Who wants to be a unpaid crime blog reporter/contributer?


Not real journo’s who still have a job, maybe cadets (but not good for resume…mmm)

Maybe old school scribes who wish they could stay in the game!

How about folks like me with no relevant qualifications but gives a toss about the crimes in their communities?

The pay-off is a verdict like today GBC cowardly wife killer.

People like me? You relate to how I write?

Hey cant spell well, 2 finger typer…So am I YES…Our stuff gets checked before we post.

Sounds like you?

GOOD keep reading

This site has had massive coverage lately (I cover non famous crimes too)

I’m thinking along the lines of a Co-ordinator in each state

That co-ordinator runs that states crimes and has authors who get the stories up.

What do you think?

Sound good, bad, troublesome, confusing?

All I want is to give the best coverage of what is going on in our communities.

The community expectations has/have?  outgrown my skills honestly…

Each state, minimum deserves better coverage. The good people email me why haven’t you covered this rape, or that kidnapping, or the death of a cousin in my indigenous community.

You could help us!

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GBC Trial Day 19.5 (the weekend)

Featured


Something to get the chat going for the weekend

Baden-Clay murder trial: Large crowds in court evidence of a healthy legal system, top barrister says

11/07/14

Gerard Baden-Clay

The murder trial of Gerard Baden-Clay has seen a ticketing system introduced to prevent overcrowding

The high level of public interest in the Gerard Baden-Clay trial is nothing out of the ordinary, and in fact makes for a healthy legal system, a top barrister says.

The former real estate agent’s murder trial attracted crowds to the Brisbane Supreme Court, with extra courtrooms opened for people who queued day after day to gain entry, and a ticketing system introduced to prevent overcrowding.

The Department of Justice and Attorney-General says these special arrangements for large-scale trials are made to ensure openness and transparency in the justice system.

This transparency is key to keeping Australia’s legal apparatus – everyone from police to barristers and judges – held to account, says Ken Fleming, QC.

Mr Fleming was the defence barrister for former Bundaberg surgeon Jayant Patel and has worked as a United Nations prosecutor on international war crimes trials.

“Everyone should be held accountable for what they’re doing, and the open scrutiny of it is a very important thing,” he said.

“You just can’t have things going on behind closed doors, because that engenders fear of the unknown.”

Mr Fleming says the “whole delivery of justice” depends on high levels of public interest, because people can see and understand the process.

Seeing mystery unravel part of appeal, barrister says

The courts are not, however, in danger of turning into another form of entertainment – rather, they always have been.

“You only have to think about the French Revolution and the guillotining in the forecourt of the Notre Dame,” Mr Fleming said.

Although some people may attend just to see a mystery unravel, he believes many also have a genuine interest in watching the ins and outs of the legal process.

There might be some prurient interest as well, but I think that’s not the major reason people are there.

Ken Fleming, QC

“You only have to look at some of the British television programs to see how we love a good murder mystery,” he said.

“There might be some prurient interest as well, but I think that’s not the major reason people are there.

“They just have a genuine interest in what’s going on.”

Glen Cranny, a defence lawyer and partner at Gilshenan and Luton Lawyers, also believes a high level of public interest is healthy for the criminal justice system generally.

“People might come for any number of reasons, and some might come for mawkish reasons,” he said.

“Nevertheless, I think the benefits of having an open and transparent system … far outweigh any perverse interest some people may get out of such proceedings.”

Public pressure witnesses face may discourage some: lawyer

Publicity and public interest in a case can also encourage other complainants or witnesses to come forward and give evidence, where they may have otherwise been unaware or not confident enough.

Rolf Harris‘s case in England, for example, involved people who were coming forward as complainants once they, I think, had the courage that there were protections and systems in place for their story to be told,” Mr Cranny said.

But this benefit has a flip-side: that very publicity could make people apprehensive about revealing their story.

“I think there is a tipping point where some people might think they could do without their face or name being splashed on TV as a witness, or as a complainant,” Mr Cranny said.

“They would be happy to be involved in the process in a low-key way, but don’t want to be engaged … in anything that might in some way feel like a circus to them.”

Reputational issues should also be factored in, especially when a person’s conduct, while lawful, may not hold them in a good light.

“We’ve seen in a recent high-profile case … a lot of focus on extra-marital affairs and so on,” Mr Cranny said.

“There are people who are involved in those relationships, who haven’t broken the law, but have become very prominent just through their personal lives.”

Mr Fleming says that while public interest could make some people “a bit reluctant”, he had not seen any evidence of public attendance impacting on witnesses.

“It is on display and in a sense it’s theatre,” he said.

“But once people are resigned to the fact that they will be giving evidence, I don’t think too much stands in their way.”

Opening additional courtrooms and keeping the public away from “where the action is happening” also means witnesses are only faced with a very small and confined audience in the main court, Mr Fleming said.

All previous threads and history including trial can be found clicking on link below http://aussiecriminals.com.au/category/gerard-baden-clay/

List of Trial Witnesses as they appear here

ANY EVIDENCE LIKE PHOTOS, VIDEO OR DOCUMENTS THE COURT RELEASES TO THE PUBLIC WILL BE PUBLISHED in the GBC Documents Page

Brisbane Supreme Court Justice John Byrne has asked a jury to retire to consider a verdict in the trial of Gerard Baden-Clay.

Football match-fixing: How to rig an international football match


Following an investigation by The Telegraph and Channel 4’s Dispatches into football match-fixing, we show how our undercover fixers proposed to appoint corruptible match officials in order to rig international games

Ryan Tandy: Disgraced NRL footballer’s gambling led to his career, life unravelling and eventual suicide


Ryan Tandy: Disgraced NRL footballer’s gambling led to his career, life unravelling and eventual suicide

Updated Fri 9 May 2014

My previous posts on this sad saga over the years can be found here

http://aussiecriminals.com.au/2010/08/30/canterbury-forward-ryan-tandy-punting-scandal/

http://aussiecriminals.com.au/2010/09/22/ryan-tandy-betting-scam-deepens-ex-star-on-cctv-putting-on-big-wad-of-cash/

http://aussiecriminals.com.au/2011/03/03/match-fixing-scandal-tandy-charged-sam-ayoub-and-john-elias-arrested/

http://aussiecriminals.com.au/2010/12/02/nrl-betting-video-is-half-back-brad-murray/

http://aussiecriminals.com.au/2011/03/04/police-releasing-more-cctv-footage-on-betting-scandal/

http://aussiecriminals.com.au/2011/10/06/ex-bulldogs-star-ryan-tandy-found-guilty-of-nrl-match-fixing/

Related Story: Tandy’s problems caught up with him: Turner
Related Story: Ryan Tandy dies of drug overdose
Related Story: Former NRL player Ryan Tandy granted bail over ‘standover’ accusations
Earlier this week, friends and family farewelled former rugby league player, Ryan Tandy, at a funeral on the New South Wales central coast
Former NRL player Ryan Tandy was found dead last month of an apparent drug overdose

Former NRL player Ryan Tandy was found dead last month of an apparent drug overdose

Mourners there remembered him as a talented athlete, a loving son and a valued friend.

Among them was sports psychologist Rob Brown.

“The real Ryan is somebody who will be, by those who knew him, cherished and will be missed for the rest of their lives,” he said.

But there was another, darker side to Tandy.

There have long been blurry connections between sporting stars and elements of the underworld, and the story of Tandy’s demise stands as a cautionary tale of just how easy it is to slide into that grey area.

“A lot of athletes are trained to push through their limits and not to think of the cost because the rewards are so great,” Mr Brown points out.

“So when they are no longer athletes, when they don’t have those supports there, when there is no coach or mentor, when it comes down to themselves and their own decision making, sometimes that’s flawed and sometimes that leads them into trouble.”

Tandy’s rugby league career peaked when he played with Melbourne Storm in their premiership winning side of 2009. On the surface his future appeared bright.

But unknown to most, Tandy had a long-standing gambling habit which would be the catalyst for a life that spiralled out of control.

It developed not long after his father died, when Tandy was 14.

“It’s been a pattern for his whole life, even going back as far as the early 2000s when he played for the (St George) Dragons,” says Tandy’s friend and sports journalist at Sydney’s Daily Telegraph, Josh Massoud.

“He had to go to the extent of the CEO to look after his rent, look after his groceries, and then pay him what was left, just to make sure that he had those needs met.”

Mounting gambling debts leads to threats

By 2010 the problem had become even more serious.

He bet on his first match with his new club, the Canterbury Bulldogs, despite NRL rules banning players from gambling on the sport, and had racked up gambling debts of tens of thousands of dollars.

“Even former flatmates had no idea about this side of his life. It obviously did get to a point at that stage in his life where he was, I think the court heard, that he was about $70,000 in the hole at the Bulldogs,” Massoud says.

Tandy was placing bets on racing and NRL games with jockey manager and former journalist, John Schell.

Mr Schell’s betting ledger shows Tandy’s rollercoaster punting spree over a week in June 2010, the same month he joined the Bulldogs.

It reveals a string of losses which left him owing Mr Schell more than $30,000. When Tandy refused to pay Mr Schell started to chase Tandy’s manager Sam Ayoub.

According to evidence Mr Schell later gave at Tandy’s trial, he texted Mr Ayoub, warning he would reveal Tandy’s gambling activities to Bulldogs management if Tandy did not pay up.

By Mr Schell’s court account, the tensions over Tandy’s gambling debt came to a head one night in July 2010.

Mr Schell had gone to the Moorebank Hotel to watch a Danny Green title fight, where he was approached by a man known to him and Tandy, who delivered this warning: “You’d want to drop off chasing Tandy for that money. He is tied up with people that you don’t want to know. You don’t want these types of blokes turning up at your front door.”

Frightened, Mr Schell texted Tandy to say the debt was forgiven. Tandy replied: “Sounds good because I didn’t want things to get ugly.”

A few weeks later Mr Schell decided to alert the Bulldogs, according to Mr Schell’s evidence.

He arranged to meet Bulldogs football manager Alan Thompson and the club’s then CEO Todd Greenberg (now the NRL’s deputy chief executive) at a cafe in Homebush, where he says he showed them Tandy’s betting ledger and the series of losing bets that had been placed on races and rugby league matches.

Despite the evidence, nothing was officially done and Mr Schell says the pair simply told him to take up the issue with Mr Ayoub.

Mr Greenberg and Mr Thompson declined an interview. Through a spokesman, Mr Greenberg denied being told about Tandy’s NRL betting plunge.

Betting plunge leads to investigation, conviction

Four days after the meeting at the cafe, the Bulldogs played the North Queensland Cowboys in Townsville – the game that would bring Tandy’s league career to dramatic end.

Off the field, bets had poured in on a so-called exotic bet, that the Cowboys would score first with a penalty goal.

In the opening minutes, Tandy set the scene for punters to take home more than $100,000. He deliberately held down a player in a tackle and gave away a penalty to the Cowboys directly in front of the goal.

But the plan went awry. Instead of taking a quick kick, the Cowboys played the ball and scored a try.

A week later, the NRL announced an investigation into the penalty and the betting plunge, and in February 2011, NSW police charged Tandy, Mr Ayoub, notorious former footballer, John Elias, and a number of others over the alleged fix.

Hassan Saleh, a friend and former teammate of Tandy’s at St George, was one of those who bet on the match. He says Tandy was confident he would be cleared.

“He honestly thought that it was going to go away, he would keep playing footy. And then six months later, police, we were living together at the time, police rocked up at our house, took mobile phones, took everything and then he sort of got the point,” Mr Saleh said.

In October 2011, Tandy was convicted of dishonestly attempting to obtain a financial advantage for Ayoub, Elias and others.

The case against Mr Ayoub hinged on the evidence of another former player, Brad Murray, who was captured on video betting on the game.

Murray gave evidence in the Tandy case that Mr Ayoub had told him the fix was on but later changed his account and said he had lied in his original statement.

Tandy was the only person convicted and the NRL also banned him for life. Charges against Mr Ayoub and the others were dropped and Mr Ayoub was awarded costs.

“He was pretty much outcast from the game for life before he was even found guilty in front of a court,” Massoud said.

“And I think when that happens, and when somebody doesn’t have any hope left, their options are shut off and they can spiral out of control.”

Tandy implicated in drug-related kidnapping

In January this year Tandy’s life hit an all-time low when he was accused of a drug-related kidnapping.

According to a police brief of evidence, it happened near midnight at the Mingara recreation club on the NSW central coast.

A man involved in a dispute over drugs and money was walking to his car when he was bailed up by three men. One of them was Tandy.

They took the man and drove him around all night, demanding he hand over the drugs and cash.

Police later claimed Tandy’s role was that of standover man. There were also rumours an outlaw motorcycle gang was involved.

They were going to smash my legs. I’ve heard them talking about other bashings and I know who they’ve got backing them

Victim’s police statement

 

The next morning, police allege, Tandy drove the kidnapped man to a Commonwealth bank in Gosford, where he withdrew $4,500 and handed it over to Tandy, who waited outside.

The victim later told police he thought about running, but feared the men.

“They were going to smash my legs. I’ve heard them talking about other bashings and I know who they’ve got backing them,” the victim’s police statement says.

Tandy was arrested later that day.

“I found out, like everyone else did, when it hit the headlines and I was surprised,” Massoud said.

Late last month, before he had faced court on charges of kidnapping, Tandy was found dead from an apparent drug overdose, believed to be prescription medication.

Betting Scandal at Australian Open tennis


Margaret Court Arena

Betting Scandal at Australian Open tennis…More to come 15/01/2014

Betting Scandal at Australian Open tennis, just confirming facts.Involves placing bets, caught red handing on video…Someone is always watching dickhead…stay tuned more more

this is direct from the official Australian Open 2014 website.

Illegal gambling and match fixing

Tennis Australia has a zero tolerance policy on illegal gambling, match-fixing and the communication of sensitive information that may affect the outcome of a match, and will investigate all reported instances

Update 3pm 15/01/14

Man charged with Australian Open betting offences

Police are about to hold a media conference in Melbourne over alleged court side betting at the Australian Open.

A 22 year old man from the United Kingdom has been arrested and charged with one count of engaging in conduct that would corrupt a betting outcome.

He has been bailed and is due to face a Melbourne Court tomorrow.

Detectives from Victoria Police’s Sporting Integrity Intelligence Unit and Melbourne Crime Investigation Unit will continue to monitor the event and are warning would-be punters to think twice about their conduct. This has me thinking could be hanger on or some wag in the crowd yelling out to a player ” Blah Blah to double fault every serve this game…

Deputy Commissioner Graham Ashton said people needed to be aware that this sort of activity was illegal in Victoria.

“Victoria now has specific legislation that covers offences related to cheating at gambling,” DC Ashton said.

“Offences include engaging in conduct that corrupts a betting outcome, facilitating conduct that could corrupt a betting outcome and use of corrupt conduct information for betting purposes.

“These offences carry hefty penalties of up to 10 years in prison.

“We will be monitoring matches for the remainder of the tournament, so if you’re thinking of engaging in this kind of behaviour, think again.”