Jenny Lee Cook, bizzare Suicide or something else?

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This case of Jenny Lee Cook who died on January 19 2009 has been bought to my attention so I thought I would pop it up and at the very least folks have a read and give me your thoughts. IT is tragic for the family when suicide just does not seem right and a rushed bungled investigation adds to the concerns they rightly have.

The Corners Inquest Findings

On the surface it’s one of Australia‘s more bizarre suicides. But the family of the victim believes in a more sinister truth.

"A very bright, active girl": Jenny Lee Cook horse riding before her back injury.“A very bright, active girl”: Jenny Lee Cook horse riding before her back injury.

It’s a quiet Monday night in Townsville and an ambulance radio crackles to life in the car park of the far north Queensland city’s main hospital.

It’s a Code 1A: a woman in her early 30s has suffered an apparent cardiac arrest. Lights flashing, siren on, the two paramedics on board, Robert Haydon and Chris O’Connor, accelerate through the thinning evening traffic, hoping to find the woman still alive.

The destination is a residential property in Douglas – a suburb popular with young families that sprawls along the southern banks of the Ross River, about eight kilometres from the CBD. Pulling up in front of a new residence in Sheerwater Parade, they note the outside of the property is in darkness, and unlike some triple-0 calls, nobody is waiting outside. Within moments the two men are knocking on the front door, yelling “Queensland Ambulance Service“.

Jenny Lee and Paul at home.Jenny Lee and Paul at home.

A tall, thick-set, blond man, Paul Cook, a local prison guard, answers the door and says that his wife, Jenny Lee, is lying out the back. Haydon thinks he looks upset, but to O’Connor, Cook appears unemotional as he ushers them through the house, out into the backyard and on to the side of the property. Here the two paramedics are confronted with a horrific sight.

It’s the body of a woman, lying on her left side on a bloodstained plywood board, with her legs folded backwards. There are spots of congealed blood on her forehead and the left side of her chest. She’s wearing shorts, runners, and a sun hat. Strangely, what looks like a section of a sheet has been wrapped around the back of her head, partly obscuring her face, and a bathrobe tie is secured around her throat.

The woman looks as if she’s been dead for some time, her outstretched arms apparently stiff from rigor mortis, but it’s the job of the two paramedics to make sure. Haydon kneels carefully alongside the body, attaches electrodes to her limbs, and finds no signs of life. But as Haydon is about to get to his feet, something very sharp presses into his back and he springs forward. Shining their torches in the direction of the object, the two paramedics are startled to see a large, bloodstained knife poking out from the wall, its handle tightly bound in string and tape and wedged firmly in the gap between the steel window frame and the concrete wall.

"It was so sharp": The bloodstained knife on which it is claimed Jenny Lee Cook impaled herself.“It was so sharp”: The bloodstained knife on which it is claimed Jenny Lee Cook impaled herself.

Haydon immediately radios the ambulance dispatcher to notify the police. He explains that the paramedics are at a likely crime scene, and the cops need to get here as soon as possible.

When the first police arrive at the scene, they find Paul Cook sitting hunched at the kitchen bench moaning. On another bench opposite are his wife’s handbag and some documents.

One of the officers asks him if his wife was on any medication and Cook obliquely says his wife had a bad back, was on antidepressants and was involved in a difficult WorkCover claim.

A police drawing of the scene.A police drawing of the scene.

The reference to antidepressants suggests something was not quite right about Jenny Lee – a hint of emotional instability, perhaps – and maybe even a predisposition to suicide. “She never told me she even thought about killing herself,” Cook would later tell detectives, not even raising the possibility that she may have met with foul play.

He explains to Sergeant Kay Osborn and Constable Damien Cotter, who were tasked to interview him at the scene, that he arrived home at around 6.45pm, and was surprised to find the dog locked up on the property’s front balcony and Jenny Lee nowhere to be seen. He was relieved that she was out – things hadn’t been going well in their marriage. But then he noticed her belongings were still lying about, although her runners weren’t in their usual place. So he decided to take the dog for a walk through the scrubby bushland at the end of Sheerwater Parade.

A short time later he returned home, downed a soft drink, jumped into the shower and began to wonder where Jenny Lee was. He became much more concerned after noticing that a large knife was missing from the kitchen block. He sent his wife a text, and when there was no reply began to search outside. That’s when he came across the body. “She was cold and she was stiff and I moved her lips back and they didn’t [move],” he tells the two detectives. That’s why he didn’t attempt to do CPR, he explains.

'Til death do us part: Paul and Jenny Lee Cook on their wedding day in 1998.
‘Til death do us part: Paul and Jenny Lee Cook on their wedding day in 1998.

During the course of their discussion in the kitchen and another formal interview later that night, Cook repeats his certainty that Jenny Lee killed herself – although he has no idea how she did it. “She had blood coming out of her mouth … what did she do?” he asks Detective Cotter.

Later, Cook says when he first saw her body he thought Jenny had jumped on the knife or she had overdosed. He also talks about the knife, saying, “It was so sharp, that knife, like a f…ing sword or something – I don’t know why I even bought it.”

He tells detectives that he used the knife only two or three times, later changing this to two or three times a year, the first of a series of contradictions in a long and rambling interview in which he revealed that all wasn’t exactly rosy in the Sheerwater Parade house.

Paul Cook.
Paul Cook.

Paul tells the interviewing detectives that while they “never fought”, Jenny Lee would have “a sook” about her chronic back problems “hundreds of times” and would “crack the shits” and be “a moody bitch”. Only the night before, he explains, he’d arrived home to find Jenny Lee sitting on the toilet in the bathroom crying. Ignoring her tears, he asked where his earbuds were, put them on, went to bed and fell asleep.

He admits that he’d set off for work that morning barely speaking to her, and later that day told a colleague that his marriage was over. Asked about his movements, Cook tells police that he left his job as a prison guard at Townsville Correctional Centre about midday to pay a bill at a computer shop for repairs to his laptop, then returned to the jail about 12.30pm. Strangely, the credit card payment receipt in his wallet shows the bill was paid at 12.23pm – giving him the almost impossible task of travelling the eight or so kilometres back to the jail, negotiating a number of intersections and traffic lights, by 12.30pm. He also tells police that he had sent an email to the shop, but the shop has no record of receiving any such email that day.

Within 20 hours of arriving at the scene on that steamy January night, the police decide that Jenny Lee (a woman who hated needles and blood and had a big enough stash of pain medication to overdose if she wanted to) had – without leaving behind any note -blindfolded herself, tied a belt around her neck, put a sheet over the top of her head and deliberately thrust her body on to the knife before slumping to the ground and bleeding to death.

Jenny Lee's parents, Lorraine and Terry Pullen.
Jenny Lee’s parents, Lorraine and Terry Pullen. Photo: Debrah Novak

Less than two days after the death, the Sheerwater Parade house is cleared of being a crime scene and Cook is allowed access to potentially important evidentiary exhibits such as the plywood board, still lying in the backyard. There is no dusting for fingerprints on the knife, no DNA test of the board, no search of the house for traces of the string or tape used to wedge the knife into the wall and no follow-through on Cook’s alibi.

Jenny Lee’s death is deemed non-suspicious, a clear case of suicide. But if it’s a suicide, it’s clearly one of the most extraordinary to have ever occurred in Australia: the Queensland suicide register and the National Coronial Information System have no record of female suicide by self-impalement.

Shortly after her death, Cook cashed in Jenny Lee’s WorkCover settlement and superannuation, which along with the sale of the Sheerwater Parade house, amounted to about $800,000.

It will take four years of unwavering determination by Jenny Lee’s parents, Lorraine and Terry Pullen, to have an inquest held into their daughter’s bizarre and tragic death. The inquest will also query a suspected affair between him and an attractive female prison guard (although both claimed this commenced after Jenny Lee’s death). Mainly, though, the inquest will reveal startling omissions in the police investigation into Jenny Lee’s death, and the destruction of a key piece of evidence – the bloody knife – before the coroner could properly investigate.

On the day Jenny Lee diedJanuary 19, 2009 – Lorraine rang her daughter a couple of times, but she didn’t pick up. Just before 9pm, Jenny Lee’s dad, Terry, phoned Lorraine with the terrible news and Lorraine rushed to Townsville.

So many things just didn’t add up for Lorraine. For starters, she couldn’t believe that Jenny Lee didn’t leave a suicide note. “I don’t believe she would have gone without saying goodbye. She always wrote notes and letters,” she says. Nor did Lorraine buy the scenario of her daughter impaling herself. “Jenny Lee would run from a needle. She was frightened of sharp things.”

Jenny Lee was the type who would have left directions about who was to look after the dog, insists Lorraine, and who would get what. “We had an extremely close relationship and I don’t believe she would go without telling me or asking for help.”

After Lorraine arrived at the house, Cook took her outside and showed her where Jenny Lee had died. (“He said he didn’t want any ghosts in the house,” adds Lorraine.) She recalls Cook saying something about Jenny Lee putting on her running shoes so she wouldn’t slip when she ran onto the knife, she says, but Cook would later deny ever making such as statement.

Then there was the presence of one of Cook’s female work colleagues. The woman dropped by five days after the death to clean Jenny Lee’s car, which had to be returned to James Cook University (JCU), where she worked as a water nutrient analyst. “Call it a woman’s instinct but I knew they were close,” Lorraine said after she saw the woman with Cook in the kitchen.

Lorraine says that both she and her husband have been in a personal hell trying to unravel what happened to their daughter. “I lie awake at night and it just goes round and round in my head. For 18 months afterwards I had this pain in the chest, like someone had stabbed me. I’m so frustrated and angry. If it had been [a police officer's] daughter, things would have been done properly. We don’t think Jenny Lee would be capable of doing something like this.”

The 29-year-old had met Cook more than 10 years earlier, while she was studying at James Cook University. At the time the pretty redhead had been in the midst of fulfilling her ambition of becoming a marine biologist and was enrolled at the university’s well-regarded marine sciences program. She had moved to Townsville from her family farm near Macksville, a small NSW coastal town midway between Sydney and Brisbane with a population of about 3000.

Jenny Lee’s childhood had been that of a carefree country kid running wild on her parents’ banana farm, riding dirt bikes around the hills and galloping her horse along the area’s unspoiled beaches, says Lorraine, a retired theatre nurse who still lives on the farm with Terry. “She was a very bright, active girl – she wouldn’t sit on your knee for long,” recalls Lorraine. “When she and her sister were little and they were naughty they would run and climb up the mango tree. I couldn’t get them and they would stay there till I started laughing.”

From an early age the ocean fascinated Jenny Lee, and at age 15 she was already writing to university professors for advice about how to become a marine biologist. In 1998 she gained entry to JCU and moved to Townsville to study. Like many of the young students, she partied in a nightclub scene overflowing with young single men from the nearby military base, Lavarack Barracks – one of the largest garrisons in the country. One night, in a nightclub called The Playpen, the 19-year-old met a handsome young soldier, Paul Cook. The couple were soon dating and within six months Cook proposed.

The wedding was held on Magnetic Island, off Townsville, on November 8, 1998. The video shows a handsome couple – Cook, looking like a tall, solid, Amish farmer with his blond thatch of hair and moustache-less beard, stands about 15 centimetres taller than Jenny Lee, whose curly red hair and white dress conjure up images of a mediaeval princess.

At first, friends recall, they seemed like a devoted couple who did everything together: grocery shopping, cooking, hiking and camping around the rainforests of north Queensland. But things changed in 2007. While attempting to lug heavy buckets of water samples back to a lab at James Cook University for analysis, Jenny Lee seriously injured her back. Over the space of nearly 18 months she underwent two operations that left her virtually immobile and cut off from most of her work friends while she slowly recovered. She put in a WorkCover claim, which led her to see a psychologist, which in turn led to her taking anti-depressants and major pain medication.

Cook, meantime, had left the army and started working as a prison guard at the Townsville Correctional Centre, a jail about 12 kilometres west of the city. As a workplace, it seemed to foster controversial personal relationships. “The prisoners were nice – it was the workers you had to worry about,” says one guard who worked with Cook at the sprawling jail, which has a farm, a high-security men’s jail and a women’s prison.

The guard, who asked not to be named, told Good Weekend that the sex scandals that occurred there were on a scale that “you wouldn’t believe”, with warders often quitting over allegations they were having inappropriate contact with each other, or with prisoners. As recently as last year, the jail’s hot-house staff relationships were still making headlines in local papers, including manager Andrew Pike quitting after allegations were published alleging he’d had an affair with a junior female clerk who also worked in his office – a scenario exposed by posts from the woman’s jilted boyfriend on Facebook.

Whether Jenny Lee knew about this workplace environment it’s hard to say, but she certainly had concerns about a tall, striking-looking female guard in her late 20s who was regularly rostered on to work with Cook. “Jenny confronted Paul, who denied there was anything between them,” says a friend of the couple, who, like others Good Weekend spoke to, did not want to be identified.

In the months leading up to her death, Jenny Lee had never given any indication to her family of problems in the marriage other than a brief conversation with her father in which she implied that sexual intimacy with Cook was difficult because of her back injury.

Towards the end of 2008, friends recalled her enthusiasm about returning to work at JCU on reduced duties. Her doctors thought her depression, brought on by her chronic back problems, was in remission and that she was not a suicide risk (she had previously admitted to thoughts of “cutting herself” in the depths of her despair after her second operation, one doctor would later claim). The couple also moved into their dream home in Sheerwater Parade in November – a new, two-storey, brick-veneer home with four bedrooms, only a couple of minutes’ walk from the river. Life was starting to look up again.

The first sign of trouble on January 19 at the Cooks’ home was a barking dog. Trying to sleep in the house across the road was Janice Cavanagh, recuperating from shoulder surgery, and the noise was keeping her awake.

The barking got worse around lunchtime when the animal began making what Cavanagh would call a “crying” sound that seemed to go on for hours. She got up and thought: “Should I go over and see if it’s caught somewhere?” But because she didn’t know the Cooks, who had only moved into the new home two months before, she decided to stay put. The barking stopped around 4.30pm. About two hours later, around 6.45pm, another neighbour saw Cook drive up and chatted to him before he went inside.

These and other statements were made to coronial investigators for an inquest that was held late last year. The statements highlighted questions and contradictions in Paul Cook’s account of events on the day of his wife’s death, and shortcomings in the initial investigation. For instance, Cook told police that his movements could be easily confirmed by the jail’s CCTV cameras. But detectives never checked, and in any case, renovations were being undertaken at the jail at the time and the cameras at the entry and exit gates weren’t working. Jail logbooks, which had Cook entering the jail at 7.30 on the morning of his wife’s death and leaving at 12.49pm, were also incomplete, with no record of him re-entering the prison that day.

Maderline Ronan, another prison employee who was rostered on with Cook that day, described him in her statement to the inquest as “very quiet” and didn’t know where he was between 11am and 1.30pm. Later in the afternoon, Cook told her he had a headache and finished up early, around 5.30pm. This raised questions about where he had been until 6.45pm, when he arrived home, as the drive between the jail and Sheerwater Parade is about 15 minutes. (Jenny Lee was suspected of dying some time between 8am and 2pm, according to the autopsy.)

Cook’s statements to police indicate he was increasingly frustrated by his wife’s pessimism and depression, such as on the night before her death, when he ignored her sadness and crying and went to bed early with his earbuds in. But his later account to WorkCover was radically different: “That night in bed she cried as she told me of her pain and her concerns about her work future, which had been reinforced at the functional capacity evaluation. I hugged her till she fell asleep,” he said.

Asked at the inquest about the contradiction, he painted a strange picture. He said he had both hugged Jenny Lee and ignored her and then they both fell asleep sharing his headphones and listening to a Phil Collins song he hated.

At the subsequent inquest, Cook calmly gave evidence for nearly three-quarters of a day, without legal representation. He denied having any role in Jenny Lee’s death. Coroner Jane Bentley would later describe him as being “deliberately untruthful” in his evidence, adding that it was likely he had given different representation for the purposes of his WorkCover claim.

Cook claimed that his relationship with the unidentified work colleague prior to Jenny Lee’s death had been strictly professional, with the romance only starting a couple of months afterwards. It began with kiss in a pool at a barbecue after a few drinks and evolved into a relationship with sexual events but not intercourse, he said. Asked how many times he would have phoned or texted this woman before Jenny’s death, he said he would be surprised if it was more than five times. But when confronted with records that showed 52 calls or texts he said: “Obviously I was talking to her a lot more than I’m remembering, but we didn’t have any relationship before that other than friends”.

In her statement, fellow worker Maderline Ronan alleged she’d seen Facebook photographs of Cook socialising at drinks functions with this woman prior to Jenny Lee’s death. Bizarrely, eight months after the death, the same woman was at the centre of a violent row when she was caught by her former de facto “canoodling”, as the Townsville Bulletin headlines put it, in a prison van with a fellow guard. (The woman, whose name was suppressed in the inquest, made a statement to coronial investigators and did not appear at the inquest. After being asked for comment by Good Weekend she said, “I’ve heard about your Paul Cook stuff and I’ve got nothing to say.”)

Coroner Bentley’s findings, handed down in November last year, were damning of the police’s failure to properly investigate and the failure to follow procedures such as failing to retain the knife. But she delivered an “open finding” into Jenny Lee’s death, saying she was unable to determine whether the Townsville woman’s death was suicide or murder.

Sheerwater parade, Townsville, has changed little since Jenny Lee’s death. The homes are still well kept, with dazzlingly clean driveways and manicured lawns lushly greened by the tropical weather. Most residents have largely forgotten the dreadful tragedy that occurred in their sleepy patch of surburbia.

Those who do remember the couple have nothing bad to say about Paul Cook, with one describing him as a “gentle giant”. (Cook, after initially offering to answer any questions supplied by Good Weekend, later withdrew his co-operation, saying in an email, “I’m not going to comment, sorry.”

In the meantime, Jenny Lee’s parents have not given up the quest to find out what happened to their daughter. Lorraine has just been in Townsville once again, walking in her daughter’s footsteps on the streets of Douglas, in the city centre, and at James Cook University, showing photographs of Jenny Lee and Cook to locals. “It might make somebody remember what they saw,” she says.


 

Police yet to act on bungled ‘suicide’ investigation

July 19, 2014

Investigative journalist

Email Rory

Police have failed to act on a recommendation to take action over an apparently bungled investigation into the impalement death of a NSW woman in Townsville.

The incident is the latest twist in the extraordinary case of Macksville woman Jenny Lee Cook, who was found dead in 2009 after seemingly impaling herself on a kitchen knife wedged into a wall at the North Queensland home she shared with her prison guard husband, Paul James Cook.

Queensland police took fewer than 24 hours to write the death off as a suicide despite Mrs Cook, 29, not leaving a note and there being no other case in the Queensland suicide register or other coroner databases of a woman killing herself in such a way.

They also failed to fingerprint the knife, search the house for articles used to jam the knife in the wall, check on her husband’s whereabouts around the time of death, or seize important potential exhibits or DNA test them.

The knife used in the killing was destroyed before further tests or investigation by the coroner’s team could take place.

Mr Cook, who found his wife’s body, has denied any involvement in the death. He did admit there had been problems in the marriage.

As a result of his wife’s death he received $800,000, which included money from her life insurance, a work cover claim she had been pursuing, her superannuation and from the sale of their house.

After years of lobbying, Mrs Cook’s parents, Lorraine and Terry Pullen, late last year convinced Queensland authorities to hold an inquest into the death.

Coroner Jane Bentley found Mr Cook evasive and untruthful in his evidence and said because of the problems with the investigation she could not make a finding of suicide.

She recommended the Commissioner of Police consider whether any action should be taken into the inadequacy of the investigation.

This week – more than six months after the ruling – the Queensland Police Service have not acted.

A QPS spokesman said: “Ethical Standards Command continues to overview the review of the coronial file in relation to the death of Jenny Lee Cook. It is anticipated this matter will be finalised in the near future”.

The counsel representing the deceased family in the inquest, Marjorie Pagani, said she had been shocked at the way the investigation was conducted.

“I was appalled by the shoddiness of the investigation and what appeared to be total disregard for the proper coronial and police process and this has resulted in primary and most significant evidence having been destroyed under police authority, despite an ongoing inquest,” she said.

“The impact on the entire family was tragic. They felt as though they have been done a severe injustice because of police processes and they will probably never forgive the people responsible.”

Fairfax Media has also learnt that contradictions in some of the statements were never put to some of the witnesses during the inquest, and that a woman who was alleged to have had a relationship with Mr Cook soon after Mrs Cook’s death was also never called to give evidence. Her name has been suppressed.

The Pullens have called for the inquest to be reopened and for the suppression of the woman’s name to be lifted.

The coroner’s office said the name was suppressed because of allegations of an extra-marital affair.


 

How did Jenny Cook die?

How did Jenny Cook die?

Jenny’s family outside court

TOWNSVILLE woman Jenny Lee Cook was quirky and fun, had an infectious laugh, and was conquering milestones from a young age.

Her mother Lorraine Pullen recalled her daughter, with a big grin on her face, climbing to the top of a step ladder before she was 18 months old.

“Her first attempt at putting on makeup (she was) about two – eye shadow, rouge and lipstick, and plenty of it. Like face painting,” Mrs Pullen said.

Jenny learned to ride motorbikes at four, enjoyed horse riding and loved her Boxer dog, Nikeisha.

In happier times, Jenny and husband Paul Cook would often be seen walking Nikeisha around the streets of Douglas in the evenings.

But on January 19, 2009, something “bizarre and unusual” occurred at their immaculate home.

Mrs Cook, 29, was found dead, her body lying on a piece of plywood in the side garden by Mr Cook.

Her death was “prematurely” deemed a suicide but there were many questions unanswered.

Was she murdered? Did her husband do it? Was the police investigation adequate?

Coroner Jane Bentley convened an inquest in Townsville this week in a bid to find answers to those questions.

They are questions that have lingered for Jenny’s parents for years, but a “vastly inadequate” police investigation and the destruction of a key piece of evidence means they may never get answers.

The lack of investigation by police was slammed by barrister Kerri Mellifont QC during closing submissions yesterday, with chief investigator Detective Senior Sergeant Kay Osborn recommended for disciplinary action or re-training.

During the five day inquest, the court heard Mrs Cook, a nutrient analyst at James Cook University, had been on anti-depressants and suffered back pain following a workplace accident several years prior to her death, and had been involved in protracted negotiations for compensation.

On the day of her death, Mr Cook, a former prison officer, came home but could not find his wife.

He sent her a text message at 7.38pm but heard her phone in the house, and noticed a knife missing from the knife block.

He found her body lying on a large sheet of plywood, with a sheet or bandage covering her face, and a large knife, wrapped in string and secured with tape, wedged between a security screen and a window.

No suicide note was located and an autopsy found she died from a wound to her chest.

Paramedic Robert Hayden told the court Mr Cook appeared “upset” when they arrived at the house.

He said rigor mortis had set in, but he could not estimate how long Mrs Cook had been dead.

Detective Senior Constable Damien Cotter, Det Sen Sgt Osborn’s partner, said he formed the view Mrs Cook’s death was a suicide after Professor David Williams gave a verbal preliminary report that her wound was “consistent” with a self-inflicted injury.

Barrister Marjorie Pagani, for Mrs Cook’s parents, asked whether the wound could also be consistent with a person being pushed on to a knife. He replied “yes”.

A NSW forensic officer also could not rule out the possibility she was pushed on to the knife.

Police released the scene shortly after hearing Prof William’s preliminary findings — less than 20 hours after the first call to triple zero.

Det Sen Const Cotter said he was not aware of any other investigations after the scene was released, but said police treated it as a homicide until they received the preliminary autopsy findings.

Both Ms Mellifont and Ms Pagani criticised how quickly police concluded Mrs Cook’s death was self-inflicted.

Mr Cook was asked if he played a role in his wife’s death. He said “no”.

He was questioned about his relationship with a female colleague, ­referred to only as the “unnamed ­female”.

Phone records show he made 52 texts or calls to the woman in the six weeks before his wife’s death. He made only 14 contacts with his wife, by text or call, between November 3, 2008 and January 19, 2009.

He denied having an extra-marital affair with the unnamed woman but a friend confirmed they had a physical relationship in the weeks after his wife’s death.

It was revealed police never investigated Mr Cook’s movements on the day his wife died, or confirmed his version of events, whether he had any financial motive, or if he was having any extra-marital affairs.

Ms Mellifont conceded, in closing submissions, that Mr Cook could be completely innocent, but the lack of investigation by police had let him and Mrs Cook’s parents down.

But Det Sen Sgt Osborn could face disciplinary proceedings after authorising the destruction of the knife.

She denied knowing a coroner could request exhibits, saying she believed the knife could be destroyed because the police investigation was done.

Coroner Jane Bentley is expected to hand down her findings on Friday.

Mrs Cook’s friend Dee, who sat through proceedings, said Mrs Cook was the kindest person.

“Soft by nature, and extremely helpful,” she said. “She was not confrontational or violent in any way.

“It (the way she died) was so violent. For someone who was such a planner it’s hard to comprehend she made such a permanent solution without a note or list for anyone.”


Coronial inquest into the death of Jenny Lee Cook

A CORONIAL inquest is examining whether Jenny Lee Cook, a young Townsville woman whose 2009 death was deemed a suicide, was actually murdered, with the police investigation into her death also in the spotlight.

At the centre of the mystery is a large knife, wrapped in string and tape, located wedged between a security screen and a window.

The hearing, which began before Coroner Jane Bentley in Townsville on Monday, was asked by Mrs Cook’s parents Lorraine and Terry Pullen.

The inquest heard Mrs Cook, 29, a nutrient analyst at James Cook University, had lived with her husband Paul James Cook in Douglas before her body was found in the side garden on January 19, 2009.

On the opening day of the inquest, barrister Kerri Mellifont, QC, said Mr Cook arrived home about 7pm, but could not find his wife.

He took their dog Nikeisha, a boxer, for a walk and when he returned Mrs Cook was nowhere to be found.

Mr Cook sent his wife a text message at 7.38pm but heard her phone in the house and noticed a knife missing from the knife block. He found Mrs Cook in a pool of blood at the side of their house.

Ms Mellifont said no suicide note was located and an autopsy revealed her cause of death was a wound to the left side of her chest.

The inquest heard Mrs Cook had been on anti-depressants and suffered back pain following a workplace accident several years before her death and had been involved in protracted negotiations for compensation.

Detective Senior Constable Damien Cotter, a plain clothes officer in 2009, said the scene was released back to Mr Cook after preliminary results from the pathologist concluded Mrs Cook’s injuries were consistent with being self-inflicted.

Barrister Marjorie Pagani, for Mr and Mrs Pullen, asked whether those same injuries could be consistent with a person being pushed on to a knife.

Det Sen Constable Cotter replied “yes”.

The inquest heard Mrs Cook had been upset and crying the night before her death, with Mr Cook saying he hugged her and they lay in bed listening to music. He said that looking back, there were signs his wife needed help.

On the night Mr Cook found his wife’s body, he said it was obvious she had been dead for a while. He recalled being instructed to do CPR, but her mouth was black with blood.

“I dropped the phone, put my hands on the lawn and grabbed the grass. I think I screamed,” Mr Cook said.

Mr Cook was also questioned about his relationship with a female colleague, ­referred to as the “unnamed ­female”.

Phone records showed Mr Cook made 52 contacts, by text or call, to the unidentified female in the six weeks before his wife’s death.

In comparison, he made 14 contacts with his wife, by text or call, between November 3, 2008 and January 19, 2009.

The inquest heard Mr Cook made a claim against his wife’s life insurance in the weeks after her death, and also sold the marital home for $570,000.

Ms Mellifont asked Mr Cook if he had any involvement in his wife’s death. “No,” he said.

The inquest continues today.

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THE FATHER, THE SON AND THE HOLY….INTEREST?


Actually, that’s a little misleading because Nigel’s only mentionable moment from today was my initial sighting of him wearing a charcoal grey suit… which obviously is indicative of the his ongoing battle with depression (rolling my eyes). He’s really painted himself into a corner with that one. Until he starts appearing in brightly coloured sarongs and a colourful headscarf or a purple onesie to match EBC’s puffer jacket, I think it’s safe to say he needs to be started on a course of Zoloft.

Before I start today’s wrap-up, a word of warning. My writing style is such that at times it will be serious and at times it will be very ‘tongue-in-cheek’, sarcastic and cynical. It is IN NO WAY meant to be offensive to anyone, especially not to Allison’s friends and family; it is more to highlight the ridiculous nature of the defendant’s and defense counsel’s claims. I will try to keep this as balanced an account of the day as I can. These are my opinions and insights and mine only. And Gerry will either back me up or provide a different interpretation, both of which I’m sure we all welcome. All the references to GBC being a murderer are ALLEGED only. He has not been convicted of any crime. Yet. And with that, we’re off…..!

First port of call was coffee to keep me alive (post-university semester fatigue has set in) and then off to Courtroom 17 to track down Gerryrocks. I immediately sought out the man in the purple shirt, who greeted me warmly and ushered me down to level 5 to point out the main ‘players’.

THE BC’s: To me they didn’t look like the enemy, they didn’t look evil or horrible, despite what I suspect they were involved in with their son. They don’t even really look like they do on the news. They just look like normal, average, run-of-the-mill citizens… who happened to raise a narcissistic sociopath… which is fine, because every family should have one. Every family should not, however, have a minimum of two… and that was the only vibe I could really pick up. They are otherwise flat, unreadable. NBC radiates austerity and haughtiness and EBC is his sidekick. Like Batman and Robin. Turner and Hooch. Rocky and Bullwinkle. Together until the end, fighting perceived injustices… or at least until the cameras stop rolling.

And we have a late entrant, ladies and gentleman. Fresh off the plane from Canadia (thank you, Prime Minister Abbott) was the brother, Adam BC. Confirmation from some journalists sent Gerry and I into a tailspin… “What’s he doing here? Do they think the situation is that dire? Is this another show of solidarity? Are they all here so that after court they can pop over to the Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages to insert ‘Baden’ into their names a second time, to become the BBC’s… just to reinforce the message?” … No answers came forth but we were hoping it was Question 2 in our streams of consciousness.

THE DICKIES, by comparison, are soft and nurturing individuals. I got a small smile from Priscilla as she passed me to go downstairs and she is quite clearly like one of those bake-at-home cookies that is firm (resilient) on the outside but gooey (caring & loving) on the inside. Geoff seemed to be a strong but gentle man whose heart has been irreparably broken. It was their eyes that affected me the most. I don’t know these people, I’ve never met them. I probably won’t ever meet them. And I don’t normally put a lot of stock in first impressions, despite how it may seem. But their resilience, their pain and their passion were reflected in their eyes and it touched me to the point where tears pricked the back of my own eyes. This whole moment took maybe 5 seconds but it was long enough to know who the fighters were and who the grandstanders were.

With all the excitement of the afternoon, I nearly forgot about our first witness – Dr Bruce Flegg. He’s copped a beating outside the courtroom and over the water coolers in the office but the reality is that I thought he was a great witness. He was well-spoken, believable and clearly sticking to his guns about the screams he heard that night when under fire from the defense on cross-examination. I found the way he explained the screams to be quite chilling and I could actually hear them in my head as he described the “single, reverse crescendo, tapering off scream…2-3 seconds long” that indicated a “reduced level of consciousness”. He maintains he only ever hears sounds in his area from the north-east where the showgrounds are located and it’s so quiet that at times he can hear individual voices. So to me, it doesn’t seem odd he heard these 2 screams given that 593 Brookfield Road is almost exactly on the imaginary north-east line from BF’s elevated property. He also seemed genuinely distressed about the incident on the stand, and obviously at the time as he noted down the exact time the first scream took place… 10:53pm. One hour after the old ‘spider scream’ from Apps’ daughter. He didn’t hear anything else that night after arriving home at 7:30-8:00… which would indicate to me that either he was cooking or showering (or something noisy) when Apps’ screams pierced the night in Brookfield OR Apps’ screams never actually happened. Either is possible. Yes, multiple screams were heard that night but it’s odd to me that there was all this bloody screaming going on! What are the odds that these 2 incidents occurred on the same night, really?

During this witness’ testimony, GBC was sitting with hands clasped, looking straight ahead or down, stoic and unmoved. From what I could tell. He’s tiny on the screen. I want to take binoculars tomorrow!

Once we started dealing with the financials, BF seemed to become a little bit more detached but no less believable. I also picked up something else that I’m not quite sure about but I suspect he was pis- …..annoyed. Very annoyed. His name has been forever tarnished with GBC’s deeds. His safe, caring community has been changed by the death of one of its members and the incarceration of another of its members for allegedly causing that death. Three young girls have had their world destroyed and will now grow up without one parent; or (plausibly) both parents. The aftershocks of the crime have been felt throughout his community; the community he stands for. Whatever else he’s done, whatever else he’s been involved in, I don’t know. I don’t care. But I DO believe he is genuine in his distress and emotional response to ABC’s death and the effect on the community and I believe he was there today to see justice done.

The financial aspect here is interesting. In December 2011, GBC put in repeated calls to BF. Eventually they were returned and a catch up at GBC’s offices was organised. It was here that GBC confided his business woes… money was owed to partners who had left the business and he needed to raise $400K. Just a small amount. No biggie. BF asked who the partners were and GBC declined to answer. BF asked if he wanted an equity partner (I think that’s what it’s called) and again, GBC said no. He didn’t want a new partner, he wanted the cash.

Now…………..this will become clearer once I get to the cash injection by GBC’s Holy Trinity: The Crannar, the Cheesman and the Christ… but basically the $400K cash would go a LONG way to repaying the $360K he owed Christ and Cheesman and knock $40K off the $96K he owed Crannar. That’s just how I see it. He may have had other uses for it… eg. plastic surgery and ‘disappearing’, buying a 4th mistress and so on….. No. Just kidding. But really, where the HELL was all this money going???

When asked if he knew ABC, he said he might have met her at a Chamber of Commerce meeting but couldn’t recall and it was quite possible he had not met her. When asked if he had met Toni McHugh, his answer was that he had ‘no recollection’ of meeting her. It became the standard answer to the final prosecution question for each of the 4 witnesses…

“Did you know or have you met Toni McHugh”………………….“Ummmm, I don’t recall meeting her; I’m sure I did but I just can’t recall; Maybe once in the office but I don’t really recall her…”

“Did you know that GBC and TMcH were ‘involved’”… (long pause) “Ummmm…Not until after…. (voice trails off)… after G was arrested”

Is anyone else sensing the BS factor? Or the ‘rehearsed’ factor?

BUT I digress….the bottom line here is that at no time in December 2011 or March 2012 (during Flegg’s busy campaign) did he relinquish any money to GBC. And that, ladies and gentleman, makes him the smartest witness out of the first 4 on the list for today.

AND NOW I NEED TO GO TO BED BECAUSE I NEED TO BE UP FOR COURT IN 5 AND A HALF HOURS. WILL POST MORE TOMORROW NIGHT OR WORK ON THE BLOG DURING BREAKS IN TRIAL TOMORROW… WATCH THIS SPACE :)

PS. THE TITLE OF THIS BLOG WILL MAKE A LOT MORE SENSE AFTER I FINISH THE BLOG TOMORROW….

Just A Few Notes From Court Today….


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This is why it’s taking me so long to get this post to you guys…. Prolific note-taking aside, I’m trying to do a thorough job for everyone who can’t make it to court so if you have specific questions you’d like me to answer, pop them in the comments section and I’ll respond in my post. And what I don’t know (or bugger up), Gerryrocks can fix :P

Was a pleasure meeting him today and I’ll be there bright and early tomorrow… Now that I’ve been ‘deflowered’ by my first day in court ;-)

Carlton terminates contract of Josh Bootsma for explicit pics


When are these young smart ass footballers/sportmen going to realise the are not in grade 3 playing silly games. That stupid behaviour has consequences? Sending naked selfies to a teenage girl??? Bad, sending them when your partner is just about to have your baby, worse, loosing a lucrative AFL career over it? Stupidest decision of your life, possible charges being laid.

It has happened before, they are educated about it and this fool ignores all that for a little boost to the ego…Not to mention embarrass everyone in your life.

Remember those naked photo idiots at St.Kilda football club? click on this link

or here

http://aussiecriminals.com.au/2010/12/21/st-kilda-photo-scandal-the-plot-thickens/

 

Josh Bootsma

Josh Bootsma

EXPLICIT images sent by Carlton defender Josh Bootsma to a teenage girl led to his sacking yesterday.

Carlton acted after the mother of the girl provided the club with photos that Bootsma, 21, had sent.

The Blues terminated Bootsma’s contract after discussions with his manager and the AFL Players’ Association.

Are these the pics? I’m sure there are more

Carlton terminates contract of Josh Bootsma after code of conduct breaches

Carlton terminates contract of Josh Bootsma after code of conduct breaches

The images were sent via social media app Snapchat.

The club was contacted about the pictures on Monday.

Carlton football operations manager Andrew McKay said Bootsma had lost the players’ trust after a series of indiscretions in the past year.

Bootsma was contracted for next year and the Blues will meet his management today, but the gangly defender is not expected to be paid out.

“He continues to not uphold the standards we require,” McKay said.

“If (captain) Marc Murphy had behaved in the same way, then he would be facing the same situation.

“Management made the ­decision. We acted quite ­swiftly. We needed to. I think it was above a decision of the leadership group. He was endeavouring to gain (trust) back over the last few months, but this final act has obviously not enabled him to do that.”

Carlton terminates contract of Josh Bootsma after posting disgusting crap like this to a teenage girl

Carlton terminates contract of Josh Bootsma after posting disgusting crap like this to a teenage girl

NICK RIEWOLDT CALLS FOR TOUGHER SOCIAL MEDIA PENALTIES

McKay said Bootsma previously failed to arrive to training and appointments on time.

He said the seriousness of Bootsma’s contract breach meant the Blues did not consult Murphy or the leadership group.

Bootsma’s partner is ­expecting a baby today.

The Blues are counselling and offering support to the player.

Sacked Carlton player Josh Bootsma sent explicit texts after social media hook-up

Sacked Carlton footballer Josh Bootsma.

Sacked Carlton footballer Josh Bootsma

In a five-month trail of messages on social media forums including Facebook, Instagram, Kik and Snapchat, Bootsma appears to groom at least one Carlton fan before blatantly asking for sexual favours.

“I think you are a sexy girl who deserves to be treated like a princess,’’ one of the expectant father’s messages read.

Then later: “Are you up for a sex session on Tuesday?’’

One image viewed by the Herald Sun appears to show Bootsma pictured in the bath from the waist down – “Join me’’ he says.

In another: “Sounds good. Send dirty snaps.’’

Bootsma sent lurid text messages to Blues supporters requesting sexual favours.

Bootsma sent lurid text messages to Blues supporters requesting sexual favours. 

The 23-year-old woman, who asked not to be named, admitted she was an obsessed Blues supporter who started following Carlton players on Instagram but was surprised when Bootsma sent her a friend request on Facebook.

She said the pair met in person at an open training day last year and, while Bootsma seemed embarrassed, he started sending her Kik messages the next day.

“At the start he was sweet and trying to woo me but I’m not stupid,” she said.

“I caught on pretty quickly what he was about.’’

AFL 360 on Carlton sacking Josh Bootsma 6:26

The aspiring makeup artist said the pair’s communication started in August but broke down by November when Bootsma’s girlfriend became aware of the online chat.

Carlton was forced to dump the young player after the mother of another girl – a teenager – provided the club with photos the defender had been sending.

Adults who send sexually explicit messages to anyone aged 16 or under can face criminal charges.

Cyber safety expert Susan McLean said it was time AFL clubs took a tougher stance.

She said Kik messaging had become the number one app for sex predators worldwide.

Bootsma did not respond to inquiries from the Herald Sun.

aaron.langmaid@news.com.au

 

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