Such Is Life-Ben Cousins


My Say

Are the Victorian Police serious? They would have to start arresting people by their thousands, not to mention all the TV crowd.Maybe they should roll up to the Logies and do drug testing and sniffer dogs, on Australia’s night of nights? Ben Cousins is showing a lot of courage in doing what he is doing.The doco is giving us a rare insight into the elite athlete/celebrity lifestyle. So many have something to answer for over Ben.The West coast Eagles for starters, his club, how the hell they never knew, even protected him from drug testers. His father, who seems really loving and concerned for his son.If he wanted to, he could of gone to the media to save his son years ago, but didn’t.Exposing him obviously was not as important as his football career…

Ben Cousins at training for the Tigers 2010

UPDATE 9.35am: VICTORIA Police has vowed to investigate any illegal drug taking screened in Ben Cousins’ tell-all documentary but hasn’t seen anything to warrant a probe yet.

The first part of controversial documentary Such Is Life aired on Channel 7 last night.

The opening instalment topped last night’s television ratings, drawing a whopping 1.99m viewers, making it the most-watched program nationwide.

A police spokesman said that “any evidence” of illegal drug use screened in the documentary would be investigated.

But it was believed no drug taking screened in last night’s episode was committed in Victoria.

“At the moment, there is nothing in the Channel 7 coverage to indicate he has committed any offences in Victoria,’’ the spokesman said.

“If material comes to light through tonight’s program or it is revealed that Cousin’s drug use was in Victoria, we will investigate and act accordingly.”

More than 780,000 Melbourne viewers tuned in, the most from any capital city.

The documentary has already drawn plenty of comment and criticism, with footy icon Ron Barassi saying West Coast has “a lot to answer for” over its treatment of Ben Cousins.

Six-time premiership player Barassi said he had taped the documentary and hoped to watch it in the coming days.

When asked if he thought West Coast failed its duty of care to Cousins, Barassi said: “From what one hears, I think West Coast (has) a lot to answer for’’.

Ben Cousins and Chris Judd 2006 Grand Final

“Surely they must have known he was on drugs.

“It was not just one player from what I understand.’’

Youth worker Les Twentyman was not impressed by the documentary, saying it showed a far more glamorous life than the harsh reality of drug use.

“That was like watching Bambi compared to watching documentaries we made 10 years ago,” Twentyman said.

He said it portrayed “Hollywood style drug use, that’s not the reality to what we deal with, it destroys lives, Ben’s life hasn’t been destroyed”.

Twentyman also said the Eagles have a lot to answer for and he has “grave concerns” for Ben after he retires from footy this weekend.

Retiring Richmond veteran Cousins is in a race against time to play his last game against Port Adelaide on Sunday.

He left the field late in the third quarter against St Kilda with soreness high on his left leg and could not go back on.

Cousins said he expects to undergo a fitness test later in the week to determine if he can play.

Barassi said how Cousins motivated himself after football would depend on how much pride the Brownlow medallist had in himself.

“He has a chance to turn things around if he wants to keep going on this path to recovery,’’ he said.

Child psychologist Michael Carr-Gregg said the structures in Ben’s life will be important to stop him relapsing.

He says it’s a matter of managing the illness and not trying to cure it.

“He is suffering a disease that is resistant to treatment and subject to relapse,” Carr-Gregg said

Carr-Gregg says Ben’s ability to stay off drugs after retiring from football will be just as hard as when he first came off drugs.

“It think it will be enormous, I think it will be his greatest challenge ever,” says Carr-Gregg.

“I do believe when you see the whole thing it will be a useful tool for young people … I don’t think it normalised, sanitised or glamourised drug use at all.”

He says people should wait to see the whole documentary before making a judgement on it.

AFL spokesman Patrick Keane said the league would not comment on the documentary until it had been shown in full.

Dead Man Running by Ross Coulthart Duncan McNab


Dead Man Running

A first hand account of perhaps the most powerful and influential crime group currently operating in Australia and North America. It is the first time ever that an insider has told the true and chilling story of the bike gangs that dominate the drug and illegal weapons trade.

Description

They’ll come after me. I really am a dead man running.

The Australian Federal police have identified motorcycle gangs as the greatest organised crime threat in Australia – more potentially harmful to the community than any terrorist cell. This book tells the bloody story of the criminal involvement of the feared Bandidos gang – and how one man broke their code and turned informant.

‘We are the people our parents warned us about’ is the motto of the Bandidos, one of the world’s most feared outlaw motorcycle gangs. For 10 years, Steve Utah was a Bandidos insider, a trusted confidante of senior bike gang members along the east coast of Australia. He arranged the security of their clubhouses and electronic surveillance and counter surveillance. He ‘cooked’ ecstasy and ice for them. He witnessed meetings in which interstate and overseas drug and weapons smuggling was planned.

Utah loved the wildness of the Bandido life and their contempt for the law, but as he was gradually goaded into increasingly serious crimes as a test of his loyalty to the gang, his life started to spiral out of control. He witnessed vicious beatings, helped dump corpses, knew about the theft of rocket launchers and machine guns. He saw men executed in front of him.

It all became too much and, in an attempt to regain control of his life, Utah resorted to the unthinkable: he rolled over to the federal Police and told them all he knew about the Bandidos. He had intimate knowledge of every facet of their business in Australia and many aspects of their activities in North America. So trusted had he become that he could point Police to those complicit in three murders. He literally knew where the bodies were buried.

This shocking, unflinching, tragic story is Steve Utah’s confession. He knows he is a dead man running – that inevitably the Bandido code will be honoured and he will be silenced. But not before Utah gets his chance to wake Australians to the looming threat in their midst – the relentless rise of sophisticated organised crime networks inside outlaw motorcycle gangs and the apparent inability of the Police and legal system to deal with it.

About Ross Coulthart Duncan McNab

Ross Coulthart is a Walkley Award winning journalist. Duncan McNab is the author of The Usual Suspect – The Life of Abe Saffron (Pan Macmillan 2005) and The Dodger – Inside the World of Roger Rogerson (Pan Macmillan 2006). He is also a former policeman and private investigator.

Above The Law: How Outlaw Motorcycle Gangs Established The World's Biggest Criminal Empire


Above the Law

Following the astonishing revelations in the best selling ‘Dead Man Running‘, comes this forensic examination of the global future of organised crime – now being operated on a massive scale by outlaw motorcycle gangs. One of the astonishing revelations in the bestselling expose ‘Dead Man Running’, by Ross Coulthard and Duncan McNab, was the difficulty faced by the Australian police in tackling the burgeoning crime empire that outlaw motorcycle gangs were developing in our country. The news just gets worse – here in Australia and wherever else these biker gangs flourish. ‘Above the Law’ takes a hard and chilling look at the global future of organised crime, and reveals that the world’s most successful criminal empire is now being operated on a massive scale by outlaw motorcycle gangs – an empire that is growing in power, reach and ruthlessness by the day. Far surpassing the threats posed by the Mafia, Russian syndicates, Chinese Triads and Japanese Yakuza, outlaw motorcycle gangs are now being acknowledged as the greatest current organised crime threat. Their international empire is both sophisticated and bloody and brutal. It is also both strategic and opportunistic – where they cannot dominate, they broker alliances.

‘Above the Law’ investigates how it all started: the turf wars that were fought, the deals that were done, and how the sea of cash that was earned is now being legitimised. It also reveals how law enforcement at an international level is losing the battle against the gangs. Using exclusive insider sources on four continents, this is the first contemporary account of one of the biggest criminal stories of our time. Read it and be afraid.

About Ross Coulthart and Duncan McNab

Duncan McNab is a successful writer and former police officer and private investigator. Ross Coulthart is a Gold Walkley award-winning journalist who is the chief reporter on Channel 7’s flagship Sunday night current affairs program.

Mcnab and Coulthart

Above The Law: How Outlaw Motorcycle Gangs Established The World’s Biggest Criminal Empire


Above the Law

Following the astonishing revelations in the best selling ‘Dead Man Running‘, comes this forensic examination of the global future of organised crime – now being operated on a massive scale by outlaw motorcycle gangs. One of the astonishing revelations in the bestselling expose ‘Dead Man Running’, by Ross Coulthard and Duncan McNab, was the difficulty faced by the Australian police in tackling the burgeoning crime empire that outlaw motorcycle gangs were developing in our country. The news just gets worse – here in Australia and wherever else these biker gangs flourish. ‘Above the Law’ takes a hard and chilling look at the global future of organised crime, and reveals that the world’s most successful criminal empire is now being operated on a massive scale by outlaw motorcycle gangs – an empire that is growing in power, reach and ruthlessness by the day. Far surpassing the threats posed by the Mafia, Russian syndicates, Chinese Triads and Japanese Yakuza, outlaw motorcycle gangs are now being acknowledged as the greatest current organised crime threat. Their international empire is both sophisticated and bloody and brutal. It is also both strategic and opportunistic – where they cannot dominate, they broker alliances.

‘Above the Law’ investigates how it all started: the turf wars that were fought, the deals that were done, and how the sea of cash that was earned is now being legitimised. It also reveals how law enforcement at an international level is losing the battle against the gangs. Using exclusive insider sources on four continents, this is the first contemporary account of one of the biggest criminal stories of our time. Read it and be afraid.

About Ross Coulthart and Duncan McNab

Duncan McNab is a successful writer and former police officer and private investigator. Ross Coulthart is a Gold Walkley award-winning journalist who is the chief reporter on Channel 7’s flagship Sunday night current affairs program.

Mcnab and Coulthart

WRITTEN ON THE SKIN


WRITTEN ON THE SKIN

A crime scene investigator notes the tiny indentations on the fragments of a tin can identified at a bomb site. After months of testing he is able to match them to the can opener that made them – and lead police to the bomb-maker who used it.

A forensic dentist documents the marks in chewing gum dropped by a thief during a burglary and matches them to the teeth of the suspect. A forensic physician examines an abused child, “reading” the terrible alphabet that fists and weapons write on the skin and identifying a mother’s hairbrush as the source of the “tramline bruising” on her daughter’s leg.

Liz Porter’s riveting casebook shows how forensic investigators – including pathologists, chemists, entomologists, DNA specialists and document examiners – have used their specialist knowledge to identify victims, catch perpetrators, exonerate innocent suspects and solve dozens of crimes and mysteries.

Author Information

Liz Porter is a journalist who began her career in Hong Kong and then worked in Sydney, London and Stuttgart before returning to her home town of Melbourne, where she is a feature writer for the Sunday Age. She has won awards for her writing on legal issues and has published a novel. She lives with her partner, her daughter and the obligatory female-writer quota of two cats and is a hopelessly devoted fan of the St Kilda Football Club.

Reviewed by: Dr Robert N Moles

For those who like “real life” CSI – this is a terrific book. It brings together a wide range of forensic cases grouped according to whether they deal with “blood” “bones” “organs” “skin” “teeth” “fire” “insects” or “documents”.

If anything this book is a testament to human ingenuity. First of all is the ingenuity of the author in tackling such a wide range of scientific and technical issues, and being able to explain them in an interesting and instructive manner in the context of the cases she is dealing with.

Then, of course, there is the rather perverse ingenuity of the people who are the subject of these cases. It is quite shocking to realise just what human beings are capable of doing to each other; bashed, stabbed, shot, burned, poisoned, defrauded. This book has it all. Then having despatched one another, there is the ingenuity involved in attempting the cover-up, or the explanation as to why or how another has gone missing. Its all terribly sad.

Then comes the ingenuity of the investigators. I must say, that having studied myself so many examples of miscarriages of justice, I found it quite refreshing to read about investigators who are dedicated to their respective tasks. The number of examples which Porter had studied where police and forensic investigators had gone way beyond their duty in pursuing inquiries or piecing together tiny fragments of information or of bones or teeth in order to arrive at a conclusion one way or another was both remarkable, and sufficient to restore one’s faith in human nature.

another review

THERE are no holds barred in this behind-the-scenes look at the forensics of police detective work. It shows how a strong stomach is as much a necessity as a determination to see justice done. Liz Porter has picked cases from a roster that includes child molestation and rape, murder and deliberate disfigurement. She shows how scientific studies of abrasions, blood stains, bone damage, DNA and cooling and decomposition rates have developed since the 1970s and how such technologies have been used – and sometimes abused – in criminal prosecutions. A bedtime book only if your intellectual curiosity can override your dismay and discomfort.

Rough Justice : Unanswered Questions from the Australian Courts By: Robin Bowles


Rough Justice : Unanswered Questions from the Australian Courts

Rough Justice: Unanswered Questions from the Australian Courts examines the question at the heart of our criminal justice system – what happens when our courts get it wrong?

Why is former Victorian police sergeant Denis Tanner a free man if the Victorian state coroner named him as the killer of his sister-in-law Jennifer Tanner?

Did Greg Domaszewicz really kill Jaidyn Leskie and get away with it because he had a good lawyer?

What was the real cause of the sudden death of young nursing sister Birgit Munro when 24 hours before she died she’d been ‘as fit as a flea’?

Why did West Australian alleged hit-run killer John Button confess to killing his fiancee Rosemary Anderson if he didn’t do it?

Why won’t Bradley John Murdoch tell the police where he hid Peter Falconio‘s body?

Why did a juror in Graham Stafford’s trial call Stafford’s mother – after reading a book containing the full story of the murder Stafford had allegedly committed – to apologise for finding her son guilty?

Was Roseanne Catt, who served a ten-year jail term in New South Wales for the attempted murder of her husband Barry, ‘an evil and manipulative woman or the victim of a terrible conspiracy’ between her husband and the police?

Did Henry Keogh cold-bloodedly drown his fiancee in her bath, or has he served nearly half his life sentence as an innocent man, condemmed by an incompetent forensic report?

This latest book by Australia’s true crime queen, Robin Bowles, makes no claim to promote the guilt or innocence of any of the people discussed. Rather, it examines the due process of the law and how, at times, that process may not seem to deliver justice.

"Never To Be Released" 4 By Paul B Kidd


Never To Be Released 4

Never To Be Released 4

To be sent to jail with papers marked ‘never to be released’ is the ultimate punishment in the Australian judicial system. There is no death penalty. ‘Never to be released’ is reserved for the worst of the worst.

And, except for two cases – which are included in this book – these days ‘never-to-be-released’ means exactly that. The only way out is in a black rubber bag with a zipper up the middle, having died either by misfortune, suicide or old age.
In this, his fourth book in the series, Paul B. Kidd, Australia’s serial killer and ‘never to be released’ authority, includes more cases that are the most evil of the evil, where the perpetrators have been sent to prison without the possibility of parole – ‘never to be released’.

Paul B. Kidd Paul B. Kidd is a broadcaster on 2UE, Sydney, where he co-hosts one of the most popular segments on Australian radio, ‘Crime File’, with George Moore.

Paul is the author of ten books on Australian true crime and is a recognised authority on Australia’s serial killers, major criminal cases and never to be released lifers.

Click on the cover images below for more information or to purchase Paul B. Kidd titles.

Celluloid Serial KillersThe Australian Crime FileThe Australian Crime File 2Till Death Do Us Part

“Never To Be Released” 4 By Paul B Kidd


Never To Be Released 4

Never To Be Released 4

To be sent to jail with papers marked ‘never to be released’ is the ultimate punishment in the Australian judicial system. There is no death penalty. ‘Never to be released’ is reserved for the worst of the worst.

And, except for two cases – which are included in this book – these days ‘never-to-be-released’ means exactly that. The only way out is in a black rubber bag with a zipper up the middle, having died either by misfortune, suicide or old age.
In this, his fourth book in the series, Paul B. Kidd, Australia’s serial killer and ‘never to be released’ authority, includes more cases that are the most evil of the evil, where the perpetrators have been sent to prison without the possibility of parole – ‘never to be released’.

Paul B. Kidd Paul B. Kidd is a broadcaster on 2UE, Sydney, where he co-hosts one of the most popular segments on Australian radio, ‘Crime File’, with George Moore.

Paul is the author of ten books on Australian true crime and is a recognised authority on Australia’s serial killers, major criminal cases and never to be released lifers.

Click on the cover images below for more information or to purchase Paul B. Kidd titles.

Celluloid Serial KillersThe Australian Crime FileThe Australian Crime File 2Till Death Do Us Part