Indonesia gives approval for Aussies, Andrew Chan and Myuran Sukumaran’s transfer from prison to be executed

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Updated about an hour agoFri 13 Feb 2015, 10:38am

Indonesian authorities have approved the transfer of two convicted Australian drug smugglers from their Bali prison, in preparation for execution.

The head of the Bali prosecutor’s office, Momock Bambang Samirso, confirmed he received permission from the Justice and Human Rights Ministry on Wednesday night to transfer Andrew Chan and Myuran Sukumaran out of Kerobokan prison, so they can be taken away for execution.

There will be a meeting today to discuss the final logistics and then coordinate with other prisons to have the men relocated.

Mr Momock said the execution would be done as soon as possible.

“The permit to transfer the prisoners has been received. We are going to transfer [them] and conduct execution as soon as possible,” Mr Momock said.

“We’re not delaying execution … the attorney-general’s office asked to do it as soon as possible.”

He has said the families of the two men would be notified before the transfer goes ahead, giving them the opportunity to visit for the last time.

“We will inform the families and inmates a few days before the transfer,” Mr Momock said.

The ABC understands officials have already been speaking to airport authorities and the national carrier Garuda Indonesia, which has apparently agreed to be involved in flying the two men to where the executions will take place.

The pair is likely to be flown to Yogyakarta and then driven about five hours to Cilacap in Central Java province near Nusakambangan Island, home to a high-security prison.

Indonesian attorney-general Muhammad Prasetyo will make the official announcement that the executions are to go ahead three days beforehand.

The two men, the ringleaders of the so-called Bali Nine group of heroin smugglers, have been denied presidential pardons and are due to face a firing squad this month.

Indonesian president Joko Widodo, who has a policy of denying clemency for all drug offenders, said he had rejected 64 bids for clemency and was not forgiving any drug criminal.

But lawyers for Chan and Sukumaran are still attempting to appeal the president’s decision to refuse them clemency without considering their cases.

An appeal was filed in the State Administrative Court in East Jakarta on Wednesday in the hope of forcing Mr Widodo to reconsider the cases individually.

Julie Bishop and Tanya Plibersek call for stay of execution

In a show of unity, Foreign Affairs Minister Julie Bishop moved a motion in Parliament, seconded by Opposition counterpart Tanya Plibersek, calling for a stay of execution for the two men.

Ms Bishop said the Government would continue to make representations in an effort to save the pair’s lives.

“Over 55 personal representations at Ministerial and Prime Ministerial level have been made,” she said.

“High-profile Australian officials and members of the business community have made discreet overtures to their influential Indonesian contacts.

“Our officials in Jakarta have made – and are continuing to make – respectful, tireless and targeted diplomatic representations at the highest levels.”

However, Indonesia’s foreign minister Retno Marsudi said she had explained the Indonesian government’s stance on executing drug smugglers to Ms Bishop.

“I told Julie that this is not against a country, this is not against a national of a certain country but this is against crime, it’s against an extraordinary crime,” she said.

Last month Indonesia executed six people, including five foreigners, for drug offences.

Melissa Parke renews her plea for pair to be spared

Federal Labor MP Melissa Parke has also renewed her plea for Chan and Sukumaran to be spared from execution.

“These young men are rehabilitated and reformed, they’re helping others every day, they could be a vital part of Indonesia’s campaign to educate young people about the dangers of drugs,” she said.

“We honour the wonderful human beings that they have become and we’re very hopeful about the things that they can still do in their lives and we send them our love, our hope and our courage.”

The former United Nations lawyer said the pair’s good behaviour should provide a legal basis for a stay of execution.

“Indonesia’s own constitutional court has not only concluded – based on a huge amount of evidence – that the death penalty is not a deterrent, but it has also recommended that the death penalty should be able to be amended where a prisoner demonstrates good behaviour for 10 years,” she said.

Ms Parke also criticised the Australian Federal Police for alerting Indonesian officials to the Bali Nine in the first place.

“That was a terrible mistake, AFP guidelines have been amended now and I think that we would all hope that that would never happen again,” she said.

Ms Parke has written a letter signed by 111 federal MPs to the Indonesian Government asking for men’s death sentences to be lifted.

Chief Government whip Philip Ruddock, Chief Opposition whip Chris Hayes, and Greens leader Senator Christine Milne were among the co-signatories.

Casey Anthony Murder Trial- Live Feed to trial


UPDATE 05/07/11  8 Weeks and finally the jury has gone into deliberations in this case. Closing statements are over, 100’s of pieces of evidence, just short of 100 witnesses and plenty of Barneys with the State and defence going at each other. So 3 years after little Caylee went missing and her little bones were found in swampland near here home, we have the jury in deciding the outcome. I pray to god this disgusting excuse for a mother gets the death Penalty, the very same one she gave her little girl so she could go out and party party party.

State Ends Arguments, Casey Jury To Be Instructed

July 4, 2011

ORANGE COUNTY, Fla. — The state ended its closing arguments in Casey Anthony’s murder trial on Monday, and the jury will be instructed by the judge on the seven separate charges Casey faces, including first-degree murder.

Prosecutors in the Casey Anthony murder trial told jurors they kept their promises, alluding to defence claims that never materialized.

Prosecutors also said it is “absurd” to think her 2-year-old daughter drowned or that Casey’s father, George Anthony, covered up Caylee Marie Anthony‘s death to make it look like murder.

Monday marks day 46, including jury selection, in Casey’s trial. She’s accused of killing Caylee.

Casey entered the courtroom just before 8:30 a.m. on Monday, wearing a blue and white striped shirt and dark pants. She had her hair pulled back in a bun. Casey’s parents, Cindy and George Anthony were also present.

The state was trying to persuade the jury that their forensic evidence was strong, countering the defence accusation that it was based on “fantasy.”

Prosecutor Jeff Ashton told the jurors during his rebuttal closing argument that no one makes an innocent accident look like a murder. The defence contends that Caylee drowned in the family’s pool and when Casey panicked, George, a former police officer, decided to make the death look like a homicide by placing duct tape over Caylee’s mouth and dumping her body in some nearby woods. George Anthony has denied that.

“That’s absurd. Nothing has been presented to you to make that any less absurd,” Ashton said.

Ashton also spent significant time reminding the jurors about the forensic evidence that he says links Casey to her daughter’s death, including the smell and chemical signature of decomposition in her car.

After a short recess, it was lead prosecutor Linda Drane-Burdick’s turn. Drane-Burdick told the jurors during the rebuttal closing argument that she and her colleagues backed up every claim they made in their opening statement six weeks ago. Without saying it, she was pointing out to the jury that the defence never directly backed up its opening statement claim that Caylee drowned and that Anthony’s father made the death look like a murder.

The jurors, who were chosen from the Tampa Bay area and sequestered in an Orlando hotel, will then begin their deliberations and decide which portrait of 25-year-old Casey Anthony to believe.

The state contends Casey was a party girl who killed Caylee because the toddler got in the way of her love life.

“Something needed to be sacrificed, that something was either the life she wanted or the life thrust upon her. She chose to sacrifice her child,” Ashton said during his original 90-minute argument Sunday.

Her attorneys contend that after Caylee drowned, her troubled mother’s lies and erratic behaviour were brought on by sexual abuse she suffered as a child from her father. George Anthony also denies that allegation. Judge Belvin Perry has ruled that no evidence of such abuse has been presented and struck it from closing arguments.

Defense attorney Jose Baez said during his closing argument on Sunday that the prosecutors’ case was so weak they tried to portray Casey as “a lying, no-good slut” and that their forensic evidence was based on a “fantasy.” He said Caylee’s death was “an accident that snowballed out of control.” Baez began his closing argument Sunday with his biggest question: How did Caylee die? Neither prosecutors nor the defence have offered firm proof.

He attacked the prosecution’s forensic evidence. He said air analysis of the trunk of Casey’s car, which allegedly showed air molecules consistent with decomposition, could not be duplicated. No one could prove a stain found in the trunk was caused by Caylee’s body decomposing there. And witnesses showed maggots found in the trunk came from a bag of trash that was found there, he said.

“They throw enough against the wall and see what sticks. That is what they’re doing … right down to the cause of death,” Baez said. He conceded his client had told elaborate lies and invented imaginary friends and even a fake father for Caylee, but he said that doesn’t mean she killed her daughter.

Baez also attacked George as unreliable. He said a suicide note that George wrote in January 2009 that claimed no knowledge of what happened to Caylee was self-serving and the attempt was a fraud. He said George claimed he was going to kill himself with a six-pack of beer and some high-blood pressure medicine.

Ashton, the prosecutor, began his closing argument Sunday by showing a video of Casey playing with Caylee, causing Casey to apparently choke back tears. But she quickly regained her composure.

He said Caylee’s death wasn’t an accident because three pieces of duct tape were placed on her face — one on the mouth, one on the nose and one over those to be “thorough.”

He then told the jury that Casey worried Caylee was getting to the age where she would have told Casey’s parents the woman was spending her days and nights with her boyfriend — not going to work and leaving Caylee with a nanny.

“Casey is very bright,” Ashton said. “Her lies are very detailed. … But when Casey wants to do what Casey wants to do, she finds a way.”

The prosecutor then described the lies Casey told her parents, George and Cindy, about why she couldn’t produce Caylee after the toddler was last seen June 16, 2008: that she was with a nanny named Zenaida Gonzalez (Zanny), a woman who doesn’t exist; that Casey and her daughter were spending time in Jacksonville with a rich boyfriend who doesn’t exist; and that Zanny had been hospitalized after an out-of-town traffic accident and that they were spending time with her.

The lies only fell apart, Ashton said, a month later when a junkyard employee told George and Cindy their daughter’s car had been towed. When they picked it up, they discovered a foul odour. George y and the tow yard operator said it smelled like human decomposition.

Cindy then tracked down her daughter. When she couldn’t produce Caylee, her parents called police. Casey then told investigators she worked at Universal Studios theme park as an event planner. She went so far as to take them there, talk her way past security into an office building. She gave up the lie as she was walking down the hall.

After the state is done with its rebuttal Monday, about an hour of jury instructions is expected before deliberations begin.

Casey is charged with first-degree murder, aggravated child abuse, aggravated manslaughter of a child and four counts of lying to law enforcement. The child abuse and manslaughter charges each carry a 30-year prison term if convicted.

Casey has pleaded not guilty to first-degree murder in Caylee’s death and could face the death penalty if convicted of that charge.

Re Casey Anthony Trial If anybody wants to chat online about this case during the night I started a chatroom here http://www.chatzy.com/579050344752 while we watch the trial.Come join me there

I just put together a couple of images so you can tell who is where if you come on and watch this trial live each night.

UPDATE well I have been up late at night to the detriment of my family and obligations but this LIVE TO AIR case in intriguing and every day brings a surprise or 5…But this one has to take the cake. Casey’s mum Cindy has done a few flips in this case because she is torn between her only daughter and the grand daughter in question. BUT to lie outright against earlier testimony reeks…She was made a fool of by the state, because what she had to say went against all known depositions etc etc she had given.Now sure save your daughters death penalty but when the time comes….stick to the facts in court…All she has done is discredit herself in front of millions…

Cindy Anthony’s testimony on Thursday directly contradicted prosecutors’ theory that Casey was the one who made the Internet searches.

Chloroform is a chemical compound that can be used to knock someone unconscious and also is found in human decomposition.

She said she started searching chlorophyll, but Google sent her elsewhere. Her attorney said she’s telling the truth and not just trying to protect Casey.

“She testified as truthfully today as she did when she testified for the state of Florida,” said attorney Mark Lippman.

Lippman said Cindy Anthony’s memory is now better because of medication, and now she remembers being home from work on the day “chloroform” was Goggled.

Cindy’s work records indicate she was at work, and prosecutors asked her to read aloud a question from an earlier deposition on the same subject, chloroform searches.

But prosecutors quickly focused on earlier depositions when Cindy denied searching for chloroform.

“Do you recall denying looking up chloroform?” asked prosecutor Linda Drane-Burdick.

“I didn’t look up how to make chloroform, I looked up chloroform,” said Cindy Anthony.

Prosecutors say someone in the Anthony home ran searches on chloroform as many as 84 times.

And prosecutors pointed out that Cindy did not use the website MySpace, while Casey did, and that website was accessed within seconds of one of the chloroform searches.

“If there’s a search for chloroform, then 15-20 seconds later it hit on MySpace, likely it’s Casey as opposed to Cindy,” said Sheaffer.

Other terms that were searched, Cindy could not explain.

Cindy Anthony told prosecutors that she did not run searches on household weapons, chloroform habit or neck-breaking, although she said she remembered a YouTube video involving a skateboarder, whose trick was described as a “neck-breaking feat.”

Prosecutors also asked if the Anthony’s computer was password protected, Cindy said no, but a computer expert then testified that it was and that the searches were done with Casey’s username.

Earlier in the trial, a medical examiner testified that even a small amount of chloroform would be sufficient to cause a child’s death.

Cindy Anthony also said stains in the trunk of Casey’s car were present when the family bought the car in 2000.

The state contends Casey used pieces of duct tape to suffocate her child. The defense says the toddler drowned in her grandparents’ swimming pool.

Casey is charged with first-degree murder, aggravated child abuse, aggravated manslaughter of a child and four counts of lying to law enforcement. She has pleaded not guilty and faces the death penalty if convicted.

View from Casey Anthonys table

View from the public gallery to judge

Well I have just spent all night watching the LIVE feed of the Criminal Trial of Casey Anthony in Orlando Florida . She is on trial for the Murder of her daughter Caylee in 2008. The prosecution have sought the DEATH PENALTY if convicted.

I have followed this case since the beginning and to me personally I find it riveting to be actually in the court room as it happens and I feel all major trials should be conducted this way. I will post some background info on this case below, but any true crime lover will be well aware of this case, which has become one of the biggest most protracted murder cases over there for a long time. It was the second day of the trial since the jury has been sworn in.It is expected to run for 4 to 6 weeks. If you are a crime lover and night owl like me, it makes for fascinating viewing. The best link to everything concerned with the case is here. The live feed and blog starts about 11pm AEST (Where all evidence, transcripts, video etc  including a live video feed each day as well as audio can be found!)

Casey Anthony enters court 25th May 2011

Casey Marie Anthony  was the mother of Caylee Anthony. She has been charged with the first degree murder of her daughter, Caylee.

She was first arrested on July 16, 2008, for giving false statements, neglect of a child, and obstruction of a criminal investigation with a request that she be held on a no bond status until Caylee Anthony was located.

On August 21, 2008, Casey Anthony was released after one month of incarceration. She was released from the Orange County jail after her $500,200 bond was posted by California bail bondsman Leonard Padilla.

She was arrested again on August 29, 2008, on charges of forgery, fraudulent use of personal information, and petty theft for forging $700 worth of checks and using her friend’s credit cards without permission. Leonard Padilla subsequently rescinded the $500,200 in bail due to a lack of cooperation from Casey Anthony.

On September 5, 2008, Casey Anthony was released again on bail after being fitted with an electronic tracking device. Her $500,000 bond was posted anonymously, and it was later revealed that her parents, Cindy and George Anthony, signed a promissory note for the bond.

Caylee Anthony's remains were found Dec. 11, 2008 less than a mile from her home.

On October 14, 2008, Casey Anthony was indicted by a grand jury on charges of first-degree murder. The Florida state attorney’s office in April 2009 announced that it intended to seek the death penalty.

Jury selection began May 9, 2011, at the Pinellas County Criminal Justice Centre in Clearwater, Florida, because the case has been so widely reported in the Orlando area. Jurors will be brought from Pinellas County to Orlando where they will be sequestered during the trial, which is expected to last between six and eight weeks.  The trial was originally scheduled to begin May 17, 2011; however, jury selection took much longer than expected and ended on May 20, 2011, with twelve jurors and five alternates being sworn in.

The trial began on May 24, 2011, at the Orange County Courthouse, with Judge Belvin Perry presiding. In the opening statements, prosecutor Linda Drane Burdick described the story of the disappearance of Caylee Anthony day-by-day. The defence, led by Jose Baez, presented its claim that Caylee drowned accidentally in the family’s pool on June 16, 2008, and was found by George Anthony, who then covered up Caylee’s death. Baez also shocked those in the courtroom when he alleged that George Anthony had sexually abused Casey since she was 8 years old. Baez also claimed that Casey’s brother Lee had made sexual advances toward Casey and was even given a paternity test to see if he was Caylee’s father.

According to a jail source, Casey spends her days reading the Bible and writing letters. She is housed in a 12 X 7-foot cell in the Protective Custody wing of the Orange County jail, only emerging to take a shower and exercise. She has weekly meetings with her lawyers and apparently has had no visitors since 2008. Florida law states that all inmate visits and phone calls are videotaped and are public records.

On May 20, 2011, at the Pinellas County Criminal Justice Centre in Clearwater, Florida, a jury of twelve jurors and five alternates were sworn in and will ultimately decide the guilt and the fate of Casey Anthony. The panel contains nine women and eight men. The jurors are to be sequestered in Orange County for the trial, which started on May 24. It has been estimated that the trial will take anywhere from 7 to 10 weeks, during which the jury will be closely supervised and away from their homes, family, friends, and media outlets. On May 24, in the Orange County Courthouse in Orlando, Florida, opening statements were presented.

"Never To Be Released" 4 By Paul B Kidd


Never To Be Released 4

Never To Be Released 4

To be sent to jail with papers marked ‘never to be released’ is the ultimate punishment in the Australian judicial system. There is no death penalty. ‘Never to be released’ is reserved for the worst of the worst.

And, except for two cases – which are included in this book – these days ‘never-to-be-released’ means exactly that. The only way out is in a black rubber bag with a zipper up the middle, having died either by misfortune, suicide or old age.
In this, his fourth book in the series, Paul B. Kidd, Australia’s serial killer and ‘never to be released’ authority, includes more cases that are the most evil of the evil, where the perpetrators have been sent to prison without the possibility of parole – ‘never to be released’.

Paul B. Kidd Paul B. Kidd is a broadcaster on 2UE, Sydney, where he co-hosts one of the most popular segments on Australian radio, ‘Crime File’, with George Moore.

Paul is the author of ten books on Australian true crime and is a recognised authority on Australia’s serial killers, major criminal cases and never to be released lifers.

Click on the cover images below for more information or to purchase Paul B. Kidd titles.

Celluloid Serial KillersThe Australian Crime FileThe Australian Crime File 2Till Death Do Us Part

“Never To Be Released” 4 By Paul B Kidd


Never To Be Released 4

Never To Be Released 4

To be sent to jail with papers marked ‘never to be released’ is the ultimate punishment in the Australian judicial system. There is no death penalty. ‘Never to be released’ is reserved for the worst of the worst.

And, except for two cases – which are included in this book – these days ‘never-to-be-released’ means exactly that. The only way out is in a black rubber bag with a zipper up the middle, having died either by misfortune, suicide or old age.
In this, his fourth book in the series, Paul B. Kidd, Australia’s serial killer and ‘never to be released’ authority, includes more cases that are the most evil of the evil, where the perpetrators have been sent to prison without the possibility of parole – ‘never to be released’.

Paul B. Kidd Paul B. Kidd is a broadcaster on 2UE, Sydney, where he co-hosts one of the most popular segments on Australian radio, ‘Crime File’, with George Moore.

Paul is the author of ten books on Australian true crime and is a recognised authority on Australia’s serial killers, major criminal cases and never to be released lifers.

Click on the cover images below for more information or to purchase Paul B. Kidd titles.

Celluloid Serial KillersThe Australian Crime FileThe Australian Crime File 2Till Death Do Us Part