Rebels torture own member mirroring Bikie TV show


This is how to deal with problems is it? Well stuff that, throw these ass-holes in jail long-term one after the other, and along with new the anti Bikie laws and we may actually get somewhere.

The justice handed out by these bottom dwellers  is not how we want our society to be judged by. Make sure you read further down, this is not a one-off, it is a way of dealing with life in bikie clubs and unless we do something nothing will change and folks will be maimed, tortured, killed in the presence of family (or whoever)  on a weekly basis…

Scroll to bottom of page to see descriptions of the major (and minor) Bikie Gangs in Australia


Rebels torture own member Sons of Anarchy style

November 16, 2014

rebels

 It was said to be a Sons of Anarchy-inspired torture in which nipples were sliced, skin was seared and bones were broken.

But the eight Rebels bikie members who allegedly tortured a former president of their group never dreamed he would talk to police.   

The leader of a local chapter was allegedly hog-tied with cable leads and tortured until he lost consciousness during a 36-hour kidnapping by fellow members.

Police allege the torture is part of a violent ritual for members who leave the outlawed bikie club on bad terms.

The arrest of the eight senior members was a huge blow to the gang, at a time when their national president, Alex Vella, remained stranded in Malta after his visa was revoked.

Details of the alleged torture session emerged during a Supreme Court bail application for lifelong member Andrew Lloyd Hughes on Friday.

Other members charged with the kidnapping included sergeant-at-arms of the Liverpool chapter Khaldoun Al Majid, Matthew Rymer, Jamie Saliba, Ram Lafta and Darrell Pologa.

The court heard  the 45-year-old victim was first confronted by up to 10 masked men in the driveway of his Castlereagh home on May 8.

He was knocked unconscious and woke up in his kitchen where he was allegedly bashed and burned for the next two days.

The group allegedly seared his palms and the top of his feet repeatedly with a knife that had been heated up by a blowtorch.

His right arm was smashed with such force that surgery was required to replace a metal plate that was broken.

He was beaten unconscious several times after being punched repeatedly in the face and body.

Police allege some members of the group held him down while others sliced open both his nipples.

The group, who are attached to the Liverpool and Penrith chapters,  then left him unconscious and took off with three of his cars, a quad bike and a yellow ski boat.

When the victim regained consciousness two days after he was first taken captive, there was no one left in his house.

He managed to free himself with a knife and ran to a neighbouring house before a friend drove him to Nepean hospital.

The NSW Supreme court heard on Friday that many of the accused were captured on footage obtained from an intercom system at the front of the house.

Police allege Hughes was present after finding a fingerprint of his on a banister inside the house.

But barrister John Korn said his client was in no way involved in the kidnapping and had left a fingerprint at the house on a previous occasion.

“All the Crown has is a fingerprint,” he said.

Justice Robert Hulme refused Hughes bail, citing concerns he would engage in similar activities if released from custody.

Outside court, solicitor Warwick Korn said his client Hughes  had nothing to do with the violent kidnapping.

“We call the Crown case abysmally weak,” Mr Korn said.

All eight members are before the courts charged with special aggravated kidnapping and participating in a criminal group.

The arrests were made after gang squad detectives set up strikeforce Salsola.


Bikie gangs increasingly seeing Victoria as safe haven, police association says

Mon 17 Nov 2014, 11:42am

Tough anti-bikie laws being implemented in many Australian states have led outlaw motorcycle gangs to see Victoria as a haven, the Victorian Police Association says.

Queensland, New South Wales and South Australia introduced anti-consorting and control laws, but Victorian legislation has not gone as far.

Police Association secretary Ron Iddles said the Mongols‘ growing presence in Victoria added to concerns that bikie groups now saw Victoria as “a safe haven”.

“I think what we saw on the weekend with the Mongols coming to Victoria was around that fact,” Mr Iddles told the ABC, referring to a reported gathering of members in Melbourne.

“They were a Queensland-based group and now they want to base themselves here in Victoria.”

He said the gangs were very well structured groups and knew “exactly what they were doing”.

“Recently, the Rebels were going to have a function at Wagga (in NSW), but they decided to come into Victoria because they considered it was less obtrusive to operate here in Victoria,” he said.

“I think if you look at a lot of the statistics and intelligence that is around, there is no doubt that organised motorcycle groups are behind a lot of the major drug trafficking, including ice.

Mr Iddles said the current Victorian legislation was clunky and hard to operate.

“It needs to be totally overhauled and we need to look at something like Queensland, otherwise we’ll have every major group working out of Melbourne,” he said.

Victoria to consider tougher laws after ruling: Clark

Attorney-General Robert Clark said Victoria would look at Queensland’s anti-association laws after the High Court rejected a challenged to them last week.

The United Motorcycle Council (UMC) had launched the challenge on behalf of 17 clubs against the state’s Vicious Lawless Association Disestablishment (VLAD) laws.

It argued the laws, designed to disrupt the activities of 26 outlaw motorcycle clubs, were an attack on the judiciary, freedom of speech, and the right to associate.

The UMC said the laws enlisted the courts to carry out Parliament’s intention to destroy their organisations, which was at odds with the Constitution.

But the High Court found the laws did not require the courts to do any more than exercise their judicial power in the usual way.

“It’s not really practical to legislate when you don’t know what the High Court is going to rule so now we can look at opportunities to strengthen Victoria’s consorting laws,” Mr Clark said.

“We brought in a further round of strengthening those laws that came into operation from 1 October.

“Wherever we’ve had the opportunity we’ve been willing to act and now that we’ve had these two High Court rulings, we’ll look at what further opportunities that opens up.”

 Bikies jailed after ‘night of terror’ where ex-clubmate was tortured

January 31, 2014

Steve Butcher

Taniora Tangaloa (left), Jack Vaotangi and Jasmin Destanovic.

Taniora Tangaloa (left), Jack Vaotangi and Jasmin Destanovic.

Three bikies who subjected a former clubmate to a “night of terror” and torture have been jailed by a Melbourne judge who warned such conduct would not be tolerated.

Stephen Jones, 47, had a handgun shoved in his mouth and the trigger pulled, his ear was sliced with a knife, and he was stabbed, cut and bashed before being kicked in the face.

One of the Harley Davidson motorcycles that were stolen.One of the Harley Davidson motorcycles that were stolen.

A guitar was also smashed over his head before the men stole his two Harley-Davidson motorcycles, his car, a laptop, telescope and other items valued at more than $100,000.

Mr Jones sustained injuries that included a broken left cheek and eye socket, stab wounds and cuts to his face, nose and forehead that left permanent scarring and a cracked tooth. His ear was sewn back on.

A Melbourne County Court jury last year found Taniora Tangaloa, 38, Jack Vaotangi, 35, and Jasmin Destanovic, 36, guilty of armed robbery, aggravated burglary and intentionally causing serious injury.

They could not reach a verdict on a fourth man whose prosecution was later discontinued by the Crown.

The men claimed they had not been in Mr Jones’ Epping house on January 15, 2009, when he was attacked about 7.30pm.

Judge Bill Stuart on Friday described the mens’ conduct as “brazen” and which “cannot be tolerated”.

In his sentencing remarks, Judge Stuart said that “everyone in our community is entitled to feel safe and secure in their own homes”.

Mr Jones had been a member of the Rebels and later the Bandidos outlaw motorcycle clubs but had wanted a change of lifestyle.

He told the jury he met Tangaloa at the Rebels in 2001, with Vaotangi and Destanovic, and later he was invited to the Bandidos where they resumed a friendship.

In November 2008, he phoned Tangaloa, who was upset to hear of his plans to quit the group.

The emotional trauma from that “night of terror”, he wrote in a victim impact statement, caused extreme anxiety, recurring nightmares and “living in fear for the rest of my life”.

Prosecutor Alex Albert had submitted that the viciousness and “mental torture” seemed unnecessary, and that all three – despite Tangaloa wielding the gun, articulating threats and smashing the guitar and Vaotangi slitting the ear – supported, assisted and encouraged the other with little distinction in their culpability.

Mr Jones told Michael Sharpley, for Tangaloa, that his client would “put the fear of God into me, saying he was gunna kill me if we spoke to the police”.

Mr Jones rejected the suggestion from Destanovic’s barrister Wayne Toohey he was a “cunning liar” and that his client was not present.

Tangaloa, a “pallet technician” and father of 11 from three relationships, who has no prior convictions, was described by supporters as a generous family man, charitable, and one who “gives of himself to his friends”.

Destanovic, a father of five and a painter and decorator who has criminal convictions that include assault, seemed, said Mr Toohey, “like a normal, run of the mill fellow”.

Barrister James McQuillan said Vaotangi, a married father of three, had convictions for violence, but was “essentially a family man” from a good Christian family who at the time of the incident was “out of control” on ice when associating with the “wrong crowd”.

Judge Stuart found the purpose of beating Mr Jones was “principally to terrify him” and so ensure he did not identify his attackers.

While the three had initially succeeded in that endeavour, two weeks after the attack Mr Jones identified each man.

“You underestimated him,” Judge Stuart told the men.

Judge Stuart said the five year delay from offence to sentence was a “powerful mitigating circumstance” and he also regarded that each man had good prospects for rehabilitation.

Tangaloa and Destanovic were jailed for eight years with a minimum of five years, less 307 days each for pre-sentence detention.

Vaotangi was jailed for seven-and-a-half years with a minimum of four-and-a-half years, less 258 days pre sentence detention.


Bikie beating fells ex-Bandidos member

Date
December 29, 2013

This Bandidos member never thought leaving would unleash the hell it did.

Stephen Jones simply didn’t want to be an outlaw motorcycle gang member any more.

He’d been with the Rebels and later the Bandidos but got ”fed up” with the lifestyle and wanted to go straight.

Mr Jones, 47, aimed to spend time with his young daughter, run a family business and be ”happy to have a few friends who had Harleys and go for a ride”.

Although adamant there was no ”bad blood” on quitting the Bandidos, he knew the bond was over. But he never imagined that the parting would unleash hell.

January 15, 2009, had been hot, and as evening simmered towards sunset, life in Earlybird Way, Epping, appeared normal and neighbourly.

Mr Jones had woken from a nap and was on the phone to a friend about 6.30pm to arrange a ride when the doorbell rang.

He peered out and saw former clubmates Jack Vaotangi and Jasmin Destanovic at the front door, which had been bashed in.

Mr Jones, wearing only underpants, cowered in his en suite and dialled 000, but before he could push the ”send” button they, now with Taniora Tangaloa, had him.

A handgun was shoved in his mouth and the trigger pulled, his ear was sliced with a knife, and he was stabbed, cut and bashed before being viciously kicked in the face. A guitar was smashed over his head.

And in a final indignity, especially for a biker, the men rode off on his prized possessions – two Harley-Davidson motorcycles. They also stole his car, a laptop, telescope and other items, the plunder valued at more than $100,000.

A Melbourne County Court jury found Tangaloa, 38, Vaotangi, 35, and Destanovic, 36, guilty of armed robbery, aggravated burglary and intentionally causing serious injury, but could not reach a verdict on a fourth man whose prosecution was later discontinued by the Crown.

After numerous delayed trials, the jury, by their verdicts, didn’t accept the men’s defence that they simply weren’t at the house.

Mr Jones listed injuries in his victim impact statement that included a broken left cheek and eye socket, stab wounds and cuts to his face, nose and forehead that left permanent scarring and a cracked tooth. His ear was sewn back on.

The emotional trauma from that ”night of terror”, he wrote, caused extreme anxiety, recurring nightmares and ” living in fear for the rest of my life”.

Why was he subjected to such vicious treatment?

Rather than retribution for leaving the club, Judge Bill Stuart regarded the men’s motivation as an apparent ”desire … to steal whatever they could”.

Judge Stuart also said the ”extreme beating” was to ”terrify him such that he will not report the thefts from his home”.

Prosecutor Alex Albert agreed, submitting that the viciousness and ”mental torture” seemed unnecessary, and that all three – despite Tangaloa wielding the gun, articulating threats and smashing the guitar and Vaotangi slitting the ear – supported, assisted and encouraged the other with little distinction in their culpability.

Mr Jones told the jury he met Tangaloa at the Rebels in 2001, with Vaotangi and Destanovic, and later he was invited to the Bandidos where they resumed a friendship, but there was ”bad blood” when some left that club.

In November 2008, he phoned Tangaloa, who was upset to hear him say ”I don’t want to be part of your group any more” because ”they like to keep the hard-core group together”.

”These blokes used to hug me and kiss me and say, ‘We love, brother,”’ he said.

The last words Tangaloa offered, Mr Jones recalled, were ”just keep in touch, take it easy”.

The next ones he heard from Tangaloa were on January 15 while he was on his knees – with Vaotangi and Destanovic holding his shoulders – after he had put a gun to his mouth: ”I want all the keys to your Harley-Davidsons, all the money you’ve got in the house, and today you’re gunna die.”

After the beating, Mr Jones remembered saying to himself, ”You’re still alive, you’re still alive” then the sound of his Harleys ”start up and go”.

He agreed with Michael Sharpley, for Tangaloa, that he first refused to identify his attackers, but later did.

”I had enough, I was fed up,” he said. ”I was in a bike club, I had nothing to do with bike clubs any more.

”Being in the bike clubs they grind into you that you’re not allowed to talk to police, you’re not allowed to identify anyone if you ever spoke to police. Joe [Tangaloa] would put the fear of God into me, saying he was gunna kill me if we spoke to the police.”

Mr Jones rejected the suggestion from Destanovic’s barrister Wayne Toohey he was a ”cunning liar” and that his client was not present.

He also denied he feared outside his door the husband of a Tony Mokbel associate whose wife he’d earlier had an affair with, or that Bandidos were responsible.

In pleas for mitigation that ended this week, Tangaloa, a ”pallet technician” and father of 11 from three relationships, who has no prior convictions, was described by supporters as a generous family man, charitable, and one who ”gives of himself to his friends”.

Destanovic, a father of five and a painter and decorator who has criminal convictions that include assault, seemed, said Mr Toohey, ”like a normal, run of the mill fellow” who had ”no great problem with the world”.

Barrister James McQuillan said Vaotangi, a married father of three, had convictions for violence, but was ”essentially a family man” from a good Christian family who at the time of the incident was ”out of control” on ice when associating with the ”wrong crowd”.

Now drug free, employed and back with his family, Vaotangi, said Mr McQuillan, ”wants to rectify his past”.

Judge Stuart, who will sentence the men next month, has acknowledged that the delay in finalising the charges was a significant factor.

By their colours: Outlaw motorcycle gang identification guide

According to the Australian Crime Commission, outlaw motorcycle gangs (OMCGs) are among the most identifiable components of Australia’s criminal landscape.

The ACC says OCMGs are active in all states and territories and lists 44 as being of interest, with a total of 179 chapters and 4,483 members.

The Rebels gang boasts by far the biggest membership, at 25 per cent of the total, while the Bandidos have 7 per cent, the Outlaws and Hells Angels 6 per cent, Lone Wolf 5 per cent and Comancheros 5 per cent.

There has been a 48 per cent increase of OMCG chapters since 2007, according to the ACC.

The joint National Attero Task Force was set up in 2012 to target the Rebels, considered one of Australia’s highest risk criminal threats, and claimed success by recovering $1.7 million owed to the Australian Taxation Office.

The authorities also laid 1,200 charges for such offences ranging from serious assault and kidnapping, to firearms, weapons, drugs, property and traffic offences.

Along with firearms, they recovered Tasers, machetes, knuckle dusters, throwing stars and illegal knives and batons.

Among the OMCGs of interest to Australian authorities, many have links with notorious overseas gangs.

Rebels

The Rebels are the only major home-grown gang and were formed in Brisbane several decades ago. They boast the country’s biggest membership and have been tied to various execution-style killings over the past decade, including the murder of three members of rival club the Bandidos.

The ongoing war has seen the clubhouse of the Rebels’ “mother” chapter in the inner-Brisbane suburb of Albion torched and shot at.

The Rebels have added suspected counterfeiting activities, tax evasion and trafficking stolen goods to their known involvement in drug manufacture and supply.

Bandidos

The Australian offshoot of the group formed in San Leon, Texas, claims to have formed in August 1983 when ex-members of the Comanchero club met and were “greatly impressed” by members of the American gang.

They were so impressed they split with Comanchero, causing an ongoing rift that culminated in the 1984 “Milperra Massacre” south-west of Sydney that left seven dead and 28 injured.

The Bandidos have been targeted by US law enforcement as one of the “big four” gangs involved in the drug trade, as well as arms dealing, money laundering, murder and extortion.

The US justice department regards them as a “growing criminal threat” to the country.

Hells Angels

The Hells Angels originated in California in the US and are easily the most notorious of the “1 per cent” bikie clubs – the ones that give 99 per cent of motorcyclists a bad name.

The gang operates in as many as 27 countries and poses a criminal threat on six continents, according to the US Department of Justice.

The club’s criminal activities are known to include drug production, transportation and distribution, as well as extortion, murder, money laundering and motorcycle theft.

Membership in the US is limited to white males who cannot be into child molestation, and the club’s website boasts that each of its members rides, on average, 20,000 miles a year.

In Australia, the club says it has 10 active chapters in all states except WA and Tasmania and also in the Northern Territory. Recent reports suggest that the Angels are trying to widen their footholds in the drug trade, bringing them in direct conflict with rivals such as the Comancheros.

Mongols

Formed in California in the 1970s, the Mongols Motorcycle Club is inspired (in name) by the empire of Genghis Khan and is believed to have about 70 chapters nationwide.

Many US members are former members of Los Angeles-area street gangs, leading the powerful US Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms to consider it the “most violent and dangerous” bikie gang operating there.

The Mongols, sworn enemies of the Hells Angels, boast of having chapters in the US, Mexico, Germany, Norway, France, Spain, Italy, Israel, Thailand and now Australia. Recent reports in the Fairfax media indicate the club has been scoping out territory for the club in Sydney and on Queensland’s Gold Coast.

A patched member from the Mongols’ France-based chapter had moved to the Gold Coast and aligned himself with the Finks, Fairfax reported last week, in an expansion bid.

Finks

The Finks arguably made their name in Australia after the “Ballroom Blitz”, a gang fight with Hells Angels members at a Gold Coast kickboxing tournament in 2006 featuring guns, knives, knuckledusters and chairs.

According to recent reports, the Finks are planning to patch over their whole group to the international powerhouse Mongols in a bid to become the most-feared outlaw club in Australia and circumvent moves by authorities to have the club declared a criminal organisation under controversial anti-association laws.

The news comes in the wake of three public bikie brawls on the Gold Coast.

It is believed to also have prompted the Federal Government to send a new federal anti-gang squad to Queensland’s Gold Coast to help the State Government in its crackdown on bikie gangs.

The patchover would involve the Finks swapping club support gear with Mongols “colours” and removing Finks club tattoos.

Comancheros

Thought to have instigated the Milperra massacre, the Comancheros are seen as encouraging a growing trend among bikie gangs to allow non-bikies to join.

The Daily Telegraph reported in August that the self-proclaimed national leader of the gang, Mark Buddle, had neither a motorcycle licence nor a bike.

“Show a modern Comanchero a motorbike and he wouldn’t know how to ride it,” former detective Duncan McNab told the paper.

“They are criminal gangs who sometimes get on a bike.” The phenomenon has even spawned the phrase “Nike bikie”, the paper wrote, as other bikie gangs look to recruit members to beef up their criminal activities.

The Victorian police earlier this month charged five members of the Comancheros over a recent spate of shootings in Melbourne’s south-east.

All but one of the Comancheros were accused of running a debt-collecting syndicate which allegedly uses violent standover tactics to get money from victims.

Other prominent OMCGs

  • Gypsy Jokers
  • Black Uhlans
  • Nomads
  • Rock Machine
  • Odin’s Warriors
  • Tramps (Wangaratta)
  • Satan’s Soldiers
  • Diablos (Bandidos)
  • Notorious
  • Vikings
  • Red Devils
  • Coffin Cheaters
  • Satan’s Riders
  • Devil’s Henchmen
  • Outlaws

Comanchero Jock Ross visits memorial 28 years after Milperra Massacre


The Milperra Massacre between the Bandidos and Comacheros took place back in 1984. The Comanchero founder JOCK ROSS AND HIS wife  VANESSA “NESS” ROSS visited the COMANCHERO MEMORIAL UP THE COAST AT Palmdale Memorial Park and Crematorium in 2012.

In fact this fathers day will mark 30 years to the day that 6 BIKIE CLUB MEMBERS WERE KILLED, 4 FROM THE COMANCHEROS, 2 FROM THE BANDIDOS AS WELL AS ONE MEMBER OF THE PUBLIC, TEENAGER LEANNE WALTERS, another 26 wounded (click here for my original comprehensive post)

This pic recently fell into my hands and as I get so many requests about any recent images of Jock this is the best you are ever going to get! He is never seen in public.

(To protect some younger family members I have altered them out of the picture. Click the image for a larger view. )

JOCK ROSS AND HIS MISSUS VANESSA “NESS” ROSS Visit the COMANCHERO MEMORIAL UP THE COAST AT Palmdale Memorial Park and Crematorium. To protect some younger family members I have altered them out of the picture

JOCK ROSS AND HIS MISSUS VANESSA “NESS” ROSS Visit the COMANCHERO MEMORIAL UP THE COAST AT Palmdale Memorial Park and Crematorium. To protect some younger family members I have altered them out of the picture

The massacre had its beginnings after a group of Comancheros broke away and formed the first Bandidos Motorcycle Club chapter in Australia. This resulted in intense rivalry between the two chapters.

An advertised “British motorcycle swap meet” was placed in a few local press releases, at the Viking Tavern, with a scheduled start at 10 a.m. on Sunday, September 2, 1984.

On Sunday September 2, 1984 around 1 pm, a heavily armed group of Comancheros entered the carpark of the Viking Tavern during the motorcycle part swap meet with 30 similarly armed Bandidos arriving soon after with a back-up van carrying weapons following close behind. Both sides proceeded to line up at opposite ends of the car park. William George “Jock” Ross, who had founded the Comancheros in 1968, signalled by waving a machete in the air and the two clubs charged at each other.

Police responded after receiving reports that “a man” had gone berserk with a rifle at the Viking Tavern in Milperra and “a few shots” had been fired. The first of more than 200 police began arriving but the fighting continued for another 10 minutes before they were able to stop it. Four Comancheros died from shotgun wounds, two Bandidos died after being shot with a Rossi .357 magnum rifle and a 14-year-old bystander, Leanne Walters, also died after being hit in the face by a stray .357 bullet. A further 28 people were wounded with 20 requiring hospitalisation.

Mark Pennington, one of the first policemen on the scene, was later awarded $380,000 compensation for psychological damage.

6 BIKIE CLUB MEMBERS WERE KILLED THAT DAY…4 FROM THE COMANCHEROS, 2 FROM THE BANDIDOS AND ONE MEMBER OF THE PUBLIC, TEENAGER LEANNE WALTERS

COMANCHEROS

  • Andy:  Andrew Thomas
  • Blowave: John Bodt
  • Bones: Scott Dive
  • Chewy: Rick Lorenz
  • Dog: Tony McCoy “Dog” was shot with two blasts to his upper right chest and face. He was hit with such force it was estimated he was dead before he hit the ground.
  • Foghorn; Foggy: Robert Lane “Foggy” was shot in the centre of the chest with a .357 magnum “Rossi” rifle. He remained where he fell and died almost instantly.
  • Glen: Glen Eaves
  • JJ: Robert Heeney
  • Jock: William Ross
  • Kraut: Kevork Tomasian
  • Leroy: Phillip Jeschke “Leroy” Was the Comanchero’s “Sergeant At Arms” and was a “hit” target. He was shot with the .357 magnum “Rossi” rifle and died instantly. Entry and exit wound indicate “Leroy” was crouching over and was shot in the back.
  • Littlejohn: John Hennessey
  • Morts: James Morton
  • Pee Wee: Garry Annakin
  • Snow: Ian White
  • Sparrow, Sparra: Ivan Romcek “Sparrow” was shot with one round of a shotgun and was shot at such close range that the cartridge wadding can be clearly seen embedded in his right ear. He died instantly with a baseball bat under his body
  • Sunshine: Raymond Kucler
  • Terry: Terrence Parker
  • Tonka: Michael O’keefe

BANDIDIOS

  • Bear: Stephen Roberts
  • Bernie: Bernard Podgorski
  • Big Tony: Tony Cain
  • Bull: Phillip Campbell
  • Caesar: Colin Campbell
  • Charlie: Charlie Sciberras
  • Chopper: Mario Cianter “Chopper” was shot with two blasts of a shotgun to his chest and died instantly.
  • Davo: William Littlewood
  • Dukes: Greg McEiwaine
  • Gloves: Mark McElwaine
  • Hookie: Steve Owens
  • Junior. Mark Shorthall
  • Kid Rotten: Lance Purdie
  • Knuckles: Phillip McEiwaine
  • Lance: Lance Wellington
  • Lard: Tony Melville
  • Lout: Rick Harris
  • Lovie: lewis Cooper
  • Opey: Stephen Cowan
  • Peter: Peter Melvine
  • Pig: Grant Everest
  • Ray: Ray Denholm
  • Roach: James Posar
  • Roo: Rua Rophia
  • Shadow: Gregory Campbell “Shadow” was shot in the throat by a shotgun and died instantly. Ironically, because of the number of charges this man’s own brother was charged with the murder.
  • Snake: Geoff Campbell
  • Snodgrass, Snoddy: Anthony Mark Spencer
  • Sparksy: Gerard Parkes
  • Steve: Steve Hails
  • Tiny: Graeme Wilkinson
  • Tom: Tom Denholm
  • Val: Vlado Grahovac
  • Whack: John Campbell
  • Zorba: George Kouratoras

Bikie wars: Jacques Teamo shot at Robina – Updates on Finks bikie Mark James Graham


update 03/05/12

AN ACCUSED bikie gunman – with tattoos spelling ‘carnage’ and ‘revenge’ on his face – has appeared in a Gold Coast court amid massive security.

Scores of uniformed and plain-clothes police surrounded Southport Magistrates Court for the appearance of Finks bikie Mark James Graham.

Bikie gunman Mark James Graham is escorted by police officers into Queensland on Wednesday.

Graham, 26, faced court on a string of charges over last Saturday’s double shooting at Robina Town Centre.

Senior Bandido’s bikie Jacques Teamo and a woman bystander were shot when Graham allegedly opened fire in the packed shopping centre.

Graham was arrested in Melbourne on Monday night and extradited to Queensland on a police jet.

With fears the Southeast Queensland’s bloody bikie war could escalate further, police were taking no chances today.

There was a large police presence at Southport Court for the appearance of a man accused of shooting a bikie.

Police including officers from the elite Special Emergency Response Team massed at the courthouse.

People going into the court were stopped, questioned and in some cases searched.

A heavily-tattooed Graham displayed no emotion as he sat handcuffed in the dock with a posse of police standing guard and SERT officers watching closely from the front row.

Six officers stood guard over Graham in dock.

He was formally charged with attempted murder, unlawful wounding, acts intended to cause grievous bodily harm, possess a weapon, discharge weapon in public place and dangerous conduct with a weapon.

Police prosecutor Peta Eyschen asked for Graham’s image be suppressed from media publication for 72 hours.

Magistrate John Costanzo asked for justification for making such an order.

Sergeant Eyschen replied that identification of the shooter would be central to the case and police did not want evidence to be “tainted”.

She said Graham’s image should also be suppressed “in the interests of justice” for him and his family.

Mr Costanzo asked for legal precedents and the case was briefly adjourned.

Sgt Eyschen returned to withdraw the application.

Mr Costanzo remanded Graham in custody to re-appear on June 13 by video link from jail.

update 01/05/12 SHOOTER CAUGHT 8.20 PM LAST NIGHT IN MELBOURNE

HEAVILY-armed police have arrested a Victorian man over a Queensland bikie shooting which wounded two people, including an innocent woman.

Officers from the Operations Group and detectives from bikie taskforce Echo swooped on Mark James Graham in Melton about 8.20pm yesterday.

The 26-year-old Keilor man was remanded in custody at an out-of-sessions hearing.

He will face the Melbourne Magistrates’ Court later this morning.

A Queensland police taskforce into the wave of bikie violence had been unable to identify the heavily-tattooed man who allegedly opened fire on a rival in a packed Gold Coast shopping centre on Saturday.

Forty-two-year-old Jacques Teamo, who is linked to a bikie gang, was shot in the arm and a 53-year-old woman was caught in the crossfire in the shooting at Robina Town Centre.

Detectives from Queensland are expected to travel to Victoria to apply for Graham’s extradition.

Officers from Victoria Police, Queensland Police and the Australian Federal Police were involved in a joint investigation which led to his arrest.

UPDATE 29/04/12 5PM SUSPECT SOUGHT-PICTURES

POLICE have released images of the man wanted over the double shooting at Robina Town Centre yesterday.

It is alleged he was shot in the arm and the woman in the buttocks. Both were in a stable condition last night.

Investigators are looking for a man who has been described as being of either Pacific Islander or possibly Middle Eastern appearance.

He is approximately 180cms tall with a muscular build and has heavily tattooed on both arms, neck and face.

Three of the images depict a man with a black jumper and two of the images depict the same man with a white shirt.

VICTIM: A file picture of Jacques Teamo, the Bandidos motorcycle gang member reportedly shot at Robina Town Centre on the Gold Coast

A woman, 53, was shot in the crossfire as a heavily tattooed bikie opened fire on a rival gang member, believed to be Jacques Teamo, at the packed Robina Town Centre.

Police confirmed the male victim was aged 43.

It is alleged he was shot in the arm and the woman in the buttocks. Both were in a stable condition last night.

Hundreds of shoppers ran for their lives while shopkeepers closed stores and cowered behind counters with customers as shots rang out outside a phone shop near the centre’s busy food court and cinema complex.

Man and woman shot at Robina Town Centre

Bikie Inc – Organised crime on the Gold Coast

Bikie’s wedding on rival clubs’ warpath

“I heard a massive bang and turned around and saw the gunman with his hand out and he went ‘bang, bang’,” said one young male witness, too frightened to be named.

“I ducked down and grabbed my girlfriend and ran. We saw the guy who got shot – another big bikie guy had been shot straight through his arm.”

The witness said the bleeding bikie started walking away with a young child who appeared to be his son.

“The guy who shot him just casually walked out and went down the escalator, just like nothing happened,” he said.

Witnesses said both bikies were covered in tattoos.

Hayley Crowe, who works in a shop metres from the shooting, said she heard the gunshots and saw shoppers screaming and running.

“There were people running into our shop,” she said.

“Pretty much everyone locked themselves in our back room and closed the door.

“We were pretty scared. It’s not something that happens on your average Saturday afternoon at Robina.”

English tourist Jason Chambers was heading to the food court with his girlfriend.

“I don’t want to say it was like something out of a gangster movie but that’s exactly what it was like,” he said.

“I didn’t think this kind of thing happened in Australia.”

Tweed Heads woman Aimee Tilton said she scooped up her two children, aged 5 and 2, and ran into a card shop to hide.

“My first thought was obviously my kids so I just grabbed them and ran into Kenny’s Cardiology and jumped behind the counter,” she said.

Dozens of police swarmed on the centre and cordoned off a blood-spattered first-floor thoroughfare, which only minutes earlier had been crowded.

Shoppers said they were shocked and angry the bikies were now waging war in public places where innocent people could get hurt.

“It’s completely ridiculous,” one man said.

Why don’t they just take their feuding and violence somewhere else where nobody can be killed?”

Police Inspector Bruce Kuhn said the gunman was still at large but did not believe he was a public threat.

“At this stage we don’t believe there’s a threat to any other person,” he said.

He would not confirm a link to Tuesday’s drive-by shooting at the Bandido-owned East Coast Ink tattoo shop at Mermaid Beach but said investigations continued.

Insp Kuhn said it was fortunate more people were not injured. “It is a very busy shopping centre and there were a lot of people in the vicinity,” he said.

Queensland Police Commissioner Bob Atkinson yesterday said the bikie war was the worst he had ever seen in Queensland, while Police Minister Jack Dempsey said the Government would crack down on illegal firearms, imposing harsher penalties.

Mr Dempsey said the Government would look at laws specifically focusing on outlaw motorcycle gangs. “We’ll be looking at all laws to ensure that these illegal groups are not feeling comfortable in their beds and in their homes,” he said.

The gunman was described as being of Islander appearance, 180cm tall, of muscular build, with full neck tattoo.

Call Crime Stoppers on 1800 333 000 with any information on the incident.

Toby Mitchell shooting- “Prisoners on War” Jail Gang link-UPDATES


UPDATE 12/03/15

Such a shame, apparently everyone says Toby is a top guy (when they are within a foot of him) The truth is he is a long time crim, a thug, an enforcer of sorts who is happy to Delegate his tasks to others. he happened to have a stack of enemies inside and out of jail. No wonder he was keen for bail.

Ex-Bandido bikie Toby Mitchell denied bail over alleged South Melbourne assault

Former bikie enforcer Toby Mitchell has again been refused bail by a Supreme Court judge over allegedly assaulting and threatening to kill a man and his baby daughter.

Mitchell allegedly attacked the man, who cannot be named for legal reasons, at a South Melbourne Cafe in January after he refused to lend Mitchell $300,000.

Police allege the victim took his three-month-old daughter to the meeting as protection.

The court heard Mitchell allegedly responded by punching the man in the face, jabbing him with a gun and threatening to kill both him and his daughter.

He was denied bail in January but reapplied.

Mitchell’s lawyer told the court no one else had witnessed it and argued he should not disqualified from bail because of his history. mmmm

During the bail application hearing, Justice Betty King questioned whether she could impose bail conditions on Mitchell, because he had admitted to punching the man in public and shown contempt for the law.

Justice King also found he was an unacceptable risk of interfering with witnesses.

A former member of outlaw motorcycle gang the Bandidos, the 40-year-old was shot several times outside a Brunswick gym in 2011 and lost a kidney.

AN underworld criminal linked with powerful jail gang Prisoners of War is being investigated over the public shooting of bikie enforcer Toby Mitchell.

Danielle McGuire outside Royal Melbourne Hospital on Friday, as were several Bandidos members. Inset: Toby Mitchell. (This Image digitally enhanced by the Herald Sun)

The feared jail gang leader and an associate led police on a short chase in the city on Thursday before being arrested with a pistol.

The gun was found under the front seat of a luxury car that was being driven the wrong way up tram tracks on Collins St.

The gun was not the same firearm used to blast up to six bullets at Mitchell – the Bandidos sergeant-at-arms – near a supermarket carpark in Brunswick three days earlier.

Police also found what they believe to be a gym floor plan in the car.

Mitchell was shot outside Doherty’s Gym while talking to owner Tony Doherty.

Following the city arrests, police conducted further raids in Skye and Mill Park.

Detectives initially denied there was a link between the city arrests and the Mitchell shooting.

Toby Mitchell lost a kidney and part of his liver after being shot multiple times in Brunswick

Mitchell has refused to make a statement to police from his hospital bed and investigators have chosen not to release CCTV footage from Bandidos security cameras outside their Weston St clubhouse, next to the gym.

Mitchell was repeatedly shot as he ran from his attackers and has had surgery to remove a kidney.

It is believed he was placed in an induced coma at the weekend and has also lost part of his liver.

Sources have told the Herald Sun that Mitchell was shot up to five times.

The daylight shooting in front of schoolchildren and shoppers has the potential to escalate into a deadly war between organised crime figures and outlaw bikies.

It is believed the Mitchell shooting is related to a planned hit on his predecessor as Bandidos sergeant-at-arms, Lee Undy.

Undy was jailed for 22 months last month over firearm offences, leaving Mitchell to take over his enforcer position at the club.

A feud, which has led to heavy-handed treatment of underworld figures by Undy and Mitchell over drugs, is believed to be at the centre of the conflict.

Undy, who drives a Ferrari and has a tattoo “FTW” (f— the world), on his face, was a regular visitor to Thailand and Dubai.

The court heard last month Undy was arming himself after police warned him of the threat to his life.

One of the theories to emerge about the Mitchell hit was that it was ordered by a player in Melbourne’s drug trade.

Another is that an underworld figure’s arms were broken by Bandidos.

It was also claimed that Roberta Williams’ fiance Rob Carpenter had been bashed by club members.

In other developments:

POLICE know where the Ford Territory used by the gunmen was stolen from.

A GANGLAND figure photographed at the funeral of Williams’ henchman Benji Veniamin, who is a King St regular, had his arms broken by members of a bikie gang.

LEADING bikie figures have been to Asia helping set up new chapters.

 

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