Contributors Wanted-Long hours, no pay…Passion for the truth a must


Contributors Wanted-Long hours, no pay…Well I’m kidding about long hours that will be up to you, but yes NO PAY! It’s a tough world this blogging business, and I’m falling behind because I cannot keep up on everything happening nor keep up with cases and events WORTHY of coverage and exposure here! I also encourage people to also have an opinion as an author when they put their name to a story. The debates on here are one of the best things we have

So here is what I am asking for folks and then you can decide if it is something you are interested in doing for our little community here and the wider “Net” for people to discover without fear or favour.

  • Contributors from each State, to allow better coverage on cases in their state as they happen
  • Researchers that can help look beyond the headlines (the sleuths that use more than google to find stuff!) Maybe suitable for anyone who likes to dig around, but not be the face of the article
  • Moderators now I pretty much allow anyone to have their say in the comments, but we do get people who trawl and make extreme comments purely for their own entertainment and stir up trouble. Over use of certain explicit language. So someone to help keep these types in line or off-line all together by deleting irrelevant vulgar comments etc

These are all ideas and please, I do this for you all, assuming you are the same as me and hate seeing the criminals, and scum-bags that float around our cities and streets getting away with stuff unscathed, hidden behind friends in high places or ancient suppression orders handed out like ice creams…

So please, suggestions here are encouraged, make a comment below…because without you guys, this site is nothing… Thanks

The details in the following form are kept private and will never be made public here on the Blog. It is for my eyes only guys…Regards Robbo

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Ricky Nixon-Sex, lies and Video Tape


Ricky Nixon is still living in fantasy land, refusing to be a man and admit his failings, dodging questions, walking away, deflecting blame. Has he forgotten how old he is compared to how old she is. The master negotiator of million dollar contracts, mixing it up in the big tough business work and this teen “Tricked him” into everything did she? Well if that is the case Tricky Dicky Nixon, you are more the fool and she is a genius.

More likely is you were thinking with your dick and have tried ever since to get out of taking any responsibility you loser…

UPDATE 02/05/11

UPDATE 10.40am: DISGRACED AFL player agent Ricky Nixon has inferred he was unwittingly drugged before being filmed in Kim Duthie’s hotel room wearing only his underpants.

In an allegation aired on radio MTR’s Steve Price Breakfast Show, Nixon this morning said he had no idea how he ended up in the teenager’s room near nude.

And the suspended player agent, who declared he would no longer speak about the scandal, confirmed he came close to taking his life while standing on a bridge in London.

Nixon told MTR he didn’t want to spark another police investigation or “witchhunt” but suggested drugs were the reason why he couldn’t explain being in Duthie’s hotel room wearing only underpants. correct, the drugs he snorted

“The answer is still I don’t know,” Nixon told MTR.

But what people don’t know is I was found a few hours after that outside my office at Etihad Stadium some three kilometres from the hotel room in not a great way. drugs do catch up with you “Tricky”

“Let’s just say that there is a good reason why I don’t know what happened.”

He has denied having sex with or taking drugs with the teenager.

Asked by Price whether he thought he unknowingly had a drink spiked or drugs introduced into his system in some other way Nixon said: “All I’ll say is that I’ve always thought you’re a smart bloke, that you’re very good at analysing things and nine times out of 10 you are right in what you say Steve.”

RICKY Nixon has failed to explain why he was in schoolgirl Kim Duthie’s hotel room wearing only a pair of underpants.

The disgraced sports agent instead accused Duthie of “setting him up” and “conning the world” they had sexual relations and that he gave her drugs.

Nixon said Duthie was a member of “Gen-Y who is very tech savvy and who is very good at making up conversations and texts”.

“We are talking about a habitual liar, a habitual liar who strips down to her G-string on Lonsdale street,” he said.

An angry and emotional Nixon struggled to answer many questions put to him tonight by Channel Seven‘s Ross Coulthard. Several times Nixon walked out of the interview or reminded the journalist of legal ramifications.

Asked bluntly of the central allegations, Nixon said – “Let me be very clear, I had no sexual relationship with that girl, I never have at all.”

But Nixon failed to explain why he was in his underpants in a hotel room with Duthie.

“No I can’t (explain it),” he said.

“And no one can provide any evidence to me of sex or drugs. You’ve all been conned.”

Nixon admitted texting Duthie at one stage to tell her he would look at pictures of her in his phone “when I am on top of you” but said the comment was being taken out of context.

He also denied telling her he would share a line of cocaine with her and after one heated exchange with Coulthard said – “I was not using cocaine with this girl.”

Nixon also spoke for the first time about allegations he threatened to kill the girl and her family and of taking his own life while in London because of the pressure.

Denying he threatened to kill Duthie over the allegations and the video footage, Nixon said he told her he may as well driver his car into the Yarra.

Nixon described Duthie as a “habitual liar” when confronted with the claim he had sent Duthie a text saying – “Why did you film? You will have a nice life because it will be a short one. I’m not going to kill you, just your mother, father and little sister. Then you will know what its like to have your life ruined.”

The accusation prompted Nixon to confess you had wanted to kill himself.

“I was in London in total shock in the lowest ebb of my life, wondering what the hell had happened,” he said.

“Have you ever stood on a bridge across the Thames and nearly tried to jump off it? Have you ever done that? Have you ever thought your life was over, Ross?

“Have you ever thought you’re sick and tired of a 17-year-old girl playing with your life, and your family’s life, and your kids life, and your grandmothers life? Would you enjoy that?”

Nixon was banned last month from practising for two months by the AFL Player Association after an investigation he described as “media driven and unlawful.”

“The only person they didn’t speak to was myself,” he said.

“I was under a medical condition in recovery. I wasn’t allowed to speak to the board or given adequate time to do it. It was a witch-hunt, it was media driven and I’m not sure they lawfully had the right to investigate me anyway.”

The fiery television exchange left more questions than answers.

“People forget that the two people standing at the top of the pyramids are her and I. Underneath it are parents, friends, boyfriends, girlfriends, clients, business staff they’re all affected by this. They’re all affected by it and they’re very tired of it.”

Jockey BOBBY EL-ISSA DISQUALIFIED FOR TWO YEARS


Ever since horse racing was invented there have been those that have tried to cheat to win money at the races, but when it is as blatant as a jockey basically pulling up a horse and waiting for another to pass him in the straight it cannot be ignored. These days with betfair making anyone basically a bookie, plenty can be made winning or losing, depending on the way you go. Bobby El-lssa is by all accounts a likeable bloke, a damn good jockey with plenty of winners. I have backed him on many occasions, but who can you trust these days, it appears he has been in collusion with friend and big punter Stephen Fletcher to make money by making sure his horse loses…Two years is not enough if they are going to get fair dinkum about this sort of practice. They need to put them out for life…Bring a huge message to these high-profile jockeys, who are very well paid as it is, that cheating is and WILL NOT be tolerated…

See the race here

Racing Queensland stewards found 34-year-old El-Issa guilty of not allowing Bold Glance to run on its merits and giving it every chance to win the $100,000 Falvelon Stakes (1200m) on February 26.

El-Issa was also found guilty of improper riding while stewards also laid a charge against prominent professional punter Stephen Fletcher of being a party to the jockey’s breach of the rules.

Fletcher was granted an adjournment after stewards found he was a party to El-Issa not allowing Bold Glance to run on its merits.

The stewards said their investigations had determined that Fletcher wagered heavily on the winner Essington and had also laid Bold Glance to lose.

They alleged he won $30,000 in bets on Essington and also retained a stake of $55,000 when Bold Glance was beaten due to El-Issa’s ride.

The charge stated that Fletcher was:- (a) aware of jockey El-Isssa’s intention that he not run Bold Glance on its merits; (b) that he made El-Issa aware of his intention to back Essington and lay Bold Glance; and (c) at all material times Fletcher and El-Issa were close associates.

Fletcher was granted an adjournment after being charged to enable him to submit further betting records.
El-Issa was found guilty of not allowing Bold Glance to run on its merits, failing to ride his mount to obtain the best possible finishing position and improper riding.

The charges stated that El-Issa rode in a manner to deprive Bold Glance of its real and legitimate opportunity of winning the race in that after passing the 200m when challenged by Essington he deliberately and consciously rode with insufficient vigour which resulted in Bold Glance not being fully tested and not finishing the race off at its best.

The stewards found that passing the 200m until near the 100m when Bold Glance was holding an advantage over Essington El-Issa deliberately and consciously stopped using the whip and otherwise failed to ride his mount with sufficient vigour.

Leaving the 100m he again, after using the whip in a backhand manner on only two occasions, deliberately and consciously stopped using the whip and over the concluding stages his deliberate and conscious lack of vigour resulted in Bold Glance not being fully tested and thereby did not finish the race off at its best.

Entering court for pretending to be his brother in 2009 to beat traffic charges

The improper riding charge stated that El-Issa deliberately and consciously failed to exercise sufficient vigour inside the final 200m when challenged for the leading position and did so to ensure the success of wagers placed by an associate (Fletcher) who had backed the winner Essington to win and had laid Bold Glance.

In drawing this inference the stewards carefully considered the bet history of Fletcher through the betting exchange Betfair that illustrated a concerning level of confidence when he laid horses ridden by El-Issa.

They found that Fletcher’s bet history revealed that his 10 heaviest risks (lays) on horses in Queensland races were ridden by El-Issa and that he had an abnormally high success rate of more than 90 percent when laying horses ridden by the jockey.

El-Issa was told that the stewards panel was unanimous in their rejection of his explanations for the manner in which he rode Bold Glance over the final 200 metres and that his actions were deliberate and consciously designed to prevent Bold Glance from running on its merits.

They cited his lack of obvious vigour, his body position in the saddle that was inconsistent with his regular position when attempting to derive the best effort from his mounts, the lack of movement through his legs and through his torso which is identifiable in his riding when embroiled in a tight finish, his abbreviated hand movement and the fact that he did not use the whip in a forehand manner at any stage and only used it backhand on three occasions.

This was viewed with attention to the fact that there is no specific prohibition on backhand use of the whip and no prohibition on the use of the whip inside the final 100 metres.

The stewards also took into account that Bold Glance jumped from barrier 1, enjoyed an easy passage on the fence behind the leaders and was afforded clear running at the top of the straight.

The manner in which the race was run and the way the race presented itself favoured the chances of Bold Glance and on this basis the stewards were satisfied that capacity to respond if fully tested.

Trainer Norm Hilton and part-owners Mr W & Mrs T Walsh and Mrs T Hilton also gave evidence at the inquiry. No charges have been laid against any of these parties.

Following his second placing at Eagle Farm, Bold Glance won the $100,000 Gold Coast Stakes on March 19 when ridden by Scott Seamer.

Seamer will again be aboard Bold Glance in Saturday’s Group One George Ryder Stakes at Rosehill.

El-Issa won the $150,000 Weetwood Handicap at Toowoomba on the favourite Lucky Leak on Thursday.

Jockey Bobby El-Issa pretended to be brother

September 17, 2009

A BRISBANE jockey has narrowly escaped being immediately jailed for trying to pass himself off as his brother to police and a magistrate in a bid to avoid a drink-driving offence.

The Brisbane District Court was told Gold-Coast-based Ibrahim “Bobby” El-Issa had been disqualified from driving when police arrested him with a blood alcohol content of 0.059 along Logan Rd, Mt Gravatt, on Brisbane’s southside, on August 30 last year.

Prosecutor Shenna Singh said El-Issa, who had no identification on him at the time, told the arresting officer his name was Ameer El-Issa — who is actually his brother who lives interstate.

She said El-Issa continued his ruse when he fronted the Holland Park Magistrate’s Court and again when he surrendered to police when a warrant was issued for his arrest for failing to appear for his second court appearance.

The court was told it was not the first time El-Issa held himself out as one of his siblings in an attempt to avoid a traffic offence.

Ms Singh said El-Issa claimed to be another brother — Jawad El-Issa — when he was pulled over for a minor traffic offence on October 29, 2007.

El-Issa came unstuck on that occasion because the police officer recognised him and rebuffed by saying: “Aren’t you Bobby El-Issa?”

The court was told El-Issa may have continued to avoid justice had police not taken his fingerprints when he turned himself in after the warrant for his brother, Ameer, was issued.

El-Issa, 33, pleaded guilty to one count each of perverting the course of justice, drunk driving and obstructing and contravening a police direction.

Judge Wally Tutt sentenced El-Issa to a 15-month, wholly suspended, jail term and fined him $2500.

Barrister Steve Kissick, for El-Issa, said he was a successful professional jockey who faced losing the only job he had been trained to do as the result of his offending.

“I think it can be said quite safely that his job is gone,” Mr Kissick said.

“(El-Issa) has to go before (Queensland Racing’s) integrity board to make it known (he has been convicted of these charges).

Judge Tutt said: “Obviously, no doubt his position (as a jockey) will be reviewed by the Queensland Racing Board. I am aware of the process.”

However, he said there have been other cases where jockeys have been convicted of serious criminal offences and later had their jockey’s licenses re-instated.

Judge Tutt, in sentencing El-Issa, said the jockey’s actions had placed his brother in a legally vulnerable position had his criminal behaviour not been detected.

“The innocent person here … was your brother,” he said.

“The reason this is so serious … is because it cuts at the very core of our justice system.”

Outside court, El-Issa said this matter had been “haunting” him for the past eight months and he was now looking forward to the birth of his first child later this year.

Police releasing more CCTV footage on betting Scandal


POLICE will today release new CCTV photographs of punters placing bets as they escalate their investigation into the NRL betting scandal.

Detectives yesterday laid three new charges against Canterbury Bulldogs forward Ryan Tandy and also charged player agent Sam Ayoub and former star John Elias over an alleged attempted betting sting on the Cowboys-Bulldogs NRL game on August 21 last year.

They face up to 10 years in prison if found guilty. Tandy has entered not guilty pleas to the charges and all three men will vigorously fight the allegations.

“These are serious allegations which go to the heart of the game, and ultimately erode public confidence,” investigation head Detective Superintendent Arthur Katsogiannis said.

This morning, police launched a public appeal to help identify four people depicted in CCTV footage who attended Sydney betting facilities in Beaconsfield, Ashfield and in the Queensland city of Townsville.

Police are not suggesting the people in the footage have engaged in unlawful activity but believe they may be able to assist detectives.

In the footage, one man is seen placing a bet at a facility on Botany Road at Beaconsfield between 11am and 11.20am on August 20.

He was described as being of Middle Eastern/Mediterranean appearance, of slim build, with short black hair, aged in his late twenties and wearing a dark suit, light shirt and black shoes.

In another length of footage, a second man is seen placing a bet at a facility on Liverpool Road in Ashfield between 5.20pm and  5.36pm on August 20.

He was described as being of white/European appearance, of medium/solid build, with grey hair, aged in his late forties to early fifties and wearing a dark long sleeved shirt, black shorts and glasses.

A third piece of footage shows two men placing a bet at a hotel on Sturt Street in Townsville between 4.16pm and 4.22pm on the same day.

The first man is described as being of white/European appearance, of muscular build, with a beard/goatee, aged in his 20s and wearing a yellow polo-style shirt, black baseball cap with a motif on the front.

The second man was described as being of white/European appearance, of slim build, with short brown hair, aged in his twenties and wearing a black t-shirt with a large motif on the front.

“We’ll be calling for public assistance to identify more people,” Superintendent Katsogiannis said.

On a day that shook the rugby league world just a week out from the 2011 premiership kick-off, the probe into the betting scandal widened, with another match – Ryan Tandy’s Bulldogs debut against the Titans on June 18 last year – also under scrutiny.

Bulldogs star Tandy appeared in court yesterday to fight allegations of lying to the State Crime Commission about his involvement in betting on two NRL matches last year.

Three new charges were served on the 29-year-old star at Downing Centre Local Court yesterday, with one of the fresh allegations relating to the earlier game between the Gold Coast Titans and the Bulldogs in June 2010.

The two other charges relate to giving false evidence.

Tandy’s solicitor Danny Eid entered pleas of not guilty to all four of the charges on his client’s behalf. Tandy was granted police bail just hours after his arrest.

Elias’s brother George, a lawyer, told The Daily Telegraph: “John’s got no involvement in these allegations.

“He’d actually like to thank the two detectives and police at Bankstown for the courtesy they showed his mother and family in the investigation.”

NRL boss David Gallop warned that anyone found to be involved in match-fixing would be out of the game for life.

“This [the arrests] is a seriously alarming development,” Gallop said of yesterday’s arrests.

“Anyone who’s suspected of being involved in fixing a game or an element of a game is going to find themselves charged by the police and their place in the game I would say will disappear.

“Life bans have got to be on the cards for that kind of thing. Anyone involved in [match-fixing] needs to know that the penalties are going to be severe if they’re proven to be true.”

Related Coverage

Match Fixing Scandal – Tandy Charged, Sam Ayoub and John Elias arrested


FORMER first grade footballer John Elias and player agent Sam Ayoub were today arrested as the NRL betting scandal deepened.

They are finally rounding up these cheating greeding players. Bad enough to try and cheat in a high profile sport, and then be caught out and still lie, come on boys, man up and admit you stuffed up, you all look ridiculous.Tandy has to be banned for LIFE from any sport forever, and the other cronies involved should get time in jail…But there is MORE TO COME

No support: the Bulldogs will not provide Ryan Tandy with any support for his legal bills

The arrests came as police laid a further three charges against Bulldogs player Ryan Tandy when he appeared in court today.

Elias, 48, of Punchbowl was arrested at 9.45am by police attached to a special taskforce set up to investigate the alleged betting scam.

Sam Ayoub, 49, Tandy’s manager,  was also arrested when he presented himself at Campise police station. Ayoub’s business offices in Leichhardt were also raided. Both men are expected to be charged later today and appear in court. The arrests are part of an ongoing investigation into an alleged illegal betting activity surrounding the Round 24 NRL match between the Bulldogs and the Cowboys last year.

Tandy, 23, faced court today charged giving false and misleading information to a law enforcement agency. He denied lying to the NSW Crime Commission regarding his involvement in an alleged betting scandal. He was arrested last month following a probe by the racing and casino investigation unit.

The 29-year pleaded not guilty in Sydney’s Downing Centre to four counts of providing misleading evidence to the Crime Commission. Police today laid an additional three charges against Tandy in relation to three separate incidents relating to giving false/misleading evidence at a NSW Crime Commission hearing.

Tandy appeared today charged with giving evidence that was false or misleading at two Crime Commission hearings. The other charges served on the 29-year-old forward at Sydney’s Downing Centre Local Court this morning included fresh allegations relating to an earlier game between the Gold Coast Titans and Tandy’s Bulldogs in June 2010, two months before the now infamous Townsville match. Tandy’s solicitor Danny Eid entered pleas of not guilty to all four charges on his client’s behalf.

“He gave false evidence about having placed a bet on an NRL club that the club he was playing for was involved in, namely the Bulldogs vs Titans on June 18,” a police document before the court says.

Detectives from the Racing and Casino investigation unit have also accused Tandy of giving false evidence about “a conversation discussing his position on the field for the kick-off in the North Queensland Cowboys and Canterbury Bulldogs match on August 21, 2010.”

The third new charge relates to lies Tandy allegedly told the hearing about his betting activity and access to his TAB account. It followed an early hearing on January 20, where police allege Tandy gave false evidence about his betting activities with a man, former journalist John Schell.

Tandy remains on bail and his matter will return to court next month. Tandy’s solicitor Danny Eid entered the not guilty pleas as his client sat silently in the front row of the court.

If convicted Tandy faces up to five years in jail.

Related Coverage


Dodgy NRL player manager Sam Ayoub arrested today over match Fixing

Ex player and cheat John Elias was arrested today over the Match Fixing Saga

Your offers for help have amazed me guys!


Hi everybody, hope you all had a great Christmas and have good plans for a fantastic safe (HOT new years eve) New year.I am so happy some of you have put your hand up to help out here and build on what I started and make it a real community. I have been a little indulgent in taking a few days off with the Melbourne Boxing day test on and a recovering from too much everything at Christmas but am nor rearing to go again. I was actually so tempted to jump on and post stuff that was “Shitting me” but thought the country will survive a few days without my insignificant input…

So I have saved all your details and will be getting back to you all in the morning with some great ideas and plans for 2011. What a way to kick it off with the news of the new year. Look out for an email and details on getting signed up as a  wordpress member, as it seems that is required to be a contributor/author here at wordpress. The great thing about that is it enables you to do stories/updates/feedback via email, iphone, the web, any computer etc. So whenever the need arises you can jump on and do your thing.

 

Thanks guys and gals, looking forward to all your obvious expertise. Making this place a better more switched on place…

I am Looking for Contributors for 2011


Some of you may or may not know but I run this website totally on my own for no pay or reward other than helping expose those who need exposing and highlighting things I see happening in our community that I feel are worth bringing to attention…

I love working on the site but I am struggling to keep up, yet I’m very keen to make it bigger and better in 2010.

So How would you like to help expand and build this website.? I am looking for contributors to help with new stories and researching special cases, reviewing books or movies maybe?

Are you willing to get involved? Let me know what you would be interested in, and leave a comment in the form below

You can remain as anonymous or as open as you like all I ask for is a commitment to the cause and accuracy in your contributions

If you want to help in another way you could “Buy me a beer” by clicking a link (not yet operational) and donating a dollar and help get the site fully hosted so we can post full video, audio and other media and documents rather than using you-tube etc.. They have already deleted my account for copyright on news stories…

(not operational just yet!)

 

All the best for Christmas, stay safe, be merry, and for those of you who were not so good this year, there is always next year!

Cheers

CONFIDENTIAL EXPRESSIONS OF INTEREST







NRL betting video is half-back Brad Murray


UPDATE Some sources have identified the man in the betting scandal video as Brad Murray, a half back who signed with Parramatta this year, but has played for Canterbury Bankstown and the Sydney Roosters…more to come on this. Will be blown wide open…

Brad Murray placing bets on failed betting sting

STRIKE Force Suburb detectives have released CCTV footage of a man they hope will help them crack open the possible match fixing allegations surrounding the round 24 NRL match between the Bulldogs and the Cowboys. 

Police have released images of a man who placed one of the first suspicious bets on the match.

The man placed a bet that the first points would come from a North Queensland penalty goal at about 1pm on August 19 at a hotel on Parramatta Road at Flemington.

Over the next two days a suspiciously high number of similar bets were placed, with punters standing to win more than $250,000.

Bulldog prop Ryan Tandy famously lost the ball with his first hit-up of the match and then gave a penalty away in front of the posts.

But the Cowboys rejected the shot at a penalty goal and instead scored a try as the first play of the match.

“As this was one of the earliest bets placed on the game we believe he may have information that can assist our investigation,” said Detective Superintendent Arthur Katsogiannis, commander of the Firearms and Organised Crime Squad.

He said more than 80 people had so far been interviewed, including relevant players from the match, with the man identified in the CCTV footage one of the last unidentified people under investigation.

He said the scandal, being investigated by Strike Force Suburb, risked eroding public confidence in all sport.

“If true, the allegations go to the heart and the integrity of the game,” Det. Supt. Katsogiannis said.

While he would not speculate on if or when charges would be laid, he said he was “very optimistic” about the chance of success.

 

Shinn had $4000 on horse his partner Kathy O'Hara rode


Jockey Blake Shinn had $4000 on his partner and fellow jockey Kathy O'Hara's horse

More to come on these, need to check something…UPDATE LATE TODAY 26/11/10 SHOULD BE CRIMINAL CHARGES, people bet on horses, these bloke are jockeys, how can you trust them? need to set massive deterrent to other jockeys…

SYDNEY jockeys Blake Shinn and Peter Robl were today given lengthy suspensions by Racing NSW stewards for placing bets on races in which they were riding.

Melbourne Cup-winning rider Shinn was disqualified for 15 months and Robl for 12 months following the revelation they bet more than $300,000 over the past two years.

Shinn’s mother Carol and Robl’s wife Elaine were both fined $7500 for being a party to the offences.

Evidence to the inquiry showed Shinn and Robl had bet on both Mrs Shinn and Mrs Robl’s account by phone and the internet.

Jockeys cannot bet on horseracing but are permitted to bet on other sports.

Jockeys Blake Shinn and Peter Robl have pleaded guilty to all charges relating to their illegal betting activities.

The two were charged over placing bets via a Tabcorp account registered to Robl’s wife Elaine.

Elaine Robl has pleaded guilty to two of three charges relating to activity on the account while Shinn’s mother Carol has also pleaded guilty to two of three charges relating to that account.

Blake Shinn also pleaded guilty to a new charge issued by Racing NSW stewards of placing calls from the jockeys‘ room on August 19 which is against the rules.

Telephone records also show he placed calls to his partner, fellow jockey Kathy O’Hara, when she was riding at a Goulburn meeting on August 23.

Shinn admitted to having $4000 on a horse O’Hara rode that day but denied the conversation was about betting. No it was about picking up some eggs on the way home? bloody hell

O’Hara was unavailable for Friday’s inquiry which has been adjourned while stewards consider the not guilty pleas by Elaine Robl and Carol Shinn to the third charge against them.

More on Peter Robl from a Herald Sun story the other day

Busted jockey Peter Robl heads out for race seven at Rosehill Gardens to Hecklers

AS Peter Robl walked into the mounting yard for his first ride at Rosehill Gardens yesterday, the tension was palpable.

Every photographer on course immediately trained their cameras on him, a nervous smile betraying the jockey’s mood.

Then a rowdy punter cut the ice with the comment: “Hey Robl, have you backed this one with Shinn!”

I’m not sure if Robl heard it but those around the punter burst into laughter.

Robl, a laid-back character and one of racing’s genuine nice guys, probably realises he is going to have to put up with these taunts for the rest of his riding career.

He climbed aboard Golestan and gave the horse every chance before finishing fourth behind Scarf.

But only Robl knows what his week from hell has taken from him.

He is embroiled in a betting scandal with fellow jockey Blake Shinn that has rocked NSW racing.

“I’m handling it OK – what can you do?” Robl said with a shrug of the shoulders when asked how he was coping with the pressure of the on-going stewards inquiry. The riding careers of Robl and Shinn are now stuck at the crossroads.

Between them, the two jockeys are alleged to have placed countless bets, totalling more than $500,000, over the last two years on NSW gallops, harness and greyhound races.

Racing NSW stewards aren’t concerned about the bets placed on the trots and dogs, but jockeys wagering on thoroughbred races is a cardinal sin.

Stewards have already laid a total of 12 charges against Robl and Shinn after a sensational opening day of the inquiry last Friday. It was learned that stewards have CCTV footage of Shinn placing bets at inner-city TABs and recordings of Robl using his wife’s TAB telephone betting account.

Charges have also been laid against Robl’s wife, Elaine, and Shinn’s mother, Carol, for their alleged involvement in the betting affair.

With the inquiry expected to reconvene later this week, Racing NSW chief steward Ray Murrihy did reveal racing officials viewed these matters on three levels, which are in descending order:

* JOCKEYS betting against themselves;

* JOCKEYS betting on their own mounts; and

* JOCKEYS betting on races they are not riding in.

Despite the considerable number of bets placed by Shinn and Robl, stewards have found only one instance where either jockey placed a wager on another horse they were riding against.

Shinn invested $2500 on Giresun in a Randwick race back in August when he was riding Diamond Jim.

It proved a losing wager, with Giresun finishing second while Diamond Jim ran fourth.

“Even though I have gambled, I’ve always done my best [on the race track],” Shinn told stewards.

Robl maintains that he has never backed a horse he was riding against.

In fact, stewards have forensically examined every race both jockeys had wagers on and were riding in, and have found no fault with their rides.

If either jockey was found guilty by stewards, talk at the track yesterday was that they faced a riding ban of at least 12 months.

Robl, 38, has already indicated privately that if he was outed, he would probably return to his former home in the Riverina to pick up the pieces of his riding career. A ban for 23-year-old Shinn, who won the Melbourne Cup on Viewed two years ago, would be even more damaging because the young jockey is on the cusp of a hugely successful career in the saddle.

Shinn, who is currently out injured with a broken leg, has placed in real jeopardy his chances of securing international riding contracts in places like Hong Kong and Mauritius in coming years.

The betting scandal engulfing Robl and Shinn isn’t as serious as the notorious 1995 Jockey Tapes, as there is no evidence or suggestion that either jockey is involved in rigging races.

But the scandal has again raised questions about whether riders should be allowed to bet on their own mounts.

Murrihy almost had apoplexy yesterday when I broached this topic with him.

“There is a clear prohibition against jockeys betting and I’m not a supporter of that being changed one iota,” Murrihy said.

“It is such a simplistic approach to say let a jockey bet. One day the jockey might have $10,000 on his horse and knock half the field down trying to win. The next time he rides that horse, he might not back it, so what message does that send?”

Murrihy also defended his decision to hold Friday’s inquiry out in the open.

“The public image and perception of this sport is paramount and that was the primary reason we did not hold the inquiry behind close doors,” he added.

Racing NSW chief executive Peter V’landys refused to comment on the Shinn and Robl case other than to say that both jockeys deserve procedural fairness and natural justice.

But, on a broader issue, he was equally adamant that jockeys betting on races “cannot and will not be tolerated”.

“The entire fabric of the racing industry revolves around integrity and in order to keep public confidence in the sport, jockeys must strictly and conscientiously abide by these rules,” V’landys said.

“One of the assets racing has over the emerging threat of sports betting is that no other sport invests as much as racing does on the integrity issues.

“The punters need to know that not only has racing got to look right, it has to be right.”

Shinn had $4000 on horse his partner Kathy O’Hara rode


Jockey Blake Shinn had $4000 on his partner and fellow jockey Kathy O'Hara's horse

More to come on these, need to check something…UPDATE LATE TODAY 26/11/10 SHOULD BE CRIMINAL CHARGES, people bet on horses, these bloke are jockeys, how can you trust them? need to set massive deterrent to other jockeys…

SYDNEY jockeys Blake Shinn and Peter Robl were today given lengthy suspensions by Racing NSW stewards for placing bets on races in which they were riding.

Melbourne Cup-winning rider Shinn was disqualified for 15 months and Robl for 12 months following the revelation they bet more than $300,000 over the past two years.

Shinn’s mother Carol and Robl’s wife Elaine were both fined $7500 for being a party to the offences.

Evidence to the inquiry showed Shinn and Robl had bet on both Mrs Shinn and Mrs Robl’s account by phone and the internet.

Jockeys cannot bet on horseracing but are permitted to bet on other sports.

Jockeys Blake Shinn and Peter Robl have pleaded guilty to all charges relating to their illegal betting activities.

The two were charged over placing bets via a Tabcorp account registered to Robl’s wife Elaine.

Elaine Robl has pleaded guilty to two of three charges relating to activity on the account while Shinn’s mother Carol has also pleaded guilty to two of three charges relating to that account.

Blake Shinn also pleaded guilty to a new charge issued by Racing NSW stewards of placing calls from the jockeys‘ room on August 19 which is against the rules.

Telephone records also show he placed calls to his partner, fellow jockey Kathy O’Hara, when she was riding at a Goulburn meeting on August 23.

Shinn admitted to having $4000 on a horse O’Hara rode that day but denied the conversation was about betting. No it was about picking up some eggs on the way home? bloody hell

O’Hara was unavailable for Friday’s inquiry which has been adjourned while stewards consider the not guilty pleas by Elaine Robl and Carol Shinn to the third charge against them.

More on Peter Robl from a Herald Sun story the other day

Busted jockey Peter Robl heads out for race seven at Rosehill Gardens to Hecklers

AS Peter Robl walked into the mounting yard for his first ride at Rosehill Gardens yesterday, the tension was palpable.

Every photographer on course immediately trained their cameras on him, a nervous smile betraying the jockey’s mood.

Then a rowdy punter cut the ice with the comment: “Hey Robl, have you backed this one with Shinn!”

I’m not sure if Robl heard it but those around the punter burst into laughter.

Robl, a laid-back character and one of racing’s genuine nice guys, probably realises he is going to have to put up with these taunts for the rest of his riding career.

He climbed aboard Golestan and gave the horse every chance before finishing fourth behind Scarf.

But only Robl knows what his week from hell has taken from him.

He is embroiled in a betting scandal with fellow jockey Blake Shinn that has rocked NSW racing.

“I’m handling it OK – what can you do?” Robl said with a shrug of the shoulders when asked how he was coping with the pressure of the on-going stewards inquiry. The riding careers of Robl and Shinn are now stuck at the crossroads.

Between them, the two jockeys are alleged to have placed countless bets, totalling more than $500,000, over the last two years on NSW gallops, harness and greyhound races.

Racing NSW stewards aren’t concerned about the bets placed on the trots and dogs, but jockeys wagering on thoroughbred races is a cardinal sin.

Stewards have already laid a total of 12 charges against Robl and Shinn after a sensational opening day of the inquiry last Friday. It was learned that stewards have CCTV footage of Shinn placing bets at inner-city TABs and recordings of Robl using his wife’s TAB telephone betting account.

Charges have also been laid against Robl’s wife, Elaine, and Shinn’s mother, Carol, for their alleged involvement in the betting affair.

With the inquiry expected to reconvene later this week, Racing NSW chief steward Ray Murrihy did reveal racing officials viewed these matters on three levels, which are in descending order:

* JOCKEYS betting against themselves;

* JOCKEYS betting on their own mounts; and

* JOCKEYS betting on races they are not riding in.

Despite the considerable number of bets placed by Shinn and Robl, stewards have found only one instance where either jockey placed a wager on another horse they were riding against.

Shinn invested $2500 on Giresun in a Randwick race back in August when he was riding Diamond Jim.

It proved a losing wager, with Giresun finishing second while Diamond Jim ran fourth.

“Even though I have gambled, I’ve always done my best [on the race track],” Shinn told stewards.

Robl maintains that he has never backed a horse he was riding against.

In fact, stewards have forensically examined every race both jockeys had wagers on and were riding in, and have found no fault with their rides.

If either jockey was found guilty by stewards, talk at the track yesterday was that they faced a riding ban of at least 12 months.

Robl, 38, has already indicated privately that if he was outed, he would probably return to his former home in the Riverina to pick up the pieces of his riding career. A ban for 23-year-old Shinn, who won the Melbourne Cup on Viewed two years ago, would be even more damaging because the young jockey is on the cusp of a hugely successful career in the saddle.

Shinn, who is currently out injured with a broken leg, has placed in real jeopardy his chances of securing international riding contracts in places like Hong Kong and Mauritius in coming years.

The betting scandal engulfing Robl and Shinn isn’t as serious as the notorious 1995 Jockey Tapes, as there is no evidence or suggestion that either jockey is involved in rigging races.

But the scandal has again raised questions about whether riders should be allowed to bet on their own mounts.

Murrihy almost had apoplexy yesterday when I broached this topic with him.

“There is a clear prohibition against jockeys betting and I’m not a supporter of that being changed one iota,” Murrihy said.

“It is such a simplistic approach to say let a jockey bet. One day the jockey might have $10,000 on his horse and knock half the field down trying to win. The next time he rides that horse, he might not back it, so what message does that send?”

Murrihy also defended his decision to hold Friday’s inquiry out in the open.

“The public image and perception of this sport is paramount and that was the primary reason we did not hold the inquiry behind close doors,” he added.

Racing NSW chief executive Peter V’landys refused to comment on the Shinn and Robl case other than to say that both jockeys deserve procedural fairness and natural justice.

But, on a broader issue, he was equally adamant that jockeys betting on races “cannot and will not be tolerated”.

“The entire fabric of the racing industry revolves around integrity and in order to keep public confidence in the sport, jockeys must strictly and conscientiously abide by these rules,” V’landys said.

“One of the assets racing has over the emerging threat of sports betting is that no other sport invests as much as racing does on the integrity issues.

“The punters need to know that not only has racing got to look right, it has to be right.”