protecting his few dollars

The sale was revealed in Supreme Court documents relating to the control of Mrs Baden-Clay’s estate in September 2012.

Her father Geoff Dickie was awarded interim control of his late daughter’s estate in 2012, after arguing her assets should not be sold off or proceeds divided before her husband faced trial.

The grieving father, who with his wife is now caring for his three granddaughters, said he did not know the full value of his daughter’s estate.

“I did not know the full extent of the assets and liabilities of the estate because most documents relating to Allison’s financial affairs are held by the police,” he said in his affidavit.

Mrs Baden-Clay’s will was made in 1997, just before her marriage to Mr Baden-Clay and before she had any children.

In it she lists her future husband as the sole executor and benefactor of her will and appoints Mr Dickie as the executor if Mr Baden-Clay could not fulfil the obligations.

Mr Dickie will have to re-apply to take control of his daughter’s estate, although Mr Baden-Clay has been found guilty of her murder. amazing isn’t it?

The jury was also unaware of additional evidence raised in Mr Baden-Clay’s bail application relating to the forensic examination of his mobile phone, which his defence team successfully explained away.

Crown prosecutor Todd Fuller, QC, described Mr Baden-Clay’s mobile phone as his “lifeblood’’ given he was a real estate agent.

Two days before reporting his wife missing, Mr Baden-Clay Googled “taking the fifth” at 10.08pm.

Police alleged the search led to results including “self incrimination”, which he accessed through Wikipedia.

The trial heard Mr Baden-Clay watched a television program with his parents on the night of April 18, 2012, after he and his wife returned from taking a drive to the Mt Coot-tha lookout to discuss his infidelity.

The court was not told that program was The Good Wife on Channel 10.

Mr Baden-Clay claimed he searched the web for the American legal term to help explain it to his mother.

Indeed, police were able to verify that that night’s episode of The Good Wife made numerous references to the term.

Police said the forensic examination of Mr Baden-Clay’s phone showed he Googled “self incrimination” on April 20, just minutes before he dialled triple-0 to report his wife missing. He only accessed the page for three seconds.

Mr Baden-Clay said he did not search the internet for the term, but rather the web-page from his previous search “simply reloaded”. yeah we believe that

Similarly, the initial forensic examination showing Mr Baden-Clay made a FaceTime call to his father about 12.30am on April 20 was found to be incorrect.

Mr Baden-Clay’s pre-trial hearing heard police investigators realised Mr Baden-Clay’s iPhone 3GS was not capable with making FaceTime calls.

”There was a false positive in the tests,” police computer analyst Neil Robertson said.

The jury was privy to the evidence, but not the legal argument when Justice John Byrne aired his concerns about the defence case during the trial.

Once the Crown closed its case against the accused on the 10th day of the trial, Mr Baden-Clay’s defence team lodged an application for the murder charge to be dismissed.

Barrister Michael Copley, QC, made the application for “no case to answer for murder” on behalf of Mr Baden-Clay, saying evidence of a struggle between the accused and his wife did not confirm she was “fighting for her life”.

Justice Byrne said he had three concerns about drawing such conclusions, although he was careful to couch his responses in hypothetical terms.

“She was involved in a physical altercation with him. She did not survive that. Why is it not in all the circumstances open to the jury to infer that she did not survive it, because he proceeded with his intention to kill her?” he asked.

Mr Copley said: “Because … all the evidence goes to show is that there was an argument, there was arguably a fight, she responded physically towards him, and she is dead. That is all the evidence shows.” this was on the 10th day of the trial folks, I was furious not being able to share this

Justice Byrne replied: “But what if what happens is this: after she scratched him, she fell forward bumped her head and died of a cerebral haemorrhage, I mean, his conduct afterwards looks pretty odd.

“On the Crown hypothesis, he deals with her body in the most undignified fashion, going to some trouble to hide it.

“If all that has been is an altercation of not much substance that happened to go wrong … why would he not have immediately called an ambulance?”

Justice Byrne noted there was no evidence to suggest Mrs Baden-Clay had fallen and hit her head on bricks or cement. She suffered no significant head injuries and no bone fractures, according to the report of forensic pathologist Dr Nathan Milne.

“What he did involved disposing of the body in an undignified way … and he then engages in serious subterfuge,” he said. our learned Judge was on the ball

Justice Byrne said the injuries on Mr Baden-Clay’s face were more consistent with fingernail scratches, on the evidence from forensic experts. Mr Baden-Clay maintained the injuries were shaving cuts.

“He lies about the scratches and does more than that, he uses the razor blade to create the appearance some hours later of scratches on the face in that area,” he said.

“He then lies to the police about these things and maintains the deception.

“Why wouldn’t the jury say, given a moment of panic … all that happened thereafter is inexplicable.”

Justice Byrne turned his attention to the pressures in Mr Baden-Clay’s life at the time of his wife’s disappearance – his ongoing affair with his long-time mistress Toni McHugh and the financial stress relating to his real estate business.

The court had heard Ms McHugh and Mrs Baden-Clay were due to come face-to-face for the first time at a real estate conference on the same day Mr Baden-Clay reported his wife missing, April 20, 2012.

“All in all he had every reason to be under the severe strain that may have caused him in anger and resentment to engage in violence that resulted in her death,” Justice Byrne said.

“But the critical question for the present is whether the post-offence conduct … and the prolonged nature of the deception that followed could justify the inference to kill or to cause grievous bodily harm.

“Not merely, for example, a panic reaction to an unintended and an unwished-for death.

“In this context, it’s necessary to bear in mind that there was a deal of post-death conduct engaged in; lies to the police about the facial scratches, as well as the children and family members. In all probability, lies about having been asleep that night and about his wife having left the bed at some stage during the evening.

“In my opinion, given all the circumstances, its open to the jury to be satisfied that the only reasonable inference on all the evidence is that the accused not only unlawfully killed his wife, but killed her intending to cause her death.”

Justice Byrne dismissed the application, allowing the trial to continue.

Had the application been successful, Mr Baden-Clay would have only had to answer to the lesser charge of manslaughter.

Mr Baden-Clay was convicted of killing his wife at their home in the affluent western Brisbane suburb of Brookfield on April 19, 2012, and dumping her body on the banks of Kholo Creek, 14 kilometres away.

He was sentenced to life imprisonment to serve a minimum of 15 years without parole.

Gerard Baden-Clay found GUILTY OF MURDER

update 12.35 17/07/14

Gerard Baden-Clay launches appeal against murder conviction

Lawyers for Gerard Baden-Clay have filed an appeal against his murder conviction.

On Tuesday a Supreme Court jury found the 43-year-old Brisbane man guilty of killing his wife Allison in April 2012.

He was sentenced to life in prison, with a non-parole period of 15 years.

He has appealed against his conviction on four grounds, including that the verdict of murder was unreasonable, and that:

“A miscarriage of justice occurred because the jury should have been, but was not, directed that the presence of the deceased’s blood in a motor vehicle was only relevant if the jury was satisfied beyond reasonable doubt that the presence of blood was attributed to an injury sustained to the deceased’s body on the evening of 19 April 2012 or the morning of 20 April 2012,” the application reads.

“The trial judge erred in law in not directing the jury that they needed to be satisfied beyond reasonable doubt that the appellant placed the body of the deceased at Kholo Creek in order to use such a finding as post-offence conduct going to guilt.

“The trial judge erred in leaving to the jury that the appellant attempted to disguise marks on his face by making razor cuts.”


got him1

A Slide show covering the tragic events that resulted in Gerard being found guilty of Murdering his wife Allison

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

I have included the Allison’s family’s Victim Impact Statements in the GBC MENU or feel free to access each family members page and make a contribution here

Priscilla Dickie   Vanessa Fowler   Geoff Dickie


Gerard Baden-Clay, on the night of 19 April 2012, you murdered your wife, Allison.

The killing was not premeditated. But it was violent. That night, you were under considerable stress.

Your financial circumstances were, as you confessed to police, dire. Your domestic circumstances were no better.

You had resumed your affair with Toni McHugh. You kept telling her that you loved her.

You led her to understand that you intended to leave Allison and to be with her.

That afternoon, you told Ms McHugh that Allison would be at the conference Ms McHugh was to attend in Brisbane the next day.

Allison knew nothing about the resumption of the affair.

You deceived her into believing that it had ended in September 2011.

If the two women were to meet the next day, the consequences could have been dramatic, as you realised.

Your unsuspecting wife was doing her best to maintain the marriage.

A relationship counsellor had devised a plan. It allowed for Allison to express to you her feelings about the affair in a brief session every second day.

You had agreed, reluctantly, to that.

The first session happened the night before Allison died; and it had turned into an interrogation.

Allison remained tormented by the affair. She pressed you for details. On the night she died, Allison again questioned you about the affair. All the pressures proved too much for you.

The prosecution suggested that you smothered Allison; and that looks likely.

But whatever the mechanism, your violent attack caused her death.

Her fingernails scratched your face – the act of a desperate woman struggling for life.

Those marks are only consistent with your guilt.

Your shameful conduct after murdering Allison bespeaks a profound absence of remorse.

You took her body to Kholo Creek.

There you disposed of her in an undignified way: dumping her over a ledge to leave her lying in mud, exposed to the elements, insects and wildlife.

Then you put in place – and persisted in – a deception plan.

You used a razor to cut yourself near where she had scratched you, trying to disguise the injuries she had inflicted in defending herself.

You drove around the streets of Brookfield pretending to look for her. You have insinuated that mental illness may have led to drug overdose or suicide.

And besmirching Allison’s memory in that way is thoroughly reprehensible.

You have no criminal history. But you are definitely not of good character.

You are given to lies and other deception: so much so that whatever you may say on any application for parole, 15 years or more hence, will need to be assessed with considerable scepticism.

The   community,   acting   through   the   Court,   denounces   your lethal violence.

The impacts on Allison’s family have been grave.

Their victim impact statements poignantly express their pain.

You took a devoted, loving mother from her three girls, blighting their lives.

Pursuant to s.159A of the Penalties and Sentences Act 1992, I declare the

762 days spent in pre-sentence custody from 14 June 2012 until today to be imprisonment already served under the sentence.

The law provides but one penalty for your awful crime. I impose it.

You are sentenced to imprisonment for life.

Baden-Clay defence offered manslaughter

Gerard Baden-Clay’s defence team made an application for the case to proceed as a manslaughter charge due to a lack of evidence showing intent to kill. Nine News


After more than 22 hours of deliberations the jury has found Gerard Baden-Clay guilty of killing his wife Allison Baden-Clay, the mother of their 3 children.

To the relief of everybody, the jury has seen through his mountain of lies and secrecy, the double life, the excuses and false explanations. Gerard Baden-Clay was the one and only suspect from the very first day and was doggedly investigated by the dedicated QLD Police Service.

How this poor excuse for a human being has manged to fool so many for so long is astounding, but it all came crashing down this afternoon not long after the jury handed in their verdict after they deliberated for over 22h hours.


Off to prison to start his new career, Gerard Baden-Clay is heading to the place he belongs

Off to prison to start his new career, Gerard Baden-Clay is heading to the place he belongs

All previous threads and history including trial can be found clicking on link below

List of Trial Witnesses as they appear here



The statement made outside court by a family Representative

Here is Allison Baden-Clay’s family’s full statement courtesy of our friends at the Brisbane Times

“Today, we, Allison’s family and friends, are relieved that we finally have justice for Allison.  The evidence presented at this trial has proven that Gerard Baden-Clay is responsible for the murder of his wife Allison.

It has been a long wait over the last two years, and this result today marks the beginning of our long journey towards healing, and finally allowing us to mourn and grieve for this beautiful woman.

Today is not a win for our family, for it will not bring our beautiful Allison back. However, it is the closure of another chapter in this journey for our family. We have lost Allison and nothing that has happened here will bring her back.  We as a family will grieve her tragic death forever, the memories tarnished by the fact that she was taken from us in such horrific circumstances.

We would like to thank the Queensland Police Service and the CIB officers involved in the investigation, the SES volunteers who searched night and day in all weather, the scientific experts and the Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions who have all worked tirelessly to ensure that we have justice for Allison.  We would also like to thank them for their compassion and support over what has been the darkest of times.

To all of our family and friends that have sat in the court each and every day supporting our beloved Allison, we thank you and hope that you too now find some peace from this result.

Throughout this time, those in the close knit Brookfield community and those in the media and wider public have shown us empathy and compassion for which we are enormously grateful. More so, however, we have appreciated your efforts to protect the privacy of Allison’s daughters.

Our primary concern has always been and remains the emotional and physical well-being of Allison’s three beautiful daughters.  We will help them to rebuild their lives and ask for your support, cooperation and privacy in order to do this.  We have a long way to go ensure that they will cope with a future without their mother.

Allison was a kind-hearted, generous woman, a loving wife and devoted mother whose legacy will continue if we all remember that life is precious and to take the time to be kind, smile at those who pass you by and live for today.

We, her family and friends, didn’t get a chance to say goodbye but Allison will always remain forever in our hearts.

Thank you”

Gerard Baden-Clay given life sentence for murder of wife Allison

Updated 1 minute ago

Former Brisbane real estate agent Gerard Baden-Clay has been given a life sentence after being found guilty of murdering his wife Allison in April 2012.

A Supreme Court jury has convicted the 43-year-old of killing the mother-of-three at their Brookfield home and disposing of her body under the Kholo Creek Bridge, more than 13 kilometres away.

Allison’s family shouted “yes” as the verdict was read out, while security asked for a short break because Baden-Clay was struggling to breathe.

Baden-Clay, who had protested his innocence in the witness box, faces a non-parole period of 15 years.

In a victim impact statement read to the court, Allison’s mother, Priscilla Dickie, said Baden-Clay had “betrayed” her daughter.

“We have all been robbed of Allison’s love,” she said. “The discovery of our darling daughter was absolutely devastating.

“The tragedy of it all is she had so much to offer.”

Allison’s father Geoff Dickie told the court he had been left “devastated by the murder of my precious, gifted and talented daughter”.

It was a case about sex, lies and murder that gripped the city of Brisbane for two years, and the ever-growing queues outside the Supreme Court were a testament to the public’s fascination with the sordid story.

In life, Allison Baden-Clay was a dancer, teacher, successful career woman, devoted wife and mother of three girls.

In death, she became well-known for all the wrong reasons.

Her disappearance in 2012 shocked the tight-knit affluent community of Brookfield. Well-wishers and concerned residents laid flowers at her home, not knowing what else to do.

At the same time, hundreds of police and State Emergency Service (SES) volunteers swung into action, combing surrounding suburbs for any trace of the missing woman.

“Please help us, because there are three beautiful little girls of Allison’s wanting to see their mother,” her father had pleaded.

Her mother urged: “Our lives will never be the same – we must, must find her – she’s so precious.”

Premier vowed resources to find Allison

Queensland Premier Campbell Newman vowed to commit whatever resources were necessary to finding her.

“I’m just very sad for the family and friends. It’s obviously just incredibly distressing,” he said at the time.

Timeline: Baden-Clay murder

However, from the moment Baden-Clay reported his wife missing on April 20, 2012, police knew this was no ordinary missing persons case.

He had told them she went for an early morning walk and never returned home.

But marks on his face alerted police that something more sinister may have happened.

Hours turned into days, and on April 30 a lone kayaker discovered what was later confirmed as Allison’s body on the muddy banks of Kholo Creek at Anstead, about 10 kilometres from the family’s home.

That day, police refused to say whether Baden-Clay was a suspect.

On June 13, however, he was arrested and charged with his wife’s murder.

Flowers and toys decorate a memorial for Allison Baden-Clay near Kholo Creek.

Photo: Flowers and toys decorate a memorial for Allison near the Kholo Creek location where her body was found in Brisbane’s west, June 23, 2014. (AAP: Dan Peled)

Crown case against Baden-Clay circumstantial

By its own admission, the crown’s case against Baden-Clay was a circumstantial one, but the accumulation of evidence was powerful.

A post-mortem examination failed to determine a cause of death due to decomposition, and apart from a chipped tooth and possible bruising, there were no fractures to Allison’s body.

A court photo shows marks on the face of accused murderer Gerard Baden-Clay.

Photo: Marks on the face of Gerard Baden-Clay. (Supplied)

But forensic pathologist Dr Nathan Milne believed Allison did not die from natural causes.

The crown said she died at the hands of her husband, the last person to see her alive.

At the time of her disappearance, Baden-Clay had marks on his face and body that drew the attention of police.

He had excuses for them, though: he had cut himself shaving in a rush; the marks on his neck were where he had crushed a caterpillar that had landed on him while he was watching one of his daughters compete in a cross-country race; and marks on his hand were from a screwdriver that slipped while he was helping renovate a friend’s house, but marks on his chest and shoulder could not be explained by him.

However, three forensic experts testified that marks on Baden-Clay’s face were likely fingernail scratches and Baden-Clay’s claim that they were from a razor was simply implausible.

They said marks on Baden-Clay’s body could also be from scratching, although they were less conclusive.

Then there was the dripping blood found in the boot of Allison’s four-wheel drive. DNA testing confirmed it was Allison’s.

Baden-Clay’s double life

The murder trial exposed a couple living very different lives publicly and in private.

On the face of it, the Baden-Clays were a successful family, running their own prestige real estate company.

But they were in deep financial trouble and Baden-Clay was having trouble paying off loans to friends.

In desperation, he had begged the state Member for Moggill, Dr Bruce Flegg, for a loan of up to $400,000, fearing he would go bankrupt without it.

Baden-Clay was also caught between two women: his wife and lover.

Allison Baden-Clay, Gerard Baden-Clay and Toni McHugh

Photo: (L to R) Allison Baden-Clay, Gerard Baden-Clay and Toni McHugh. (Supplied/AAP)

In marriage counselling, Baden-Clay had professed to want a future with Allison, but at the same time was vowing to leave his wife on her birthday for former employee Toni McHugh.

An email trail between Ms McHugh and a secret account set up by Baden-Clay under the name Bruce Overland portrayed a tumultuous affair, and growing frustrations from Ms McHugh about her lover’s unfulfilled promises.

“Well you’ll have to forgive me that I feel disappointed when this happens. I’m sick of hiding,” Ms McHugh wrote on February 20, 2012.

“I’m sick of being second best and having to take the back seat … all so she doesn’t find out.

“Why should I believe things are going to be any different than the past[?]“

Ms McHugh wrote on March 27 she had looked at rental properties.

“It would be so much easier if you did just move in with me,” she said.

“She can get her own place and the week you have the children you move back to the house.”

I’m sick of being second best and having to take the back seat – all so she doesn’t find out.

Toni McHugh in an email to Baden-Clay


Baden-Clay wrote on April 3: “I have given you a commitment and I intend to stick to it – I will be separated by 1 July.”

He also wrote an email on April 11 – referring to Ms McHugh as GG – their names for each other were Gorgeous Girl and Gorgeous Boy.

“This is agony for me too. I love you,” he said.

“I’m sorry you hung up on me. It sounded like you were getting very angry. I love you GG. Leave things to me now. I love you. GB.”

Until April 2012, Baden-Clay had been able to keep his two worlds separate, but they were about to collide spectacularly.

On April 20, Allison and Ms McHugh were due to attend the same real estate conference.

In the witness box, Baden-Clay passed off his declarations of love to Ms McHugh as empty promises to appease a volatile, unstable and confrontational woman who was infatuated with him.

He portrayed himself as a philanderer, but no murderer: he had affairs with numerous women, but was never going to leave his wife.

Baden-Clay admitted he deceived Allison, Ms McHugh, his family and friends, and in return for his deception they gave him their loyalty.

“My intention was to end any relationship with Toni McHugh and solidify and continue my relationship with Allison for our future together,” he said in the witness box.

But the crown submitted Baden-Clay and Ms McHugh were very much entwined and his deceptive conduct showed what he was capable of.

Allison’s mental health raised at trial

The jury saw two faces of Allison. The defence painted a picture of a woman plagued by depression and unable to cope with the pressures of life.

They pursued the possibility that Allison could have taken her own life or wandered off into the night to her death.

According to testimony from Baden-Clay’s father, Nigel, and sister Olivia Baden-Walton, Allison was so incapacitated she could not get off the couch.

But her friends and family told a different story: she was a woman who was happy and feeling positive before she disappeared.

A GP, two psychologists and a psychiatrist who had treated Allison all said she was not a suicide risk.

Marriage counsellor Carmel Ritchie, who consulted with the couple just days before her death, also testified that Allison was hopeful for her future and wanting to make her marriage work.

One thing was clear, however: their marriage was in crisis. Allison’s journal revealed a woman tormented by self-doubt.

“I don’t want to be alone,” she wrote.

“I am afraid of being alone and lonely, maybe because I think I can’t handle it. I am afraid of failing – failing in my marriage and what people will think.”

Allison also had lingering questions about her husband’s affair with Ms McHugh. Some were answered, some were not.

Questions like how many times did they go to the movies together? How did they pay for hotels? Where did they have sex in her apartment? Sex in the family car?

“Did she ever say: ‘I feel bad because you’re married?’”

Three daughters left behind

The trial was the first time the public had heard the three Baden-Clay children speak about their mother’s disappearance.

Heartbreaking video recordings of police interviews with the girls, then aged 10, eight and five, taken on the afternoon their mother was reported missing showed their fear, distress and confusion at what was happening around them.

Baden-Clay wiped away tears while watching his daughters sob as they were quizzed by detectives.

Each described being put to bed by their parents. The middle girl remembered her mother singing Away In A Manger to her.

“Dad said mum had gone for a walk,” the eight-year-old said.

The youngest child said: “She was walking for a long time and we think she twisted her ankle.

“I didn’t get to see her at all because I was fast asleep.”

The eldest recalled seeing her mum on the couch watching TV when she got up to get a glass of water.

“Dad was trying to keep calm for us, but I don’t actually know what was going on in his head,” she said.

She saw “scratches” on her dad’s face, but none of the girls heard anything during the night.

The families and supporters of the Baden-Clays have sat through each day of the trial listening to evidence almost too painful to bear.

They are bound by grief, but divided by loyalty.

The guilty verdict gives them an answer – wanted or not.

But one question remains, and only Baden-Clay can really answer how he murdered his wife.

Amidst the murky personal drama are three little girls who lost their mother and will now have to learn to live without their father.

A JURY has found Gerard Baden-Clay guilty of murdering his wife Allison.

The former Brookfield real estate agent, 43, pleaded not guilty in the Supreme Court at Brisbane at the opening of his trial six weeks ago.

A jury of seven men and five women delivered its verdict shortly after 11.50am today after deliberating for 21 hours before reaching a decision.

Justice John Byrne asked the jury to retire to deliberate on Thursday at 11.10am.

Jurors lined up across one side of the court as they were asked by the judge’s associate: “Do you find the defendant Gerard Robert Baden-Clay guilty or not guilty of murder?’’

The family of Allison Baden-Clay, including her parents Geoff and Priscilla Dickie, who are seated in the packed public gallery of court 11, cheered as the jury replied: “Guilty”.

The accused was seated in the dock and stood to talk to his lawyer Peter Shields as the judge discharged the jury and thanked them for their service.

Justice Byrne told the jurors he was grateful for their service.

brisbane times

Gerard Baden-Clay appeal likely: legal expert

July 16, 2014 – 2:29PM
Gerard Baden-Clay's defence team Michael Byrne, QC, and Peter Shields (right).

Gerard Baden-Clay’s defence team Michael Byrne, QC, and Peter Shields (right). Photo: Claudia Baxter


Wife killer Gerard Baden-Clay will almost certainly appeal his conviction and sentence, a Queensland criminal law expert says.

Professor Heather Douglas from the University of Queensland says Baden-Clay’s legal team will be poring over transcripts of his 21-day trial to find grounds for an appeal.

Baden-Clay has 30 days to lodge an appeal, or apply for grounds to seek an extension of time to lodge an appeal, following his life sentence on Tuesday for the murder of his wife Allison in 2012.

“There’s a very good chance he will appeal,” Professor Douglas said.

“I haven’t been through the fine grain of the transcript, so it’s very difficult for me to suggest that there are clear-cut unambiguous grounds that are likely to lead to success, but certainly that’s what the defence lawyers will be doing now.

“They’ll be looking at every word and every direction, everything the judge said and everything that was presented in the trial.”

Under Queensland law, there are three avenues of appeal, one being error of law, as in whether the judge has made incorrect directions to the jury.

Another is if it can be shown the jury reached a “dangerous” verdict out of step with the evidence presented.

The third avenue is miscarriage of justice, which can cover a variety of scenarios including whether jurors have been found to undertake their own research outside the courtroom or if any evidence presented was prejudicial against the defendant.

Professor Douglas believes Baden-Clay’s legal team could pursue a miscarriage of justice appeal because one juror had downloaded overseas’ material on jury deliberations.

She said this might be enough grounds for an appeal application, but his lawyers would then need to prove, for the appeal to be upheld, that the juror’s action impacted on the defence’s case.

“No trial’s perfect,” she said.

“It may be possible for Baden-Clay’s defence team to identify errors in the trial or problems in the trial.

“That will get them through to the appeals stage where they can then appeal against the conviction.”

Professor Douglas said she was not familiar with the entire Baden-Clay trial but had been impressed by Justice John Byrne’s handling of the matter.

“Justice Byrne’s a very experienced trial judge … he’s been very conservative in what evidence he’s allowed into the trial,” she said.

“He has excluded some relevant evidence on the basis that it would be too prejudicial in the circumstances. I think he’s been very careful with his management of the evidence.”



Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 2,073 other followers

%d bloggers like this: