Northern Territory to launch online public sex offender register-Please follow suit


Bruce and Denise Morcombe

Photo: Bruce and Denise Morcombe attended the announcement of the NT’s public sex offender register. (ABC News: Ruby Jones)

Convicted sex offenders in the Northern Territory will soon have their name, image, physical description and whereabouts posted on a government website.

Legislation announced today has been named Daniel’s Law after Queensland teenager Daniel Morcombe, who was murdered in 2003 by a convicted sex offender on parole.

Although details have not been finalised, it was believed all of the information published about a sex offender would be publicly accessible.

The NT Criminal Lawyers Association slammed the idea, saying naming and shaming made it harder for offenders to rehabilitate without making anyone safer.

NT Attorney-General John Elferink said it would be the first website of its kind in Australia and it was expected to be launched next year.

Western Australia has an online sex register but access has several tiers of restrictions.

It is not yet clear how approximate the location information for the NT register will be. Mr Elferink said the website would include the “regional whereabouts”.

We truly hope that the introduction of Daniel’s Law will prevent another family going through the pain and grief we experienced following Daniel’s death.

Bruce and Denise Morcombe

“We’ll list them by geographical region reasonably close to where [people] live. It is not a system of exact addresses,” he said.

“They will be able to see who the sexual predators are in the community. They’ll be able to recognise the sexual predators and protect their children.

“We believe that the public’s right to know takes precedence over the privacy concerns for serious sex offenders.

“The initiative will allow individuals and families to familiarise themselves with important details and be more vigilant about named serious sex offenders living in and around the area.”

Daniel’s Law modelled on Megan’s Law in US

The NT chose to pursue its own legislation after a proposed national sex offenders register was knocked back at the recent Council of Australian Governments (COAG) meeting, according to Mr Elferink.

“From our perspective if it’s not done at a Commonwealth level then we’re going to do it in the NT and proudly so,” he said.

“Does a government make this information available or not? The answer from the NT is ‘yes, yes we do’.

“There is no guarantee a website would have protected Daniel. We know we should pull out all stops as a society and as a community to create for parents an environment to protect their children.”

He said the NT system would be modelled on Megan’s Law in the United States – the informal name for sex offender registration and community notification laws, which have been passed at US federal and state levels.

However, unlike Megan’s Law, Daniel’s Law will not list offenders’ exact address.

The Attorney-General said the Government had not yet decided on the definition of “serious sex offender”.

“We’ll create a definition which is appropriate and then have further flexible arrangements to make sure the right people are placed on our serious sex offenders website.”

He said parents were in a better position to protect their child when they were armed with detailed information.

“While the Northern Territory Police will continue to track and monitor around 200 sex offenders in the community, this tool is designed to deliver information to the community about the most serious offenders in an easy, user-friendly way,” he said.

‘You’d hate to be the last state to have a register’

Daniel’s parents Bruce and Denise Morcombe, who have been calling for the introduction of a national child sex offender register, said they hoped the NT register would spread across the country.

“Of course sometimes one can imagine the paedophiles and the predators on the NT sex offenders register may well not want to be in the NT any longer,” Mr Morcombe said.

“They may migrate to other states and territories.

“You’d hate to be the last state to have a sex offenders register up and running. You’re going to get truckloads of people you don’t want in your state.”

The couple, who were in Darwin for the announcement, said they commended the NT’s decision.

“The NT has taken a leadership step,” Mr Morcombe said. “They were the first to do so.

“This is for ordinary Australians. It is to get the good people at arms length from the predators.

“We want protection for our kids.

“Daniel’s Law we are confident will assist in the mission to make sure kids of Australia are safe.

“We think it is breathtakingly simple but at the end of the day will make a massive difference for children right around the country.

“I am sure the feedback from that will migrate to other states and they’ll say, ‘Why not us?'”

Daniel disappeared when he was 13 while waiting for a bus at Woombye on Queensland’s Sunshine Coast in 2003.

His remains were found in bushland eight years later.

His convicted killer, Brett Peter Cowan, had a long history of sexually abusing children.

He had been arrested and sentenced in 1989 for two years in jail after molesting a boy in a public toilets.

Four years later, while living in a caravan park in Darwin, Cowan attacked a six-year-old boy. He later pleaded guilty to gross indecency, grievous bodily harm and deprivation of liberty.

He was sentenced to seven years’ jail and released on parole four years later.

‘Terrible idea will turn people into vigilantes’

Public online sex registers make it harder for offenders to rehabilitate, increase the chance they will re-offend, and do not make anyone safer, according to NT Criminal Lawyers Association president Russell Goldflam.

He said the NT Government’s proposal was “terrible”.

From our perspective if it’s not done at a Commonwealth level then we’re going to do it in the NT and proudly so. Does a government make this information available or not? The answer from the NT is ‘yes, yes we do’.

John Elferink, NT Attorney-General

“Laws like this have been tried in the US, mainly over the last couple of decades,” he said. “They don’t result in anyone being safer or the level of recidivism being decreased.

“There are some real costs. They are expensive to run but more importantly is they can get in the way of people being rehabilitated.

“This can result in people going underground instead of engaging with those who can assist them to stop reoffending

“In a place like the the NT we expect anyone who is going to be put on the register will leave the NT and go somewhere else. That doesn’t help anybody. It just makes it harder to keep track of them.”

He said the system would further stigmatise, prejudice and stereotype convicted sex offenders.

“A very significant range of laws operate to protect the community from people who may be at risk of reoffending,” he said. “There is already a register, already a provision for for identifying offenders, already laws to detain serious repeat sex offenders.

“Where these laws have been passed in the US – and they have in some places included exact places where people live – vigilantes have murdered people on the list or people they believe are on the list, even if they weren’t child sex offenders.

“The Attorney-General says this will make people be more vigilant.

“Our concern is this will make more people into vigilantes.”

About these ads

Who wants to be a unpaid crime blog reporter/contributer?


Not real journo’s who still have a job, maybe cadets (but not good for resume…mmm)

Maybe old school scribes who wish they could stay in the game!

How about folks like me with no relevant qualifications but gives a toss about the crimes in their communities?

The pay-off is a verdict like today GBC cowardly wife killer.

People like me? You relate to how I write?

Hey cant spell well, 2 finger typer…So am I YES…Our stuff gets checked before we post.

Sounds like you?

GOOD keep reading

This site has had massive coverage lately (I cover non famous crimes too)

I’m thinking along the lines of a Co-ordinator in each state

That co-ordinator runs that states crimes and has authors who get the stories up.

What do you think?

Sound good, bad, troublesome, confusing?

All I want is to give the best coverage of what is going on in our communities.

The community expectations has/have?  outgrown my skills honestly…

Each state, minimum deserves better coverage. The good people email me why haven’t you covered this rape, or that kidnapping, or the death of a cousin in my indigenous community.

You could help us!

Football match-fixing: How to rig an international football match


Following an investigation by The Telegraph and Channel 4’s Dispatches into football match-fixing, we show how our undercover fixers proposed to appoint corruptible match officials in order to rig international games

Peter Greste trial: Al Jazeera journalist found guilty-gets 7 yrs


Most disgusting and crazy verdict ever regarding journalists covering news anywhere EVER in this day and age.

7 bloody years jail for covering the political crisis in Egypt. Take note…Not supporting anyone, just covering like a good professional journo should. I have followed this since his arrest and have been very reluctant to get into international crimes as a whole. But this is an award-winning professional newsman from Australia. 

Greste’s father Juris , his mother Lois and brother Andrew must be devastated.

I have watched every single presser they have done live, showing solidarity, admiration, support, pride, and respect for Egypt yet asking for fairness.

This is all in the absence of proper evidential procedures, lack of legal representation, false video evidence unrelated to the charges the list goes on.

His elderly parents have maintained dignity and respect for the legal process and now surely they have earned the right to DEMAND action rather than request diplomatic action…Outrageous.Australia MUST make INVOKE all sanctions available against Egypt

Peter Greste trial: Al Jazeera journalist found guilty

Updated 4 minutes ago

Australian journalist Peter Greste and his Al Jazeera colleagues have been found guilty by an Egypt court of spreading false news and supporting the blacklisted Muslim Brotherhood.

Greste and Mohamed Fahmy were sentenced to seven years in jail by a judge and Baher Mohamed was sentenced to 10 years. Three other journalists who were tried in absentia were handed 10-year sentences.

Middle East correspondent Hayden Cooper was in court for the verdict and said there was a look of despair on his brother Andrew Greste’s face.

Greste, along with his colleagues Fahmy and Mohamed, had been in detention since their arrest in late December.

Prosecutors were demanding the maximum penalty of between 15 and 20 years in jail for Greste and his co-accused.

Greste and his colleagues are among a group of 20 journalists charged by the Egyptian government in a case that has triggered international outrage about press freedom in Egypt.

Of that group, 16 are Egyptians accused with joining the Brotherhood, which was designated a terrorist organisation in the wake of the army ousting elected president Mohamed Morsi last July.

Prime Minister Tony Abbott appealed to Egypt’s new president, Abdel Fattah al-Sisi, to release Greste earlier today, saying the journalist was reporting on the Muslim Brotherhood not assisting them.

Peter Greste profile: Career of a foreign correspondent

Updated 3 minutes ago

An Egyptian court has sentenced Australian journalist Peter Greste to seven years in jail for collaborating with the banned Muslim brotherhood.

His two Al Jazeera colleagues, Mohamed Fahmy and Baher Mohamed, were sentenced to seven and 10 years respectively.

Greste and his colleagues were arrested in December last year on suspicion of illegally broadcasting news and harming “domestic security”.

The arrest, trial and judgment is the most recent chapter in the foreign correspondent’s career spanning more than 25 years.

Born in 1965, Greste spent his early years in Sydney before moving to Queensland at the age of 12 with parents Juris and Lois, and younger brothers Andrew and Mike.

His parents say a Rotary exchange trip to South Africa after high school triggered Greste’s interest in cultures, languages and travel.

He returned to Brisbane to study and graduated with a Bachelor of Journalism from the Queensland University of Technology in 1986.

In an interview with ABC’s Correspondents Report in 2005, Greste spoke of his admiration for Australian cameraman Neil Davis, who died in a coup in Thailand in 1985.

“Davis’s biography [was] the book that inspired me to leave home and become a foreign correspondent in the first place,” Greste said.

“He was, without doubt, one of the bravest and yet most cautious of men in this business awash with far too many cowboys and fools.”

From Brisbane to the Balkans

Greste launched his journalism career in regional Victoria before gaining further experience in Adelaide and Darwin.

He left Australia in 1991 to pursue his dream of becoming a foreign correspondent, working as a freelancer for Reuters TV, CNN, WTN and the BBC.

 

On assignment for the BBC in 1995, Greste worked as the Kabul correspondent covering the emergence of the Taliban.

After the September 11 attacks in 2001, he returned to Afghanistan to cover the war before continuing his work across the Middle East, Central Asia and Latin America.

In 2004, Greste relocated to Mombasa in Kenya, where he worked as a freelance journalist and photographer.

During his time in Kenya, Greste reported on the unlikely friendship between an orphaned baby hippo and a 130-year-old giant tortoise, which led to a children’s book.

In a 2011 interview with Ryan Kohls, Greste described his passion for photography.

“I write because I need to write for work. I enjoy it, obviously, or I wouldn’t do it,” he said.

“I get a lot more satisfaction out of the creativity of taking pictures.”

No stranger to tragedy

On assignment for BBC in 2005, Greste witnessed the death of his producer Kate Peyton, who was shot in the back while they were both standing outside a hotel in the Somali capital, Mogadishu.

Greste reflected on Peyton’s death in an interview with the ABC’s Correspondents Report:

I was with her when she was shot.

We were working together on the story, just the two of us, and we both knew what we were getting into.

It was a risk we both judged to be worth taking, if only because so few reporters have been into Somalia in the past decade, and nobody can hope to make a considered judgment of either Africa or Islamic extremism without understanding why that country has remained so anarchic.

So when I’m asked, “Who cares what happens in a dusty poverty-stricken, anarchic backwater on a corner of Africa?” the answer is as simple as it is obvious: Kate Peyton cared.

He returned to Somalia in 2011 to film a BBC documentary about life in the war-ravaged nation, which won a prestigious Peabody Award.

For the past nine years he has worked as a correspondent for Al Jazeera in Africa, covering the Horn of Africa, Kenya, Tanzania and the Great Lake states.

‘Journalists are never supposed to become the story’

Greste left his home in Nairobi in December for a three-week stint in the Egyptian capital.

“This assignment to Cairo had been relatively routine – an opportunity to get to know Egyptian politics a little better,” he wrote from his prison cell in a piece published on his Al Jazeera blog.

Peter Greste

  • Born in Sydney in 1965
  • Graduated from Queensland University of Technology in 1986
  • Worked internationally for BBC, Reuters, CNN, WTN, Al Jazeera
  • Covered emergence of the Taliban and post-9/11 war in Afghanistan
  • Won 2011 Peabody Award for documentary Somalia: Land of Anarchy
  • Correspondent for Al Jazeera in Africa since 2005 covering Horn of Africa, Kenya, Tanzania and the Great Lake states

“But with only three weeks on the ground, [there was] hardly time to do anything other than tread water.”

Admitting he has produced work in the past that “involved lots of detailed investigation, considerable risk, and not a small amount of sweat”, Greste says this assignment was not one of those occasions.

Greste describes the Egyptian story as a “routine body of reporting on the political drama unfolding around us”, but he and two colleagues, Mohamed Fahmy and Baher Mohamed, found themselves at the centre of the international news landscape after their arrests on December 29.

“Journalists are never supposed to become the story,” he said.

“I had been in Cairo only two weeks before interior ministry agents burst through the door of my hotel room.

“I was at first genuinely confused and later even a little annoyed that it wasn’t for some more significant slight.”

Press freedom under question

Greste says he initially sought to fight his imprisonment “quietly from within”, but decided that was a “dangerous decision”.

“It validates an attack, not just on me and my two colleagues, but on freedom of speech across Egypt,” he wrote.

Greste’s search for “accuracy, fairness and balance” in his Egyptian reporting led him to the banned Muslim Brotherhood.

“How do you accurately and fairly report on Egypt’s ongoing political struggle without talking to everyone involved?” he wrote.

“We had been doing exactly as any responsible, professional journalist would – recording and trying to make sense of the unfolding events with all the accuracy, fairness and balance that our imperfect trade demands.”

The plight of the journalist and his colleagues has been met with support from international press.

In an open letter published by The Guardian, Greste has been described by BBC director of news and current affairs James Harding as a journalist of integrity.

The letter, co-signed by executives from international news organisations, calls for the journalist’s release.

“We know Peter Greste to be a fine, upstanding correspondent who has proved his impartiality over many years,” the letter said.

Peter Greste trial: Family strong in face of ‘psychological torture’

Posted 15 minutes ago

The seven-year sentence given to Peter Greste in Egypt marks yet another chapter in the “torturous” ordeal facing the Australian journalist’s family.

The despair on the face of Andrew Greste told the story, as the judge convicted his brother of collaborating with the banned Muslim Brotherhood.

Peter Greste’s two Al Jazeera colleagues, Mohamed Fahmy and Baher Mohamed, were also convicted and sentenced to seven and 10 years in jail respectively.

The Greste family will now be forced to come to grips with the situation confronting them after months of uncertainty surrounding the foreign correspondent’s fate.

Greste’s mother Lois once described him as a “strong character”, but the resilience of the entire family has been on display since his arrest in late December.

Since Greste’s jailing in Egypt, his Queensland-based parents, Juris and Lois, have spoken often about their son’s plight and drawn on the strength of their supporters.

Greste and his Al Jazeera English colleagues were accused of spreading false news and aiding the Muslim Brotherhood. All three denied the charges.

Despite the difficult circumstances facing them, Juris and Lois have volunteered their voices to their son’s campaign.

“You find strength and skills that you never knew you had, and dare I say we’re drawing on each other and capabilities that we’ve never had to call upon,” Juris Greste previously told 7.30.

Lois Greste has also credited the Australian public with helping to get the family through the ordeal.

“It has been tremendous, otherwise truly we wouldn’t have been able to keep ourselves together and maintain the very intense campaign that this has turned into,” she said.

Greste’s brothers, Mike and Andrew, have both spent stints in Cairo offering support to their brother during the trial process.

Earlier this month, Mike Greste told AM the family was trying to keep its feelings in check.

“You just don’t have any expectations, it’s safer that way,” he said.

“I guess in some ways … it’s a shock to fear or think that they’re asking for the maximum [sentence] and that’s what Peter might receive.”

Trial process ‘a form of psychological torture’

But the long, drawn-out process has taken its toll on the family.

In April, a day after Greste was denied bail for the second time, Juris Greste spoke about the pain his son’s ongoing detention was causing the family.

“I don’t want to start debates about torture, what is torture, but really, this process is a form of psychological torture to the extended family,” he said.

“I don’t want to blow it out of all proportion, but it makes it look so painfully, so excruciatingly unnecessary.”

I am really amazed at how dignified they (the family) have been.

John Sneddon, Queensland lawyer

 

In March, Andrew Greste expressed his frustration at how long the process was taking, saying it was “tough” to leave his brother and return to Australia.

“There was a certain amount of regret and sadness that I left Cairo on my own because obviously I was hoping to be able to walk out of there together,” he said.

But the family’s poise in the face of adversity has been a constant throughout the ordeal.

Queensland lawyer John Sneddon, who represented Australian businessman Marcus Lee after he was charged with fraud in Dubai, praised the way Greste’s family handled the situation.

“I think everything the family is doing is correct,” he told ABC 612 Brisbane.

“I take my hat off to them. I think they are handling the matter very well.

“I am really amazed at how dignified they have been.”

A timeline of escalation: Al Jazeera in Egypt

Updated 1 hour 56 minutes ago

Since the military coup of July 2013, Al Jazeera says its staff have been subjected to systematic attacks, intimidation, arrests and confiscation of property.

June 28, 2013

Cameraman Mohammad Farhat is hospitalised for two weeks after being beaten by pro-regime “Baltagiya” gangs.

July 3, 2013

Egyptian authorities raid offices of Al Jazeera’s “Mubasher Misr” Arabic language channel and 28 employees are arrested.

All staff are released after six hours, with the exception of executive Ayman Gaballah, who is held for four days and released on bail.

Police also raid separate offices of Al Jazeera Arabic and a crew is detained in the bureau for six hours, while broadcast engineer Ahmad Hassan is imprisoned for four days.

Egypt Bureau chief Abdel Fattah Fayed is detained, and according to Al Jazeera, charged with “running an unlicensed satellite channel and transmitting news that could compromise Egypt’s national security”.

Fayad is released on bail.

July 12, 2013

Five Al Jazeera crew members are detained in Suez while reporting protests. They are detained by the military for “a few hours” before being released.

July 15, 2013

Cameraman Mohammad Badr is arrested.

August 14, 2013

 

Cameraman Mohammad El-Zaki is shot and wounded by snipers while covering protests at Cairo’s Rabaa Al-Adaweya Square.

Correspondent Abdullah Al-Shamy is arrested and detained.

Crew members Emadeldin Elsayed and Almuwahed Bellah are detained, beaten and have their equipment seized after covering a security forces crackdown on a pro-Morsi camp. They are later released.

August 27, 2013

Correspondent for the Al Jazeera English channel, Wayne Hay, cameraman Adil Bradlow, producers Russ Finn and Baher Mohamed are detained in Cairo.

Baher is released after two days. The others are deported to Britain after five days in custody.

 

August 2013

Al Jazeera English cameraman Mahdi Fattaouh and his driver are detained for a few hours and have their equipment confiscated while covering demonstrations.

August 29, 2013

Executive producer Shihab El-Ddin Shaarawi is detained for two days.

September 1, 2013

Account manager Mostafa Hawwa is detained in Cairo for a day.

December 29, 2013

Al Jazeera English correspondent Peter Greste, producers Mohamed Fahmy and Baher Mohamed, and cameraman Mohamed Fawzy are arrested.

The arrests occur during a National Security Service raid on their makeshift bureau in a Cairo hotel and their equipment is confiscated.

Foreign Affairs Minister Julie Bishop says the Australian Government is doing all it can to help Greste.

“Officials in Cairo have been contacted and they are providing direct consular assistance to him,” she said.

 

December 31, 2013

Cameraman Mohamed Fawzy is released but Greste, Fahmy and Mohamed remain in detention.

The detainees are accused of having links to a “terrorist organisation”, portraying Egypt in state of civil war, “airing false news” and working without a permit.

January 21, 2014

Al Jazeera Arabic correspondent Abdullah Al-Shamy, who has been in detention since August, begins a hunger strike.

February 4, 2014

Cameraman Mohammad Badr is acquitted of all charges and released.

April, 2014

Abdullah Al-Shamy is joined on a hunger strike by his wife.

May, 2014

Al Jazeera files Notice of Dispute against Egypt for breaching a 1999 investment treaty with Qatar, seeking $US150 million in compensation for the mistreatment of Al Jazeera journalists.

June, 2014

In a surprise development, Egypt’s public prosecutor orders the release of Abdullah Al-Shamy, who has been on hunger strike for more than 130 days in protest over his detention.

“I have won. Everyone who is a freedom fighter or a journalist doing his work credibly and honestly has won,” Al Jazeera quotes him as saying.

“I missed my freedom, I missed my life. My life stopped on August 14 at 6pm when I was moved to a place I did not wish to be.

“It is important to mention that this is only the beginning. I am more determined to carry on this struggle than before.”

Al-Shamy’s release comes 307 days after his arrest.

Multiple authorities, including the Malaysian Military let Malaysia Airlines flight 370 disappear-Really?


  This has dragged on, so very sad for the victims families, reading  stories left right and center.  I guess I can do my best by showing the current media view here in Australia, after the world zoned in on our country and the west coast, in Indian ocean. Not to say we or anyone has a lot to still answer for…VERY SAD STORY HERE. I will continue to update this no matter what the outcome or damage to any country

May 19, 2014
Pilot Described as Competent, Modest Professional 2:51

http://cdn.newsapi.com.au/image/v1/external?url=http://m.wsj.net/video/20140328/032714asiatodaypilot1/032714asiatodaypilot1_1280x720.jpg&width=650&api_key=kq7wnrk4eun47vz9c5xuj3mc

Who is the captain behind the missing Malaysia Airlines plane? The WSJ’s Mark Magnier reveals a portrait of Zaharie Ahmad Shah, the man who piloted Flight 370.

A NUMBER of authorities, including the Malaysian military, reportedly let MH370 disappear, according to shocking new claims about the missing plane.

ABC’s Four Corner’s program quoted Malaysian Defence Minister Hishammuddin Hussein as saying that Malaysia’s civil aviation authorities called the military asking them to keep an eye on the plane but that the military allowed the plane to glide out to sea.

The plane was deemed not to be hostile and therefore the military did not send a plane up to investigate.

“If (we didn’t) shoot it down, why send it (jet up),” Mr Hussein said.

Malaysia’s airspace as MH370 flew almost directly over the station located on the island of Penang but that it appeared nothing was done.

Anwar Ibrahim said the military had completely breached the standing operating procedures.

“The air force will be alerted and will have to then be flown to that area to either … guide the plane to land or to leave the Malaysian airspace. They’re standard operating procedure and this was never done,” he said.

“Yeah I mean it’s a major scandal here because … this is of course amounting to a major threat to national security.”

Happy family ... A screen capture from a You Tube tribute for Malaysian Airlines pilot Ca

Happy family … A screen capture from a You Tube tribute for Malaysian Airlines pilot Captain Zaharie Ahmad Shah, posted by his family. 

MORE: Doubts raised over ‘ping’ validity

The program also addressed rumours that Captain Zaharie Ahmad Shah’s wife had left him.

His brother-in-law, Asuad Khan, said claims that his sister Faizah had left Zaharie, taking their children with her to another house, in the hours prior to the ill-fated flight’s take off were “completely false.”

Mr Khan also denied that his 53-year-old brother-in-law was experiencing personal problems, had been upset about politics or that he was unfit to fly on March 8.

He said the veteran pilot’s marriage was not in trouble over a rumoured affair, saying that as a Muslim he was permitted to have multiple girlfriends outside his marriage.

Close family ... Ahmad Seth Zaharie, 26, with his sister Aishah Zaharie, 27, left,and mot

Close family … Ahmad Seth Zaharie, 26, with his sister Aishah Zaharie, 27, left, and mother Faizah Khanum Mustafa Khan

RELATED: Pilot’s family lash out at reporters

“Even I don’t believe it because she, she’s at home. Well the normal procedure for their … whenever the husband fly the wife will go to another house where the younger son’s staying. Otherwise she will be alone in that big house. That’s been practised since they bought the house.”

It was claimed Captain Zaharie had received a two-minute phone call shortly before takeoff from a mystery woman, using a mobile phone number obtained under a false name.

Family tribute for Captain Zaharie Shah 0:58

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Family of missing Malaysian Airlines Captain Zaharie Shah from flight MH370 pay tribute to him.

Mr Khan defended his brother-in-law’s right to have a girlfriend.

“That I do not know about. Even if I know I said why not? We are allowed to, as long as you take good care of your wife. Even if you ask my sister and she said she don’t care,” he said.

“He can marry another one. Why not — we can marry four. We are Muslim.”

Technical experts in the US were also working to recover deleted information from a sophisticated flight simulator Zaharie had set up on a home computer.

But Mr Khan said the simulator had not been used this year.

“I don’t think so because the simulator is not working,” he said.

“That simulator was dismantled already, the things crash. It don’t work so he got to ah reformat the drive.”

Family ties ... Captain Zaharie Ahmad Shah and daughter Aishah Zaharie. Source: Facebook.

Family ties … Captain Zaharie Ahmad Shah and daughter Aishah Zaharie

RELATED: Captain Zaharie’s daughter ‘was in Australia’

Mr Khan also said Zaharie had not attended the trial of Malaysian opposition leader Anwar Ibrahim that day, which some reports suggested proved he had been radicalised and had hijacked the plane in an act of terror.

“No. I ask my sister personally, even my sister herself informed him on what happened on that day,” he said.

The program also claimed that someone inside the cockpit began interfering with the in-flight entertainment system around the time MH370’s transponder was turned off or failed.

It also revealed that a team of up to five officers could or should have been on duty at the nearby radar operations centre at Butterworth air base looking for unidentified aircraft.

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