GERARD BADEN-CLAY Hearing 3rd Feb 2014-UPDATED


04/02/14 UPDATE FOR DAY 2

ALLISON Baden-Clay went to see a family counsellor about her husband’s three-year affair with a staff member, a court has been told today.

Gerard Baden-Clay, charged with the Murder of his wife Allison Baden-Clay

Gerard Baden-Clay, charged with the Murder of his wife Allison Baden-Clay

The Brookfield mum also detailed her history of depression to the counsellor, the court was told at a pre-trial hearing.

The routine hearing is to resolve legal issues ahead of the Gerard Baden-Clay’s upcoming murder trial in the Brisbane Supreme Court.

Allison told the counsellor her husband Gerard’s attitude to the depression was that he was “over it” and that it had contributed to the affair, the court was told.

The court heard the counsellor later had a separate session with Gerard where he said he wanted to leave the affair in the past but reluctantly agreed to 15-minute discussions with his wife every second night.

Baden-Clay reported his wife missing on April 20, 2012. He has been charged with her murder and is due to face trial in June.

Relationships Australia counsellor Carmel Ritchie told the court the first session with Allison was at Spring Hill on March 27, 2012, and lasted about an hour.

Allison described herself as a mother of three who worked with her husband’s real estate agency four days a week, Ms Ritchie told the court.

She told the counsellor that after taking malaria medication on her honeymoon she had a “very severe reaction” and suffered chronic depression and “psychotic episodes”.

She had seen a psychologist during her second pregnancy and had been on and off medication ever since.

Allison said her husband had an affair for three years and at least partly blamed her depression, Ms Richie said.

Asked to describe her problems in a few words she told the counsellor: “Inadequate. Not good enough. Believe I let it happen. Gerard’s way is the right way. Gerard had an affair for the last three years. Parenting, Gerard criticises me. Fear that one day he will leave me”.

Allison told the counsellor she wanted to “work on me” and sort out issues with parenting, the court was told.

Allison found out about Gerard’s affair on September 14, 2011, Ms Ritchie said.

The affair started on August 27, 2008, four days after Gerard and Allison’s own anniversary, the counsellor said.

Ms Ritchie said Allison told her: “I confronted him. He is now honest and takes responsibility. He blames me for some of it, the depression.”

Allison said that two years ago on their anniversary she surprised Gerard by asking: “What’s wrong with us?”

She told the counsellor Gerard replied: “I’ve had enough. I want to leave.”

Allison said she put it down to a midlife crisis.

Allison said Gerard’s personality was “ambitious and leader like” and he had high expectations of her and the children, Ms Richie told the court.

She told the counsellor her father felt as though “he was controlling her”, the court was told.

In her case notes, the counsellor wrote her opinion that Allison was a “conflict avoider who has said yes too many times in the relationship”.

To Gerard, Allison was not the girl he married, while Gerard had changed to a “look after myself” attitude, the court was told.

Ms Ritchie said she told Allison at the end of the session she could bring Gerard to the next session if she wanted.

Allison said she did not believe Gerard would want to come.

However at the next appointment on April 16, 2012, both Allison and Gerard were in the waiting room.

Ms Ritchie told the court she took Gerard into her room on his own at first. She said she had planned to spend half the hour-long session with him and then see them both together, but the session with Gerard went for most of the hour.

“I was surprised to see Gerard there as well. That was because Allison thought he would not come,” Ms Ritchie told the court.

The session, at Kenmore, was four days before Baden-Clay reported his wife missing.

Ms Ritchie said she took a standard 60-second snapshot with Gerard, but he didn’t say much about himself personally, talking instead about his work and achievements.

The court heard that after further questions Gerard told the counsellor: “Allison does not trust me. She questions me. She says yes when she means no.”

He told the counsellor of Allison’s disappointment with her life and that he used to blame his wife for disappointments in his own life, the court was told.

He said he attended the session because Allison wanted him to.

He wanted to “build a future” with his wife and to leave the affair behind him and thought discussing the affair with Allison was a regression, Ms Ritchie told the court.

“He wants to get on with life. Wipe it clean,” the counsellor said she wrote in her notes from the session.

“He needs to accept seven or eight months is very early days yet and to ‘steel’ himself for the long haul.”

Ms Ritchie told the court she advised Baden-Clay he could not ignore his wife’s feelings about the affair.

“I spoke about the fact he did have to sit and listen to Allison’s feelings about the affair.

“I told him that he can’t put this in the past because for Allison that past is very much in the present.”

Gerard did not want to take the advice.

“Isn’t that regression? Isn’t that living in the past?” he asked.

They went back and forth until “eventually he agreed”.

Ms Ritchie said she told Gerard to listen to Allison for 10 to 15 minutes every second night. She said she “always” limited such talks because they were “highly emotional”.

Gerard’s role was to “simply listen … absolutely not be defensive” and at the end to express remorse if that was how he felt.

Ms Ritchie told the court she went outside to get Allison from the waiting room and apologised for taking so long with her husband.

“Her face broke into a smile and she said ‘I’m over the moon you have spent this time with him’.”

Ms Ritchie said when she was back in the room with both Baden-Clay and his wife she went over the plan for the 10 to 15-minute talks, which were to continue until the next session in a week or two.

“I saw her say to Gerard ‘I am over the moon that you have spent this time’. But it was a defensive, hurt way that she was saying it.”

Asked in court about Allison’s mood, she said: “I think she was very pleased to introduce me to Gerard. She was smiling.”

Ms Ritchie added that Gerard discussed his roles in the school P&C and the local chamber of commerce.

“For Gerard, his image in the community is very important…He believes he is a valuable member of society,” the counsellor said she wrote in her notes.

The next session was never booked, with Baden-Clay reporting his wife missing on the Friday of that week.

Barrister Michael Byrne QC, for Baden-Clay, put to the witness that Allison’s depression and early panic attacks went back to taking the malaria medication during her honeymoon and to her pregnancy with the couple’s first child, who was born in 2001.

Mr Byrne said between Allison’s discovery of the affair and the first session with the counsellor Baden-Clay had “reached the point where he was honest and was taking responsibility”.

“His attitude to the affair is to wipe it clean and get on with life. What she’s saying to you there was put the past behind them put the affair out of life and move on as a couple,” Mr Byrne said.

Ms Ritchie agreed Allison wanted to move on as a couple.

03/02/14 Not much to report from today’s hearing, day 1 of 2

ACCUSED wife murderer Gerard Baden-Clay returned to court in Brisbane on Monday for legal argument ahead of his upcoming trial.

Scratches on the accused, Gerard Baden-Clay.

Scratches on the accused, Gerard Baden-Clay.

The routine hearing to determine which evidence can be put before a jury is scheduled to run for two days in the Brisbane Supreme Court.

Dressed in a dark suit and wearing a tie, the 43-year-old former real estate agent watched proceedings from the dock.

The court heard from the pathologist who carried out Allison Baden-Clay’s post-mortem examination.

Legal argument centred on the admissibility of parts of his evidence, and that of medical experts who assessed scratches and other marks found on Baden-Clay following his wife’s disappearance.

The couple’s former family counsellor is expected to give evidence in court for the first time when the hearing resumes on Tuesday.

Mrs Baden-Clay, 43, was reported missing by her husband on April 20, 2012.

Her body was found 10 days later on the banks of a creek in Brisbane’s west.

The last court related update is as follows from back in December 2013.

The many GBC posts can be found here or here http://aussiecriminals.com.au/tag/gerard-baden-clay/

A family counsellor can be called to give evidence at the murder trial of Brisbane man Gerard Baden-Clay, a judge has ruled.

The Relationships Australia counsellor had argued her conversations with Baden-Clay, 43, and his slain wife Allison, were confidential.

However, Supreme Court judge James Douglas on Thursday ruled counsellor Carmel Ritchie will be required to give evidence at a pre-trial hearing next year.

The ruling means the crown can call Ms Ritchie as a witness during the trial, which has been set down for June next year.

The counsellor spoke with Mrs Baden-Clay on March 27, 2012, and with Baden-Clay and his wife separately on April 16, 2012.

Baden-Clay sat in the dock during Thursday’s brief hearing.

Mrs Baden-Clay was reported missing on April 20 last year, and her body was found on the banks of a creek in Brisbane’s west 10 days later.

Baden-Clay was arrested in June 2012 and charged with murder.

He maintains he is innocent.

In an earlier court hearing, Relationships Australia’s barrister George Kalimnios had argued the Family Law Act prohibited Ms Ritchie giving evidence, and could claim privilege on the grounds of public interest.

But in his written judgement on Thursday, Justice Douglas said both arguments were misconceived, and there were no grounds to claim privilege.

“Even if such a privilege existed separate from the Act, the balance is decisively in favour of permitting access to the evidence for the purposes of Mr Baden-Clay’s trial on the charge of murder.”

Matters before the Court 3rd Feb 2014

reserved

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Gerard Baden-Clay Committal Hearing Thread Part IV


Kholo Creek Bridge

PLEASE REST IN PEACE ALLISON, WE ARE WITH YOU, WE MISS YOU.

Summary of first 3 days of committal hearing (courtesy of The Courier Mail)

Witnesses testify at committal hearing of Gerard Baden-Clay, charged with murdering wife Allison

Day two: committal hearing of Gerard Baden-Clay over death of wife Allison

Day three: committal hearing of Gerard Baden-Clay over death of wife Allison

____________________________________

Witness Statements/Reports (courtesy of a fellow kind poster who has very generously allowed them to be available to all)

Phillip Geoffrey Broom – former business partner

Jocelyn Anne Frost – former business partner

Associate Professor David Wells – Head, Clinical Forensic Medicine – Victorian Institute of Forensic Medicine

Constable Kieron Ash – first responder

Neil Cameron Robertson – Investigative Computer Analyst - in his element analysing the 100 phones and 50 computers/iPads

Senior Sergeant Narelle Elizabeth Curtis – second responder

Record of Interview – Transcript

000 Call – Transcript

Forensic Procedure Order

Hydrology Report

Autopsy Report

____________________________________

Previous Committal Hearing Post

Gerard Baden-Clay Committal Hearing – 11 March 2013

____________________________________

Baden-Clay’s Sister Speaks (courtesy of 7 News)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rwVR76UPaDQ]

Update 20/03/13 Newly Released images taken the day Gerard Baden Clay reported his wife missing

Gerard Baden-Clay Committal Hearing Thread Part III


Car Positioning

Car Positioning

BC CarportBC Driveway

Summary of first 3 days of committal hearing (courtesy of The Courier Mail)

Witnesses testify at committal hearing of Gerard Baden-Clay, charged with murdering wife Allison

Day two: committal hearing of Gerard Baden-Clay over death of wife Allison

Day three: committal hearing of Gerard Baden-Clay over death of wife Allison

____________________________________

Witness Statements/Reports (courtesy of a fellow kind poster who has very generously allowed them to be available to all)

Phillip Geoffrey Broom – former business partner

Jocelyn Anne Frost – former business partner

Associate Professor David Wells – Head, Clinical Forensic Medicine – Victorian Institute of Forensic Medicine

Constable Kieron Ash – first responder

Neil Cameron Robertson – Investigative Computer Analyst - in his element analysing the 100 phones and 50 computers/iPads

Senior Sergeant Narelle Elizabeth Curtis – second responder

Record of Interview – Transcript

000 Call – Transcript

Forensic Procedure Order

Hydrology Report

Autopsy Report

____________________________________

Previous Committal Hearing Post

Gerard Baden-Clay Committal Hearing – 11 March 2013

____________________________________

Baden-Clay’s Sister Speaks (courtesy of 7 News)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rwVR76UPaDQ]

Update 20/03/13 Newly Released images taken the day Gerard Baden Clay reported his wife missing

Picture of  injuries police found on Gerard Baden-Clay on the day he reported his wife Allison missing. Image of injuries police found on Gerard Baden-Clay on the day he reported his wife Allison missing. injuries police found on Gerard Baden-Clay on the day he reported his wife Allison missing. COURT-Photograph of injuries police found on Gerard Baden-Clay's chest on the day he reported his wife Allison missing. Photograph of injuries police found on Gerard Baden-Clay's face on the day he reported his wife Allison missingGBC injuries

Gerard Baden-Clay Committal Hearing Thread Part II


The committal hearing of Gerard Baden-Clay has now adjourned after hearing evidence over the past three days and will resume again on Monday, 18 March 2013 for a further 3 days.

Summary of first 3 days of committal hearing (courtesy of The Courier Mail)

Witnesses testify at committal hearing of Gerard Baden-Clay, charged with murdering wife Allison

Day two: committal hearing of Gerard Baden-Clay over death of wife Allison

Day three: committal hearing of Gerard Baden-Clay over death of wife Allison

____________________________________

Witness Statements/Reports (courtesy of a fellow kind poster who has very generously allowed them to be available to all)

Phillip Geoffrey Broom – former business partner

Jocelyn Anne Frost – former business partner

Associate Professor David Wells – Head, Clinical Forensic Medicine – Victorian Institute of Forensic Medicine

Constable Kieron Ash – first responder

Neil Cameron Robertson – Investigative Computer Analyst - in his element analysing the 100 phones and 50 computers/iPads

Senior Sergeant Narelle Elizabeth Curtis – second responder

Record of Interview – Transcript

000 Call – Transcript

Forensic Procedure Order

Hydrology Report

Autopsy Report

____________________________________

Previous Committal Hearing Post

Gerard Baden-Clay Committal Hearing – 11 March 2013

____________________________________

Baden-Clay’s Sister Speaks (courtesy of 7 News)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rwVR76UPaDQ]

Update 20/03/13 Newly Released images taken the day Gerard Baden Clay reported his wife missing

Picture of  injuries police found on Gerard Baden-Clay on the day he reported his wife Allison missing. Image of injuries police found on Gerard Baden-Clay on the day he reported his wife Allison missing. injuries police found on Gerard Baden-Clay on the day he reported his wife Allison missing. COURT-Photograph of injuries police found on Gerard Baden-Clay's chest on the day he reported his wife Allison missing. Photograph of injuries police found on Gerard Baden-Clay's face on the day he reported his wife Allison missingGBC injuries

Gerard Baden-Clay Committal Hearing – 18 March 2013


The committal hearing of Gerard Baden-Clay has now adjourned after hearing evidence over the past three days and will resume again on Monday, 18 March 2013 for a further 3 days.

Summary of first 3 days of committal hearing (courtesy of The Courier Mail)

Witnesses testify at committal hearing of Gerard Baden-Clay, charged with murdering wife Allison

Day two: committal hearing of Gerard Baden-Clay over death of wife Allison

Day three: committal hearing of Gerard Baden-Clay over death of wife Allison

____________________________________

Witness Statements/Reports (courtesy of a fellow kind poster who has very generously allowed them to be available to all)

Phillip Geoffrey Broom - former business partner

Jocelyn Anne Frost - former business partner

Associate Professor David Wells - Head, Clinical Forensic Medicine – Victorian Institute of Forensic Medicine

Constable Kieron Ash - first responder

Neil Cameron Robertson – Investigative Computer Analyst - in his element analysing the 100 phones and 50 computers/iPads

Senior Sergeant Narelle Elizabeth Curtis - second responder

Record of Interview – Transcript 

000 Call – Transcript

Forensic Procedure Order

Hydrology Report

Autopsy Report

____________________________________

Previous Committal Hearing Post

Gerard Baden-Clay Committal Hearing – 11 March 2013

____________________________________

Baden-Clay’s Sister Speaks (courtesy of 7 News)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rwVR76UPaDQ]

Update 20/03/13 Newly Released images taken the day Gerard Baden Clay reported his wife missing

Picture of  injuries police found on Gerard Baden-Clay on the day he reported his wife Allison missing. Image of injuries police found on Gerard Baden-Clay on the day he reported his wife Allison missing. injuries police found on Gerard Baden-Clay on the day he reported his wife Allison missing. COURT-Photograph of injuries police found on Gerard Baden-Clay's chest on the day he reported his wife Allison missing. Photograph of injuries police found on Gerard Baden-Clay's face on the day he reported his wife Allison missingGBC injuries

UPDATE-Gerard Baden-Clay will return to court on September 3 2012


Previous threads can be found using the links below, One being very first and so on…

One (26/04/12) here Two (14/05/12)  here Three (17/05/12) here Four (20/05/2012) here Five  (23/05/12) here Six (26/05/12) here Seven (28/05/12) here Eight (30/0512) here Nine (02/06/12) here Ten (08/06/12) here Eleven (11/06/12) here  Twelve 13/06/12 here Thirteen 17/06/12 here Fourteen 20/06/12 here Fifteen 22/06/12 here Sixteen 24/06/12 here Seventeen 26/06/12 here

A MAGISTRATE said he was “flabbergasted” that police would need four to five months to scour Gerard Baden-Clay’s finances – a process set to delay court proceedings.

The Money trail will take months to unravel

Prosecutor Danny Boyle told Magistrate Chris Callaghan they would be unable to give Baden-Clay’s defence team the full brief of evidence because an investigative accountant would need until mid November to analyse bank accounts and insurance policies.

Baden-Clay, 41, who did not appear today, is charged with murdering his wife Allison on April 19 and dumping her body on the banks of a creek.

An earlier court hearing was told Baden-Clay is $1 million in debt and stood to gain about that from his wife’s life insurance and superannuation policies.

Mr Boyle said police were also waiting on computer and phone examinations, as well as post mortem results.

“The post mortem tests are outstanding … the forensics pathologist was away last week and this week until Wednesday,” he said.

A recent court hearing heard police still do not have a cause of death.

Police have so far taken statements from 330 people and still have another 50 to 100 to go.

“The investigative accountant is still to come,” Mr Boyle said.

“The accountant has indicated that it will be mid November.”

Magistrate Callaghan said he was shocked it could take so long.

“You’re joking, aren’t you,” he said.

“I can’t believe for a minute that it’s going to take five months for an accountant to look into the finances of one person.”

Mr Boyle said the records were “voluminous”.

Magistrate Callaghan ordered that the brief of evidence be handed to the defence by no later than August 20, except for the accountant’s statement.

The matter will return to court on September 3 for a committal mention.

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Gerard Baden Clay- The Prisoner-The man…Updates


Previous threads can be found using the links below, One being very first and so on…

One (26/04/12) here Two (14/05/12)  here Three (17/05/12) here Four (20/05/2012) here Five  (23/05/12) here Six (26/05/12) here Seven (28/05/12) here Eight (30/0512) here Nine (02/06/12) here Ten (08/06/12) here Eleven (11/06/12) here  Twelve 13/06/12 here Thirteen 17/06/12 here Fourteen 20/06/12 here Fifteen 22/06/12 here Sixteen 24/06/12 here Seventeen 26/06/12 here

Update June 28, 2012

Gerard Baden-Clay has lost 13 friends on Facebook, including Premier Campbell Newman, since being arrested for murder of wife Allison

UNFRIENDED- A screenshot of Gerard Baden-Clay’s Facebook page.

However, he still has 372 Facebook friends, including federal Liberal MPs Jane Prentice and Julie Bishop.

A spokeswoman for Mr Newman said the Premier’s old Facebook profile, which has not been used since the election campaign ended, was shut down a couple of weeks ago.

“The closure of the profile means Mr Newman no longer has ‘Facebook friends’,” she said in a statement.

“Instead Mr Newman has a Facebook page, which anyone can like, with requests not requiring approval.”

Prisoners cannot access the internet, but many with Facebook accounts get their family or friends to update their profiles.

It’s been two weeks since Baden-Clay was moved to Arthur Gorrie Correctional Centre and he’s yet to be admitted to the typical 3m x 4m cell. He remains in the prison’s medical unit and The Courier-Mail understands he’s had multiple visits from a psychologist.

The only external visitors have been in a two-hour non-contact visit with father Nigel and sister Olivia Walton and about an hour with his lawyer Darren Mahony.

A Queensland Corrective Services spokesman said all prisoners had to be assessed to find out if they were a suicide risk before being imprisoned.

“Prisoner Baden-Clay underwent a medical assessment prior to undergoing an induction,” the spokesman said. “At induction, the prisoner would have been informed about his obligations, rights and entitlements.”

All prisoners are initially placed under observation before entering the mainstream prison system.

Baden-Clay is expected to be given protection status, which is only granted if they are assessed as “at risk of harm within the general prison population”, have an intellectual disability or if charges relate to “serious offences”.

Upon entry, prisoners are issued with prison uniform – a green T-shirt, shorts, tracksuit pants, jumper and joggers.

Baden-Clay is not required to work in prison, but will be encouraged to participate “in some type of meaningful activity”, such as cleaning or kitchen duties, horticulture work or maintenance.

“If a remand prisoner chooses not to work, they must be paid an unemployment allowance – this is $1.30 a week. In addition, a hygiene allowance of $9.55 is payable per week,” a QCS spokesman said.

“If employed, they are paid (depending on the job) from $2.80 to $8.45 per week.”

Baden-Clay reported his wife Allison missing on April 20 and her body was found 10 days later at Kholo Creek in Anstead – 14km away from her Brookfield home.

Update 27/06/12 8.30pm

Police noticed ‘scratches on Baden-Clay’

 

His defence counsel Peter Davis SC told the court during the bail application that these were from caterpillar bites.

When officers showed up to Gerard Baden-Clay’s home after he reported his wife missing, they couldn’t help but notice deep scratches on his face.

The 41-year-old father of three told them he cut himself with an old shaver but police were not convinced and notified a detective, court documents released on Tuesday show.

The marks on his right cheek appeared similar to fingernail scratches, the detective said in his affidavit submitted during Baden-Clay’s failed bail application in the Supreme Court in Brisbane last Friday.

“They are not straight or clean cuts normally made by a sharp razor blade,” the detective said.

A government medical officer also found the injuries were not consistent with a shaving injury but were instead consistent with fingernail marks.

Baden-Clay, a real estate agent, was arrested on June 13 and charged with murdering his wife Allison, 43, and interfering with her corpse.

Her body was found in a creek bed 10 days after he reported her missing from their Brookfield home, west of Brisbane, on April 20.

More scratches were noticed on his torso and neck during an upper body examination, the court documents say.

His defence counsel Peter Davis SC told the court during the bail application that these were from caterpillar bites.

He did not address the scratches seen on his client’s face.

Mr Davis also argued the police case against his client was weak, with no cause of death identified, no weapon found, and nothing to place his client outside his home on the night his wife disappeared.

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Inside the prison where accused wife-killer Gerard Baden-Clay will be held for up to three years

The Sunday Mail (Qld)

THIS is where accused wife-murderer Gerard Baden-Clay will live, possibly for up to three years, as the high-profile case goes through the legal process.

A toilet connected to a sink, a single bed, a mirror, TV, shelf and desk make up a 3m x 4m cell where prisoners spend 12 hours a day inside the Arthur Gorrie Correctional Centre.

A small window overlooks the nondescript, high-security, prison grounds. Locked prison blocks remain under constant surveillance; thick, secure, doors slam loudly; guards walk freely through long, caged walkways; inmates workout with whatever they can find, pumping chairs like dumbbells.

Morning headcount begins at 6.45am, before a cereal and bread breakfast, followed by gym and activities such as football, tennis and volleyball.

Prisoners can smoke outside of their designated common area, watch TV or make a phone call.

The dinner menu over a week includes sausages in a curry sauce, fresh crumbed chicken, braised lamb chops, beef stroganoff and roast lamb, with meals served from 4.30pm.

Prisoners are locked in their cells two hours later.

The Sunday Mail toured the facility last week, entering the compound where 865 prisoners on remand were processed upon arrival. The five-stage process includes an interview, strip-search and shower.

Some are granted protection status if they are assessed as “at risk of harm within the general prison population”, if charges relate to “serious offences”, if they are bikies or if they have intellectual disabilities. They receive new clothes, toiletries and bedding and then wait in a cell. They are photographed, fill out paperwork for an ID and talk a counsellor about their state of mind. Questions cover how they are likely to cope in prison, family and other external supports and what they are looking forward to when they are freed.

Doctors and nurses examine them in the medical centre. Some high-risk, at-risk prisoners stay in the centre, under continuous observation every 15 or 30 minutes, while lower at-risk prisoners stay in cells under camera observation unit in W Block.

On arrival, prisoners spend at least their first night in an induction unit and get a booklet outlining their daily routine.

The booklet also explains employment, protection status, medical requests, dental services, optometrist appointments, chaplaincy services, discharge as well as requests for a special diet.

Prisoners are allowed a total of 10 CDs and cassette tapes, sunglasses, a kettle, photo albums and photos.

They can receive socks and jocks, plastic hairbrush, singlets, court clothes and five magazines and books through the mail without a request form. Personal and legal visits are set down between 9am and 11am or 1.15pm and 3pm.

Prisoners receive an amenities allowance of $9.55 a week.

A Queensland Corrective Services spokesman said that jobs – including cleaning or kitchen duties, horticulture work in gardens or maintenance – pay $2.80-$8.50 a day.

Money from trust accounts can “buy up” items, including cigarettes, chocolate bars, lollies, chips, nuts, biscuits and two-minute noodles.

Gerard Baden-Clay, charged with the Murder of his wife Allison Baden-Clay

DETAILS have emerged in the murder case against Gerard Baden-Clay from affidavits relied on for his Supreme Court bail application.

The affidavits handed to the court for his Friday bail application included details of text messages Baden-Clay allegedly sent to his wife Allison on the morning he reported her missing where he repeatedly asked where she was.

As part of the investigation, Baden-Clay also provided police with an extensive curriculum vitae, revealing his past schooling and work history.

Details are reproduced below:

Gerard Baden-Clay

  • Born September 9, 1970, in Bournemouth, England.
  • He spent his younger years in Rhodesia (Zimbabwe)
  • Married to Allison June Baden-Clay (nee Dickie) on 23 August, 1997
  • His family (father Nigel, mother Elaine, sister Olivia and brother Adam) came to Australia in 1980 when he was 10 years-old after forming the view that it would be “safer to live in Australia”.
  • They initially lived in Melbourne, Victoria, for eight months before settling in Toowoomba in 1981.
  • Gerard completed primary school in Toowoomba at Gabbinbar State School.
  • He then went to Toowoomba Grammar School until 1987, completing year 12.
  • Obtained a tertiary entrance score of 900.
  • While at high school, he worked as a waiter at Squatters (a Toowoomba restaurant) and also undertook strawberry and potato picking in Lockyer Valley.
  • Represented Toowoomba in hockey in under 17 and under 21 divisions.
  • After school, he completed five years in a Bachelor of Business (majoring in accounting and computing) at the now University of Southern Queensland, formerly the Darling Downs Institute of Advanced Education.
  • At the same time, he spent three years with the Australia Army Reserve as a training officer.
  • While studying he supplemented his income chipping onions and picking potatoes in the Lockyer Valley and continuing to work as a waiter at the Squatters restaurant.
  • From 1991-93 he worked as an accountant in the Audit Division of KPMG Peat Marwick. For approximately 12 months, Gerard worked as a company accountant for Designer Workwear.
  • From 1994-97 he worked at Flight Centre, initially as a travel consultant for the first 24-hour division, managing his own outlet. Later, he worked as an office and recruitment systems manager.
  • At Flight Centre he met wife Allison and after marrying, they travelled overseas.
  • In London, he worked as a Financial Systems Consultant with Blockbuster International for six months while Allison worked with Dale Karnegie Training.
  • While overseas, he also worked in the Project Department of Kandersteg International Scouts Centre, Switzerland, as a volunteer for three months. Later, he worked as an assistant director of the International Scouts Centre for 12 months.
  • Gerard returned home with Allison in 1999 and went back to Flight Centre as the Global Systems and Communications Manager until the end of 2000.
  • After that, he worked at Raine & Horne at Kenmore for 10 months.
  • Gerard obtained his real estate agent’s licence during the period from late 2003 to early 2004.
  • He started as Principal and Managing Director of Century 21 Westside in 2004, where he remained until his arrest on June 13.

* Source: Gerard Baden-Clay affidavit dated June 21, 2012

Previous threads can be found using the links below, One being very first and so on…

One (26/04/12) here Two (14/05/12)  here Three (17/05/12) here Four (20/05/2012) here Five  (23/05/12) here Six (26/05/12) here Seven (28/05/12) here Eight (30/0512) here Nine (02/06/12) here Ten (08/06/12) here Eleven (11/06/12) here  Twelve 13/06/12 here Thirteen 17/06/12 here Fourteen 20/06/12 here Fifteen 22/06/12 here Sixteen 24/06/12 here Seventeen 26/06/12 here

Gerard Baden Clay gets Visitors-New Evidence Photos released


The more that is revealed about this case the more one could understand the huge hole Gerard Baden-Clay is in, how on EARTH could anyone explain the mountains of evidence piling up that to me personally, points to a very guilty man, who was planning this, carried it out, and even attempted to cover it up before it all happened. This is riveting stuff, and we are still only getting snippets of the thousands of pages already before the courts…
Previous threads can be found using the links below, One being very first and so on…

One (26/04/12) here Two (14/05/12)  here Three (17/05/12) here Four (20/05/2012) here Five  (23/05/12) here Six (26/05/12) here Seven (28/05/12) here Eight (30/0512) here Nine (02/06/12) here Ten (08/06/12) here Eleven (11/06/12) here  Twelve 13/06/12 here Thirteen 17/06/12 here Fourteen 20/06/12 here Fifteen 22/06/12 here Sixteen 24/06/12 here

BEFORE YOU CONTINUE, I ASK YOU VISIT THIS POST (PRESS ANYWHERE HERE) AND READ IT, AND ACKNOWLEDGE YOU HAVE DONE SO BY MAKING A COMMENT ON THAT POST

Please continue the conversion here in relation to Gerard Baden Clay, who is on remand in jail, after having be denied bail, for the alleged Murder of his wife Allison Baden-Clay

UPDATE 27/06/12

DETAILS have emerged in the murder case against Gerard Baden-Clay from affidavits relied on for his Supreme Court bail application.

The affidavits handed to the court for his Friday bail application included details of text messages Baden-Clay allegedly sent to his wife Allison on the morning he reported her missing where he repeatedly asked where she was.

As part of the investigation, Baden-Clay also provided police with an extensive curriculum vitae, revealing his past schooling and work history.

(I bet he didn’t miss a beat, getting all he has done in there either)

Details are reproduced below:

Gerard Baden-Clay

  • Born September 9, 1970, in Bournemouth, England.
  • He spent his younger years in Rhodesia (Zimbabwe)
  • Married to Allison June Baden-Clay (nee Dickie) on 23 August, 1997
  • His family (father Nigel, mother Elaine, sister Olivia and brother Adam) came to Australia in 1980 when he was 10 years-old after forming the view that it would be “safer to live in Australia”.
  • They initially lived in Melbourne, Victoria, for eight months before settling in Toowoomba in 1981.
  • Gerard completed primary school in Toowoomba at Gabbinbar State School.
  • He then went to Toowoomba Grammar School until 1987, completing year 12.
  • Obtained a tertiary entrance score of 900.
  • While at high school, he worked as a waiter at Squatters (a Toowoomba restaurant) and also undertook strawberry and potato picking in Lockyer Valley.
  • Represented Toowoomba in hockey in under 17 and under 21 divisions.
  • After school, he completed five years in a Bachelor of Business (majoring in accounting and computing) at the now University of Southern Queensland, formerly the Darling Downs Institute of Advanced Education.
  • At the same time, he spent three years with the Australia Army Reserve as a training officer.
  • While studying he supplemented his income chipping onions and picking potatoes in the Lockyer Valley and continuing to work as a waiter at the Squatters restaurant.
  • From 1991-93 he worked as an accountant in the Audit Division of KPMG Peat Marwick. For approximately 12 months, Gerard worked as a company accountant for Designer Workwear.
  • From 1994-97 he worked at Flight Centre, initially as a travel consultant for the first 24-hour division, managing his own outlet. Later, he worked as an office and recruitment systems manager.
  • At Flight Centre he met wife Allison and after marrying, they travelled overseas.
  • In London, he worked as a Financial Systems Consultant with Blockbuster International for six months while Allison worked with Dale Karnegie Training.
  • While overseas, he also worked in the Project Department of Kandersteg International Scouts Centre, Switzerland, as a volunteer for three months. Later, he worked as an assistant director of the International Scouts Centre for 12 months.
  • Gerard returned home with Allison in 1999 and went back to Flight Centre as the Global Systems and Communications Manager until the end of 2000.
  • After that, he worked at Raine & Horne at Kenmore for 10 months.
  • Gerard obtained his real estate agent’s licence during the period from late 2003 to early 2004.
  • He started as Principal and Managing Director of Century 21 Westside in 2004, where he remained until his arrest on June 13.

* Source: Gerard Baden-Clay affidavit dated June 21, 2012

Update on photographic evidence showing blood in Baden-Clay car coming…

UPDATE 27/06/12 HERE IS IS…CHECK OUT THESE DAMNING PHOTOS OF WHAT THE CROWN SAYS IS ALLISONS BLOOD IN THE BADEN-CLAY CAR

Gerard Baden-Clay’s affidavits handed to court claim he sent text messages to wife Allison on morning he reported her missing

June 27, 2012

DRAMATIC details have emerged in the murder case against Gerard Baden-Clay from affidavits relied on for his Supreme Court bail application.

The affidavits handed to the court for his Friday bail application include details of text messages Baden-Clay allegedly sent to his wife Allison on the morning he reported her missing where he repeatedly asked where she was.

According to the affidavitt filed by police and referred to in court on Friday, at 6.20am on April 20, 2012, Gerard Baden-Clay sent a text message to his wife Allison’s mobile phone saying:

“Good morning! Hope you slept well? Where are you? None of the girls are up yet! Love G”.

No reply was received from this text message, the court documents say.

The police affidavitt says at 6.41am on April 20, Gerard Baden Clay sent another text message to his wife Allison’s mobile phone saying:

“Al, getting concerned. Where are you? The app doesn’t say either? … I’m dressed and about to make lunches. Please just text me back or call! Love G”.

Again there was no reply received from this text message.

The documents also say the phone was allegedly used shortly after midnight to call his father’s phone via a “face time” call, which allows both parties to see each other and talk.

In an affidavit dated June 21 lodged in the Supreme Court in support of his bail application, Baden Clay said he was not a flight or suicide risk.

“There has never been any suggestion of flight,” he said.

“I have never considered it. I maintain my innocence and will be strenuously defending the charges.”

Baden Clay said in the affidavit he also had “no intention of self harm”.

“I note that no attempts of self harm have been made by me despite the intense media scrutiny, and the report of me as a person of interest as early as 23 April 2012,” he said in the affidavit.

“Over the whole of the period from 20 April 2012 I have not seen or been told anything to suggest that the police were looking at anyone else other than myself as a principal suspect.”

Baden-Clay, who was arrested on June 13, said the arrest occurred at his workplace when he was leaving to collect his children from school.

Baden-Clay was refused bail on Friday after Justice David Boddice said, after taking all factors into account, he considered he was a flight risk.

The documents reveal that several friends offered cash to the court as surety to help the 41-year-old get bail.

Ashgrove resident Dr Ifor Thomas, who once worked as a missionary doctor in Nigeria, offered $5000 to help secure Baden-Clay’s release.

“I am aware of the intense media scrutiny in this matter,” he wrote in his affidavit.

“I provide this surety understanding that my offer to provide the surety could be publicised in the print and television media.”

Peter and Tanya Cranna, of Grange, offered $50,000 surety.

Mr Cranna is the director of finance and infrastructure for the Churches of Christ, Queensland and his wife is a Care Connect case manager.

The Crannas said they offered the $50,000 knowing they would have to sell their house if Baden-Clay failed to appear.

During Friday’s bail hearing, prosecutor Danny Boyle claimed in the court Baden-Clay was more than $1 million in debt and stood to gain $967,000 from his wife’s life insurance policies and superannuation fund.

He alleged Baden-Clay told his mistress, Toni McHugh, he would leave his wife for her after he had “sorted out” his financial situation.

Police also allege Baden-Clay was having affairs with two other women – affairs Ms McHugh had not known about.

Peter Davis, SC, for Baden-Clay, described the Crown case as “weak”, saying there had been no cause of death ascertained from the post-mortem examination, no evidence as to where she was killed, what date or time she was killed and no evidence to show he had left his home on the night she disappeared.

Mr Davis also questioned police claims that the blood found in the vehicle was Allison’s, and rejected claims by the Crown that Allison was murdered, put in the car and dumped.

“The post-mortem doesn’t support that,” he said, and that it was a luminol test only and not her blood.

Mr Davis said the only injury revealed a chip to her bottom left eye tooth.

“There are no cuts or wounds from which she could bleed,” he said.

The following timeline has been compiled from police and forensic investigations of Mr Baden-Clay’s iPhone submitted to the court:

April 12, 2012

Police allege Mr Baden-Clay inquired about one of Mrs Baden-Clay’s life insurance policies but was given no information as he was not a policy holder.

April 17, 2012

Police allege the Baden-Clay financial adviser made a “further query” on a life insurance policy held by Mrs Baden-Clay.

April 18, 2012

At 10.08pm, police allege Mr Baden-Clay searched “taking the fifth”, which led to results including ‘self incrimination’, which he accessed through Wikipedia.

April 19, 2012 (the day, police allege, Mrs Baden-Clay was killed)

Mr Baden-Clay and his alleged mistress, Toni McHugh, have a conversation in the afternoon about their relationship’s future.

About 6.30pm, Mrs Baden-Clay leaves her local Kenmore hairdresser. The hairdresser told police Mrs Baden-Clay was having her hair done because she planned to attend a real estate conference the following day. Police said the hairdresser told them “it was unusual from conversations she had with the deceased about having her hair done for the event that she would go walking or exercising prior to attending the conference”.

About 8.30pm Mr Baden-Clay’s phone was removed from the charger.

Mr Baden-Clay told police he and Mrs Baden-Clay had a conversation but would not say which exact topics were discussed.

Mr Baden-Clay had also told police he and Mrs Baden-Clay had been attending counselling services over his infidelity, which had ceased. He said the counsellor had advised they talk about the infidelity and relationship issues for 15 minute blocks at night.

April 20, 2012 (the day Mrs Baden-Clay was reported missing)

Mrs Baden-Clay was due to attend a real estate conference, which her husband’s mistress, Toni McHugh, was also to attend.

About 12.30am: Police allege Mr Baden-Clay made a Face Time call to his father, Nigel Baden-Clay, which lasted 1.23 minutes. The time of the phone call was divined by converting the time stamp of the phone call from 2.30.25pm (UTC+0) and converted into Queensland time by adding 10 hours.

1.48am: police allege Mr Baden-Clay’s phone was returned to the charger.

Mr Baden-Clay told police he woke up at 6.15am.

6.20am: Police allege Mr Baden-Clay sent a text message to Mrs Baden-Clay saying: “Good morning! Hope you slept well? Where are you? None of the girls are up yet! Love G”

6.41am: A second text message was reportedly sent saying “Al, getting concerned. Where are you? The app doesn’t say either? [Two children] now up. I’m dressed and about to make lunches. Please just text me back or call! Love G”.

7.09am: Police allege Mr Baden-Clay searched the term ‘self incrimination’ on the internet.

7.14am: It is alleged Mr Baden-Clay accessed the Queensland Police Service home page.

7.15am: Mr Baden-Clay called triple-0.

8.30am: Uniformed police arrive at the home in response to the triple-0 call

9.34am: Police allege Mr Baden-Clay searched ‘psychiatrists Brisbane West’ on his phone.

9.54am: Police commenced the investigation into Mrs Baden-Clay’s disappearance.

10.14am: Triangulation of Mrs Baden-Clay’s phone showed the handset was possibly in a four-kilometre radius to her home.

3pm: A second triangulation of Mrs Baden-Clay’s phone returned the same result. A crime scene was declared at the Baden-Clay home and yard.

Mr Baden-Clay was asked to give a formal statement as part of the missing person investigation.

Police said he obtained legal advice and declined to be formally interviewed.

Police had noticed scratches on Mr Baden-Clay’s right side cheek, which were photographed by scenes of crimes officers.

Mr Baden-Clay told the officer the scratches were caused by an old shaver.

In the documents, police said they appeared to be scratches “similar to scratches made by fingernails as they are not straight or clean cuts normally made by a sharp razor blade”.

Mr Baden-Clay’s parents, Nigel and Elaine, gave “brief statements” to police.

The investigators allege Mr Nigel Baden-Clay did not mention the Face Time call from his son’s mobile phone.

Police investigators maintain that neither Mr Nigel Baden-Clay or Mrs Elaine Baden-Clay had consented to further interviews with police.

April 21, 2012

Mr Baden-Clay voluntarily attended the Indooroopilly Police Station with his lawyers and voluntarily provided a DNA sample and allowed police to take photos of his body.

Scratches and abrasions on his chest, torso and neck were photographed.

April 22, 2012

Mr Baden-Clay was involved in an accident on the way to Indooroopilly police station. Police allege there no brake marks at the scene and Mr Baden-Clay refused to answer questions about the crash.

They allege the crash was staged to “mask injuries or to cause self-injury”.

Police examine the Baden-Clay’s Holden Captiva SUV, which they had owned for eight weeks.

They allegedly found a “blood smear” in the rear of the vehicle and a strand of blonde hair.

Investigators alleged that the smear was “a contact smear” and resulted in “a further droplet of blood falling below the smear onto the floor of the vehicle”. Police allege the blood was identified as Mrs Baden-Clay’s, but examinations into the hair were continuing.

Ms McHugh spoke with police and gave a statement about her relationship with Mr Baden-Clay.

She said the relationship began soon after she started working at Mr Baden-Clay’s real estate agency in 2008. She said both her relationship and employment ended in October 2011, but recommended in December 2012.

Ms McHugh told police she was still in a relationship with Mr Baden-Clay and he had promised he was going to leave Mrs Baden-Clay. Ms McHugh said Mr Baden-Clay had told her he had told his wife this.

April 30, 2012

Mrs Baden-Clay’s body was found by a canoeist at Kholo Creek.

Police allege Mr Baden-Clay contacted his financial advisor who made a “further query” with one of the life insurance providers.

May 1, 2012

One of the life insurers was advised “of a pending claim on that policy” by Mr Baden-Clay’s financial advisor. Mrs Baden-Clay’s body was yet to be formally identified.

Police allege Mr Baden Clay “urgently sought a death certificate for the deceased”.

May 21, 2012

A death certificate for Mrs Baden-Clay was issued. Police allege Mr Baden-Clay lodged claims with each of Mrs Baden-Clay’s policies and “further asked that these claims be expedited”.

June 13, 2012

At 3pm, Mr Baden-Clay was arrested at the Toowong Towers car park. Police allege the scratches on Mr Baden-Clay’s face have scarred and have been “partially obscured by beard growth”.

He is charged with murder and interfering with a corpse.

June 14, 2012

A government medical officer advises police a shaving cut is “usually a epidermal nick and is not likely to scar given that they don’t break the dermis. A non-intimate forensic order is requested to shave the relevant part of Mr Baden-Clay’s face, examine and take photograph of the injuries”.

Mr Baden-Clay faces court for the first time.

The police investigation into Mr Baden-Clay’s financial situation allegedly revealed he owed more than $1 million to friends, family, associates and financial institutions.

Police allege that $290,000 of the debt was due to be paid back by June 30, however they allege their inquiries “have failed to identify any legitimate means of salvaging his debt or finances prior to July 2012 in order to meet his commitment to (Ms) McHugh without a large influx of funds from these insurance policies”.

Among the debts listed were:

  • $275,000 owed in “gentlemen’s agreements” with three friends.
  • $200,000 to to a friend in a contracted agreement due for payment on 30 June, 2012.
  • $90,000 to another friend in a contracted agreement due for payment on 30 June, 2012.
  • $75,000 to a business associate.
  • $15,000 in outstanding franchise fees to Century 21 Australia.
  • $45,000 credit card debt.
  • $58,000 to his parents. (identified through a financial analysis ordered by police).

Gerard Baden-Clay receives first visitors in Arthur Gorrie Correctional Centre since his arrest for alleged murder of wife Allison

by: Alison Sandy

June 26, 2012 12:00AM

THE family of Gerard Baden-Clay have visited him for the first time since he was charged with the murder of his wife Allison.

Baden-Clay’s father Nigel and sister Olivia Walton had a non-contact visit yesterday morning with the 41-year-old accused murderer at Arthur Gorrie Correctional Centre in Wacol.

They were separated by a glass wall.

Queensland Corrective Services confirmed their meeting lasted two hours – from 9am to 11am – and it was the first time anybody had been to see Baden-Clay since his arrest almost two weeks ago, except for his lawyer, Darren Mahony.

Baden-Clay lost his bid for bail last week after the judge ruled him a flight risk.

Baden-Clay was in ‘dire financial position’, police allege

AMY REMEIKIS
26 Jun, 2012 04:09 PM

Accused murderer Gerard Baden-Clay, who owed more than $1 million, made claims on his wife’s insurance policies, totalling $960,000, according to police documents.

Former Century 21 Westside saleswoman Toni McHugh had an affair with Gerard Baden-Clay

His mistress Toni McHugh allegedly told police that Mr Baden-Clay had told her he would “sort out his financial situation and they would be together by 1 July 2012″.

Police allege that Mr Baden-Clay used the pseudonym ‘‘Bruce Overland’’ in emails to Ms McHugh after his wife’s disappearance.

The 41-year-old real estate agent has been charged with the murder of his wife Allison.

The documents formed part of the prosecution case against his application for bail in the Supreme Court last week. He was remanded in custody.

Mr Baden-Clay reported his 43-year-old wife missing through a triple-0 call on April 20.

Ten days later, the mother-of-three’s body was found by a canoist in a Brisbane creek about 14 kilometres from the Baden-Clay home in Brookfield in Brisbane’s west.

Earlier this month, Mr Baden-Clay was arrested and charged with Mrs Baden-Clay’s murder and interfering with her body by moving her to the location where she was found.

In documents submitted to the court, police investigators wrote “extensive financial investigations reveal that the defendant is in a dire financial position with debts of over $1,000,000″.

The document went on to reveal: “a significant amount of this debt was immediately due by 30 June 2012.”

“The defendant stands to gain a significant amount of money from life insurance policies for the deceased. Investigations indicate recent inquiries regarding these accounts made by the defendant prior to the disappearance of his wife.”

Police investigations revealed Mrs Baden-Clay’s three life insurance policies totalled $960,000 and Mr Baden-Clay had made a claim on all three policies.

An affidavit from Mr Baden-Clay, submitted by his legal team and presented to the court, revealed the defendant intended to “strenuously contest the charges levelled against” him.

In the document, Mr Baden-Clay says his business was ‘‘suffering serious financial stress after the Brisbane floods’’ and he had borrowed about $350,000 from friends and family to support the business.

He was aware police had considered him a suspect from April 23, when an article appeared in The Courier-Mail quoting police as naming him as a “person of interest”.

Mr Baden-Clay’s affidavit made mention of the “extensive” media attention directed at himself and his family.

“Notwithstanding the scrutiny, the suggestion of me being the prime suspect and the widespread nationwide speculation throughout the community and in the press I remained prioritising the care and support of my children endeavouring to provide stability and structure in an extraordinarily difficult time,” the document read.

Hundreds of pages of media reports, written and broadcast about the Baden-Clay case, were included in the documents submitted to the court.

Mr Baden-Clay’s mistress Toni McHugh, who was named in court as having a long-term relationship with Mr Baden-Clay, was mentioned in the documents as having told police their affair began in 2008.

Police allege Ms McHugh said their relationship ended in October 2011, when Mrs Baden-Clay discovered the affair, but resumed in December of that year.

Ms McHugh allegedly told police Mr Baden-Clay would “sort out his financial situation and they would be together by 1 July 2012″.

Police allege that Mr Baden-Clay stayed in contact with Ms McHugh after Mrs Baden-Clay’s disappearance, using a pseudonym “Bruce Overland” in emails.

Investigators contend that the pseudonym was used by the pair and submitted an email from April 3, 2012 at 5.40pm where Mr Baden-Clay, allegedly as Bruce Overland, wrote: “I have given you a commitment and I intend to stick to it. I will be separated by July 1″ and went on to “state his love” for Ms McHugh.

Police investigations allegedly found Mr Baden-Clay had “extra-marital affairs with at least three women” since 2008.

I got an SMS too, just today from Gerard….It is about as genuine as the one he sent to the wife he allegedly killed


 

So what now for Gerard Baden-Clay?


NEW POST HERE http://aussiecriminals.com.au/2012/06/26/gerard-baden-clay-gets-visitors-new-evidence-photos-released/
Previous threads can be found using the links below, One being very first and so on…

One (26/04/12) here Two (14/05/12)  here Three (17/05/12) here Four (20/05/2012) here Five  (23/05/12) here Six (26/05/12) here Seven (28/05/12) here Eight (30/0512) here Nine (02/06/12) here Ten (08/06/12) here Eleven (11/06/12) here  Twelve 13/06/12 here Thirteen 17/06/12 here Fourteen 20/06/12 here Fifteen 22/06/12 here

HI FOLKS THIS IS JUST TO KICK OFF A NEW THREAD AS THE PREVIOUS HAS GOT SLUGGISH…EXPECT EDITS OVER THE DAY

What a specimen…What a PRETENDER

GBC allegedly called himself Bruce Overland and promised he would come to her a free man by July 1.

But Toni McHugh knew him as Gerard Baden-Clay – her long-time colleague and lover who wanted to free himself from his wife and his life so they could be together.

What she did not know, until police told her, was that Baden-Clay was also allegedly having affairs with two other women, police have claimed in documents tendered in opposition to his bail application yesterday.

According to those same court documents, Baden-Clay had severe financial problems and the string of mistresses.

Peter Davis, SC, for Baden-Clay, described the Crown case as “weak”, saying there had been no cause of death ascertained from the post-mortem examination, no evidence as to where she was killed, what date or time she was killed and no evidence to show he had left his home on the night she disappeared.

Justice David Boddice rejected that, saying the circumstantial case had factors that “if accepted by a jury” would make a strong argument.

He denied Baden-Clay’s application for bail, saying the Brookfield father of three remained a flight risk.

The affidavits filed in the Supreme Court reveal much about the Crown’s case for murder against the Brookfield real estate agent.

According to the police bail documents, on April 12, when Allison Baden-Clay had barely a week left to live, her husband picked up the phone in his office and dialled the company that held one of her two life insurance policies.

He asked for information on the policy but was told it could not be provided because it was not in his name, police alleged.

It had been more than a week since he had emailed his lover from a fake email account, reaffirming his love and reiterating a promise.

“I have given you a commitment and I intend to stick to it. I will be separated by 1 July,” he wrote to Ms McHugh under his pseudonym, the police documents claim.

His commitment, the police have alleged, involved sorting out his extremely dire financial situation so he could leave his family and be with her.

He could not afford a divorce, he allegedly told her, but he would work things out so they could be together, the police court papers say.

The documents say that on April 18, two days before he would place a Triple 0 call to report his wife missing, Baden-Clay picked up his iPhone, logged onto the internet and searched the term “taking the Fifth”.

The search yielded a raft of results, but Baden-Clay allegedly clicked on the “self-incrimination” Wikipedia link.

When Allison disappeared, the police argued, Baden-Clay was $1 million in debt.

Of that, $275,000 was owed to friends in “gentlemen’s agreements”, $200,000 to a former business partner, $335,000 as guarantor on a mortgage, $45,000 on a credit card, $75,000 to the CEO of Century 21, various business loans and police allege $58,000 to his parents, Nigel and Elaine.

“Enquiries to date have failed to identify any legitimate means of salvaging his debt or finances prior to July 2012 in order to meet his commitment to McHugh,” the police affidavit said.

But Baden-Clay had found a quick means of earning $967,000, the Crown has alleged, in his wife’s life insurance policies and superannuation fund.

In the police documents, officers said he told them he had gone to bed at 10pm and left her watching television.

He is such a heavy sleeper, he told them, that he had no idea whether she came to bed.

But the next morning, on April 20, he became concerned when he awoke about 6am and found her missing.

She was supposed to have gone to a real estate conference that morning and she needed to leave by 7am, police claim he told them.

But before he called police, he again allegedly logged onto his phone and searched for “self-incrimination”.

From there, he searched the Queensland Police Service website before dialling Triple 0, the bail documents say.

That morning police claim he would give four different stories to friends and family about a walk Allison could have taken when she disappeared.

To some, officers say, he said Allison liked to take a walk early in the morning. To his sister, Olivia Walton, he allegedly described a particular route. He told a close friend of Allison’s that she would walk at 10pm each night and he described to Allison’s parents two different walking routes.

But when police asked, they said he told them he had no idea where she would have gone walking.

A local hairdresser who had done Allison’s hair on April 19 said she would never have ruined her new “do” by exercising, the police argued in court papers.

Baden-Clay allegedly told police that day his wife had found out about an affair he’d been having. An affair that he had ended in September, 2011.

They had been having counselling, officers said he told them, and the counsellor had suggested they talk about the affair.

He allegedly told police he had had a conversation with his wife the night before but would not say what they discussed.

Police who searched the Brookfield Rd house would find a journal Allison had been keeping and according to the police affidavit, on April 18 and 19 she had been writing about her husband’s affair.

One entry was a list of questions: “how were the hotels paid for?” “Did ‘she’ ever say she felt bad because he was married?” “How many people in the office knew?” “Did (the defendant) regret the whole thing, or just being caught?”

Despite saying he had a heavy night of sleep, police have alleged Baden-Clay was awake for most of it.

Police say phone records show at 8.45pm, his phone was removed from its charger. It was plugged back in at 1.48am.

Shortly after midnight, it was allegedly used to call his father’s phone via a “FaceTime” call, which allows both parties to see each other and talk.

At 6.18am, Baden-Clay’s phone was again taken off the charger, the police bail documents say.

An examination of Baden-Clay’s car, leased just eight weeks earlier, found blood in the rear boot section and a blonde hair, the police claim in their opposition to bail.

The hair is still undergoing examination, the court documents say. The blood came back as belonging to Allison, the court was told.

But barrister for Baden-Clay, Mr Davis, questioned police claims that the blood found in the vehicle was Allison’s, and the Crown seemed to assert that Allison was murdered, put in the car and dumped.

“The post-mortem doesn’t support that,” he said, and that it was a luminol test only and not her blood.

Mr Davis said the only injury revealed a chip to her bottom left eye tooth.

“There are no cuts or wounds from which she could bleed,” he said.

The police claimed in their court documents, Baden-Clay maintained contact with Ms McHugh.

Police say Ms McHugh had told them he called her from pay phones and emailed her as Bruce Overland. He needed to “lay low” he said, but he would be in touch.

On April 30, when a body was found by a passing canoeist under the Kholo Creek bridge, Baden-Clay was allegedly back on his phone.

In their court affidavit, police say Baden-Clay allegedly had his financial adviser call about Allison’s life insurance policy, letting the company know there was a pending claim. He did this, police told the court, before the body had even been identified.

Baden-Clay also allegedly requested a copy of her death certificate and made claims against both of her policies.

Mr Davis said the discovery of the body was well publicised, and in relation to his financial affairs his client was only doing what he was obliged to do.

He said there was no evidence of a weapon, or that he had left the family home on the evening of her disappearance, or been seen in the vicinity of where Allison was discovered.

He argued there was no evidence of a cause of death, nor a geographical location of death, nor was there anything that placed his client where his wife’s body was found.

But the judge found Baden-Clay was flight risk and denied bail.

He is due to appear in the Brisbane Magistrates Court on July 9 for committal mention.

NEW POST HERE FOLKS http://aussiecriminals.com.au/2012/06/26/gerard-baden-clay-gets-visitors-new-evidence-photos-released/