Abdul Numan Haider shot dead by anti-terrorist officers


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No wonder the authorities are asking for calm after the shooting death of a Abdul Numan Haider. I must say that it may make any other young impressionable people being drawn into the filth that is called ISIS and their so-called goals to THINK AGAIN.

Police have every right to defend themselves and ask questions later. Think about what would have happened if this bloke walking into a doctors, or school, or office? It is NOT ON

Officials name Abdul Numan Haider as man shot dead by anti-terrorist officers

Wed 24 Sep 2014, 2:17p

Senior law enforcement officials have named the 18-year-old man who was shot dead after stabbing two officers from the Joint Counter Terrorism team outside a Melbourne police station last night.

Abdul Numan Haider was the “person of interest” who was expected to attend an interview at the Endeavour Hills Police Station when the incident occurred, senior law enforcement sources confirmed.

Victoria Police Chief Commissioner Ken Lay said Haider, who was under investigation and had his passport cancelled, was allegedly seen last week with an Islamic State flag.

“There’s certainly information that he was present at the shopping centre in the last week or so with the flag that appeared to be an ISIS flag,” Chief Commissioner Lay said.

“It’s not an offence but clearly it drew our attention to this person and we had a conversation with this person.”

Haider, whose family are from Afghanistan, had also been associated with the radical Islamic group called Al-Furqan.

It is understood he had recently moved away from the group.

Based in Springvale, in Melbourne’s south-east, associates of Al-Furqan were the targets of terrorism raids by Victoria Police and the Australian Federal Police in 2012.

Chief Commissioner Lay said Haider attacked a police officer who tried to shake his hand outside the station, and then stabbed another officer, about 7:40pm (AEST) on Tuesday.

“When our police members have approached this young man, one’s extended his hand to shake his hand and the response has been he’s been stabbed in the arm,” he said.

“The attacker’s then turned on the second police member and stabbed him three or four times in the body and in the head.

“The first wounded member has then shot and killed the young man.”

One of the injured officers is from the Australian Federal Police (AFP) and the other is a Victoria Police member, they were both rushed to hospital.

Chief Commissioner Lay said both police officers required surgery.

The ABC has been told that Haider had made threats against the Prime Minister, however AFP Acting Commissioner Andrew Colvin said no specific threats were made.

“This is early stages of an investigation … What I will say is and what I can be very confident on is there were no specific threats made,” he said.

Haider’s car is parked at a childcare centre next to the police station and the area is locked down.

Natalie Morales, who works at the childcare centre, said staff were unable to contact parents this morning to tell them the facility was closed, because the contact lists were in the building.

“That can happen anywhere around Australia, unfortunately it happened next door to the childcare I work at,” Ms Morales said.

“Even if it happened during the day, we have a pin code that only the staff and families know, so no-one can access the centre even if we had children in the centre.”

Abbott speaks to family of injured officers

Speaking in Hawaii while en route to a UN Security Council meeting in New York, Prime Minister Tony Abbott said the Melbourne incident was “nasty” and showed the threat from extremists was real.

“Obviously, this indicates that there are people in our community who are capable of very extreme acts,” he said.

“It also indicates that the police will be constantly vigilant to protect us against people who would do us harm.”

Mr Abbott said he had spoken to the wives of both police officers involved.

Chief Commissioner Lay said the stab wounds to the police officers were significant and required surgery, but that both officers were in a stable condition this morning.

“Our AFP colleague underwent surgery overnight for some significant injuries, he’s come through that surgery it appears pretty well, he’s in a serious but stable condition,” Chief Commissioner Lay said.

“Our Victorian Police member has had quite a significant stab wound to his arm, I understand he’ll undergo surgery today to repair some ligament and nerve damage.

“So the physical injuries will heal quick enough and obviously we need to think about the psychological stuff and give these people as much support as we possibly can.”

Victorian Premier urges community to unite

Victorian Premier Denis Napthine said it was important that the incident did not divide the community.

“Let me make it very, very clear, one of the greatest strengths, one of the greatest assets we have here in Victoria is our harmonious, diverse, multi cultural, multi-faith community,” Dr Napthine said.

“We need to preserve and protect that. We need to enhance and build on that.

“We shouldn’t let a single incident divide that. We need to show each other respect, be tolerant and remain united.”

He said authorities were working together to ensure the safety of the community.

“It is imperative that we do all that we can to reassure all members of the Victorian community that everything is being done to protect our safety and making sure that our community continues to work together as a whole Victorian community,” Dr Napthine said.

Islamic leaders criticise police investigation

Leaders of Melbourne’s Islamic community have criticised police over their investigation into the fatal shooting.

Gaith Krayem from the Islamic Council of Victoria said police were quick to jump to conclusions.

“I was disappointed with the immediate press conference police held last night. It was held three hours after the event, and they drew conclusions immediately,” Mr Krayem said.

“There needs to be a proper process as there always should be when police are involved in a fatality.”

What we do know is that there’s an 18-year-old young man who is dead this morning, there are two police officers in hospital, there is a family who is grieving.

Gaith Krayem

Mr Krayen said the public needed to reserve their judgement until a full and objective investigation has taken place.

“Immediately, individuals such as this unfortunately are given these labels of a radical, or a terrorist, or an extremist,” he said.

“Unfortunately, because of the environment we’re in, as soon as you label somebody like that, people don’t want to then question what occurred.

“We don’t know really what happened when this young man arrived at the police station.

“What we do know is that there’s an 18-year-old young man who is dead this morning, there are two police officers in hospital, there is a family who is grieving.”

Blanket suppression order on corruption case biggest in History


WikiLeaks court document: Website publishes details of suppression order granted in June

Julian Assange has been holed up in Ecuador's embassy in London since June, 2012.

Photo: Julian Assange has been holed up in Ecuador’s embassy in London since June, 2012. (AFP: Carl Court)

The WikiLeaks website has published details of a suppression order granted last month ordering Australian media not to publish any details of a case.

The order prevents publication of any information about the case, including the names of some international figures and some of their relatives.

Fairfax quotes WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange defending the publication of the secret order despite the legal implications.

Mr Assange has told Fairfax it is completely egregious to block the public’s right to know and suppress the media, especially in cases of international corruption involving politicians and subsidiaries of a public organisation.

He says WikiLeaks will work to protect Australians’ right to know even when the Government tries to block it.

Mr Assange has been holed up in Ecuador’s London embassy for more than two years, after fleeing there in June 2012 to avoid extradition to Sweden to face questioning over sexual assault allegations, which he denies.

He believes the allegations are politically motivated and linked to WikiLeaks’ release of thousands of classified US documents.

Mr Assange has not been formally charged with any offences, but Britain has made it clear he will be arrested if he tries to leave the embassy.

He says WikiLeaks does not support one group or political party but rather supports those who act in an open and transparent manner.


 

Australia bans reporting of multi-nation corruption case involving Malaysia, Indonesia and Vietnam

Today, 29 July 2014, WikiLeaks releases an unprecedented Australian censorship order concerning a multi-million dollar corruption case explicitly naming the current and past heads of state of Indonesia, Malaysia and Vietnam, their relatives and other senior officials.

The super-injunction invokes “national security” grounds to prevent reporting about the case, by anyone, in order to “prevent damage to Australia’s international relations”. The court-issued gag order follows the secret 19 June 2014 indictment of seven senior executives from subsidiaries of Australia’s central bank, the Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA).

The case concerns allegations of multi-million dollar inducements made by agents of the RBA subsidiaries Securency and Note Printing Australia in order to secure contracts for the supply of Australian-style polymer bank notes to the governments of Malaysia, Indonesia, Vietnam and other countries.

The suppression order lists 17 individuals, including “any current or former Prime Minister of Malaysia”, “Truong Tan San, currently President of Vietnam”, Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono (also known as SBY), currently President of Indonesia (since 2004)”, “Megawati Sukarnoputri (also known as Mega), a former President of Indonesia (2001–2004) and current leader of the PDI-P political party” and 14 other senior officials and relatives from those countries, who specifically may not be named in connection with the corruption investigation.

The document also specifically bans the publication of the order itself as well as an affidavit affirmed last month by Australia’s representative to ASEAN Gillian Bird, who has just been appointed as Australia’s Permanent Representative to the United Nations.

The gag order effectively blacks out the largest high-level corruption case in Australia and the region.

The last known blanket suppression order of this nature was granted in 1995 and concerned the joint US-Australian intelligence spying operation against the Chinese Embassy in Canberra.

WikiLeaks’ publisher Julian Assange said about the order:

“With this order, the worst in living memory, the Australian government is not just gagging the Australian press, it is blindfolding the Australian public. This is not simply a question of the Australian government failing to give this international corruption case the public scrutiny it is due. Foreign Minister Julie Bishop must explain why she is threatening every Australian with imprisonment in an attempt to cover up an embarrassing corruption scandal involving the Australian government.”

“The concept of ‘national security’ is not meant to serve as a blanket phrase to cover up serious corruption allegations involving government officials, in Australia or elsewhere. It is in the public interest for the press to be able to report on this case, which concerns the subsidiaries of the Australian central bank. Who is brokering our deals, and how are we brokering them as a nation? Corruption investigations and secret gag orders for ‘national security’ reasons are strange bedfellows. It is ironic that it took Tony Abbott to bring the worst of ‘Asian Values’ to Australia.”

Read the Australia-wide censorship order for corruption case involving Malaysia, Indonesia and Vietnam.

AFP get another 135 kg of ICE worth $130m off our streets


Follow the money and the drugs will follow. The minnows they caught with the drugs are disposable, with a queue of guys ready to take their places.

That is a lot of money to the man on the street to lose, but if you haven’t seen the brilliant show called “breaking bad”. The drugs they lost are are a mere few batches away for the big players. Not much else the Australian Federal Police can do.

from the ABC Thu 31 Jul 2014, 9:36am

A joint AFP-ACC raid in Melbourne has netted 135 kilograms of methamphetamine.

A joint AFP-ACC raid in Melbourne has netted 135 kilograms of methamphetamine. (ABC News: Tony Nicholls)

The Australian Federal Police (AFP) have seized 135 kilograms of methamphetamine with a street value of $130 million from a Melbourne apartment.

Police said they located four suitcases containing the drugs in an inner city Melbourne apartment on Tuesday night.

The drugs represent 1.3 million street deals, police said.

The AFP and Australian Crime Commission (ACC) executed search warrants in Melbourne yesterday and arrested four Taiwanese nationals, all aged in their twenties.

Eligo Taskforce since 2012:

  • Aprox $40 million in cash seized
  • Over $800 million of illicit drugs seized
  • $30 million in assets restrained
  • Identified more than 179 targets previously unknown to law enforcement officials
  • Disrupted 25 serious organised crime groups
  • Shut down 18 clandestine drug labs, three of which were commercial scale
  • Raised $12 million in tax assessments with 150 referrals to the ATO for further action on evasion and money laundering.

The seizure and arrests comes after intelligence from the Eligo National Task Force.

AFP Commander Bruce Giles said it was a significant seizure for the country and the state.

“Ice, we see as one of the most dangerous and insidious diseases in our communities and the fact that we have removed over 1.3 million street deals of methamphetamine has got to be good for the Victorian and Australian community,” he said.

“I think in terms of an organised crime syndicate operating in Australia, clearly they will see yet again that agencies cooperate effectively together to join forces to combat the drug trade.”

The four men, Chun Lan, 28, Ming Hsuan Ou and Li Ping Chen, both 23, and Shu Yi Lin, 20, appeared briefly in the Melbourne Magistrates Court just before 1:00pm (AEST).

They were all charged with possessing and trafficking a commercial quantity of a border-controlled drug. The charges carry a maximum penalty of life in prison.

The 135kg of crystal methylamphetamine, or ice, worth about $130 million

The 135kg of crystal methylamphetamine, or ice, worth about $130 million

The court heard the men, who were assisted by a translator, have Australian tourist visas and their arrest yesterday is their first time in custody.

They have been remanded in custody until their next court hearing. Magistrate Jelena Popovic told the men they could apply for bail at any time.

They will return to court on November 5 for a committal mention.


A Melbourne ice haul of 135kg packed into suitcases has been uncovered after authorities tracked profits of a crime syndicate.

Authorities tracking money linked to offshore crime syndicates have seized $130 million worth of ice packed into plastic bags and stacked in four bulging suitcases in a Melbourne apartment.

Four Taiwanese nationals in Australia on tourist visas have been charged over the crystal methylamphetamine haul.

More than 135kg of the drug was seized, an amount which police say would have been on-sold to users 1.3 million times over.

A joint Australian Federal Police and Australian Crime Commission (ACC) operation netted the illicit product, after intelligence was provided through the Eligo national task force which tracks money laundering.

ACC national manager of investigations Richard Grant said people were increasingly being targeted by cartels and offshore syndicates, focused purely on profit.

“One of the things for the Eligo task force is going after the profits and this is how we were able to track these particular syndicate members to end up with these seizures,” he told reporters on Wednesday.

AFP commander Bruce Giles said the bust was significant and investigations into the exact source of the drugs were ongoing.

“Traditionally with this quantity of ice, you would expect it to come by land or sea,” he said.

The drugs were found in four suitcases in an inner-city Melbourne apartment on Tuesday afternoon.

Four men have been charged with a range of drug offences.

A brief hearing in the Melbourne Magistrates Court on Wednesday was told the men were in Australia on tourist visas and have no fixed address within the country.

Shu Yi Lin, 20, and Li Ping Chen, 23, were both charged with possessing a commercial quantity of ice suspected of being illegally imported.

Chun Lan, 28, and Ming Hsuan Ou, 23, were each charged with trafficking a commercial quantity of ice.

Two men arrested over insider trading, abuse of public office


Silly young blokes. university educated, obviously smart (and greedy) but have ruined their lives taking on the system. Tough luck boys.7 million dollars down the drain with your careers!

Insider trading sting: Australian Bureau of Statistics employee Christopher Russell Hill to be extradited over alleged $7m scam

Updated 2 hours 28 minutes ago

Photo: Christopher Hill is escorted by police at Canberra Airport. 

A 24-year-old Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) employee will be extradited to Victoria to face charges over an alleged $7 million insider trading scam.

Christopher Russell Hill made a brief appearance in the ACT Magistrates Court this morning, where he was refused bail.

The statistician is accused of sharing unpublished ABS data with friend Lukas Kamay, an NAB employee in Melbourne, to predict movements in the Australian dollar.

The charges laid by ASIC and the Australian Federal Police (AFP) include insider trading, money laundering and abuse of public office.

Authorities allege Kamay pocketed the majority of the $7 million windfall, while Hill allegedly made $60,000.

The court heard that Hill wrote the ABS data on a notepad to avoid electronic detection systems.

He is alleged to have shared the information with Kamay via phones the pair had bought under false names.

Authorities say they began investigating after being alerted to “suspicious activity” on the foreign exchange market between August last year and May this year.

Kamay faced the Melbourne Magistrates Court yesterday afternoon on seven charges and was released on bail.

However, Magistrate Bernadette Boss refused Hill’s application for bail on Saturday, accepting prosecution arguments that he may be tempted to abscond.

Photo: Former NAB employee Lukas Kamay after he was charged over insider trading yesterday.

The court also heard Hill lives with another ABS employee. Magistrate Boss agreed with prosecutors that there was a likelihood the defendant may attempt to interfere with evidence.

The prosecution said they have a strong case against Hill, who is likely to spend time in jail if convicted.

The court heard three of the four charges against Hill attract a penalty of up to 10 years’ jail, while the fourth attracts a prison term of up to five years.

He has been with the ABS for about three years.

Charges come after AFP raids homes

The AFP obtained eight warrants to search the NAB in Melbourne and the ABS in Canberra, as well as private homes in both cities.

They seized a property, a motor vehicle and funds totalling about $7 million.

Police also allege they found $9,950 cash hidden in a wardrobe at Hill’s Belconnen property.

The NAB says it has terminated Kamay’s employment while the ABS has suspended Hill, whom it describes as “a relatively junior officer with trusted access” to information.

The two men attended Melbourne’s Monash University together and police say it was during that time they struck up a friendship.

In an internal memo obtained by the ABC, the ABS told staff it is the first time ever that a staff member has been arrested for leaking data.

“Even though this is the first time in our history of more than 100 years that a staff member has been arrested for leaking statistics, it has the potential to tarnish our reputation as a trusted custodian of sensitive data,” the memo said.

“We will undertake a thorough review to learn what we can from this incident. Fortunately, the police believe that no other ABS staff were involved.”

The Australian Shareholders Association says investors should have confidence in the financial regulatory system.

Spokesman Stephen Mayne told AM the allegations are startling but there are strong signs the system is working.

“It’s reassuring, if you believe the press reports, that the broker involved referred the trades to the authorities and the alleged crimes have been detected,” he said.

“But it’s certainly stunning in terms of the level of detail of the allegations being made by federal police and ASIC.”

ASIC will not specify how it became aware of the transactions, but says there are a range of ways it can be alerted to insider trading, including complaints, tip-offs and surveillance.

The men have been arrested by the Australian Federal Police (AFP) for offences relating to insider trading after police seized $7 million in alleged proceeds of crime.

They were arrested under a joint major operation by the AFP and the Australian Securities and Investments Commission (ASIC) into suspicious trading in the foreign exchange derivatives market.

Insider trading sting: $7m in assets seized as NAB employee, Bureau of Statistics officer arrested over currency deals

Two men in their twenties who worked at the Australian Bureau of Statistics and the National Australia Bank have been charged with insider trading on foreign currency markets.

Former NAB employee Lukas Kamay has been charged over insider trading.

Former NAB employee Lukas Kamay has been charged over insider trading.

The Australian Federal Police (AFP) alleges 26-year-old former NAB employee Lukas Kamay, based in Melbourne, used unpublished unemployment, retail and trade data obtained through the ABS officer to trade in foreign exchange derivatives.

Police allege Mr Kamay paid friend Christopher Russell Hill between $50,000 and $60,000 to persuade him to provide information related to confidential statistics held by the ABS.

“In effect, he utilised sensitive ABS information to predict the fluctuations in the Australian dollar,” AFP spokesman Ian McCartney said.

The two men attended university together and police say it was during that time they struck up a friendship.

Authorities will allege Kamay pocketed the majority of the $7 million windfall and will not specify how the pair communicated, although they say it was “regular” but “varied”.

Authorities say they began investigating after being alerted to “suspicious activity” on the foreign exchange market between August last year and May this year.

ASIC will not specify how it became aware of the transactions, but says there are a range of ways it can be alerted to insider trading, including complaints, tip-offs and surveillance.

The AFP obtained eight warrants to search the NAB in Melbourne and the ABS in Canberra as well as private homes in both cities.

They seized a property, a motor vehicle and funds totalling around $7 million earlier today.

Kamay appeared in Melbourne Magistrates Court today charged with insider trading, corruption of a public official, and money laundering.

Police say he was operating independently of his employer and did not use any of the bank’s systems to carry out his alleged crimes. He has since been sacked from his job with the bank.

The 24-year-old ABS employee will be charged with insider trading, receiving a corrupt benefit, release of sensitive information and abuse of public office.

“This has been a complex investigation” Mr McCartney said.

Chris Savundra from the corporate regulator ASIC says the Australian dollar is one of the most actively traded currencies on the global foreign exchange market.

“The alleged conduct has the potential to undermine confidence in the integrity of the foreign exchange market and disadvantage those that participate in the market without that inside information,” he said.

The AFP says both the NAB and ABS co-operated with their investigation.