Who wants to be a unpaid crime blog reporter/contributer?


Not real journo’s who still have a job, maybe cadets (but not good for resume…mmm)

Maybe old school scribes who wish they could stay in the game!

How about folks like me with no relevant qualifications but gives a toss about the crimes in their communities?

The pay-off is a verdict like today GBC cowardly wife killer.

People like me? You relate to how I write?

Hey cant spell well, 2 finger typer…So am I YES…Our stuff gets checked before we post.

Sounds like you?

GOOD keep reading

This site has had massive coverage lately (I cover non famous crimes too)

I’m thinking along the lines of a Co-ordinator in each state

That co-ordinator runs that states crimes and has authors who get the stories up.

What do you think?

Sound good, bad, troublesome, confusing?

All I want is to give the best coverage of what is going on in our communities.

The community expectations has/have?  outgrown my skills honestly…

Each state, minimum deserves better coverage. The good people email me why haven’t you covered this rape, or that kidnapping, or the death of a cousin in my indigenous community.

You could help us!

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Is it the end for sites like Aussiecriminals


I have to ask that question after being harassed by the legal folks at the Courier Mail demanding I take down all the articles and photographs that I use here, at this point about GBC trial. (I had already removed the pics over last 4 days)

Articles and photographs are owned by them and I am stealing basically so we can dissect and discuss this case and others. They say I can post links only to their site?????

I am sure there are millions of pages from newspapers published in another format or whatever on people’s blogs for non commercial reasons.

But they have come after me. Interesting that…

Here is the email I received this afternoon, I have 1 day to reply. What do we do? I am devastated at the moment but wanted to share it with you guys.

Dear Rob,

Thank you for your email explaining your situation.  I am sorry to hear about your injury.  However, it is good that you have found something that you are clearly passionate about, and a community of people with similar interests.

As I am sure you will appreciate, the Courier Mail team is equally passionate about what we do.  We have dedicated court reporters who cover criminal trials day in, day out under enormous pressure to write stories accurately and quickly.  We also have photographers who travel extensively, editors working into the night and lawyers like myself who ensure our coverage is not defamatory or in contempt of court.  So you can imagine our team’s disappointment when our hard work is taken by other people and copied.

Your website is infringing our copyright in our articles and photographs.  Just because we publish our work on the internet does not mean everyone can take it and use it as their own.  Attributing the material as being sourced from the Courier Mail does not provide an excuse – it only proves that you have taken the material illegally.    As your website is about people who break the law, I am sure you can see the irony.

We ask that you take down the Courier Mail articles and photographs from your website.  You can, of course, replace them with links to our website at couriermail.com.au.

Please let me know whether you agree by tomorrow.  I have copied this email to your website host, WordPress/Automattic (for the attention of David W.), to keep them informed.

Kind regards,

*********** | Legal Counsel  | News Corp Australia

Level 3, 2 Holt Street, Surry Hills NSW 2010
Direct  *************  Mobile ********  Email *****************@news.com.au

—–Original Message—–
From: Robbo [mailto:aussiecriminals@gmail.com]
Sent: Tuesday, 17 June 2014 1:23 AM
To: ********************
Subject: Re DMCA notice

Hi *************

I am writing to you for 2 reasons.One is for understanding the other is what can we do as a community of crime lovers do so this does not happen again.

I started  this website called aussiecriminals.com.au about 4 years ago because as a community we never got to have a say about crimes happening in our community.

I am a one man show unpaid normal guy. After falling off a roof at work and recovering I found something to o.Talk about crime.That is all we do.We are non commercial all we do is talk about cases.

How else can we discuss cases when the newspapers/media are the only ones we get info from. I only share stuff on the net and try to give credit to the sources like yourselves.

Your actions would devastate hundreds if not thousands of folks in our community who were touched by the baden clay case.

I sincerely ask in the first instance you remove the threat to our site and then we can discuss what to do about it.

This site has been my only outlet since injuring my back.

Sincerely

Rob

Harley Hicks-baby killer gets life


Harley Hicks trial: day by day

GALLERY: The Harley Hicks trial

Sentence will never end family’s pain: A look back and the trial and what couldn’t be told

10am: JUSTICE Stephen Kaye has begun addressing the Supreme Court as he prepares to deliver his sentence for baby killer Harley Hicks.

10.12am: Justice Kaye said what Hicks did in Zayden’s room when he killed him with considerable violence was clear ‘but what is unclear is why you did it’.

10.16am: Justice Kaye said the full account of the injuries to Zayden was harrowing to say the least.

He said he could only imagine the heartbreak of Zayden’s mother, Casey Veal, and those who loved Zayden.

10.18am: Justice Kaye said Hicks struck the fatal blows because he ‘specifically intended to kill him’.

10.23am: Justice Kaye said Hicks put up an innocent man as a false killer ‘in order to save your skin’.

10.24am: ‘Your offending places this case in the worst cases of murder that come before this court. The life of a baby is particularly special and precious. What you did was totally and utterly evil,’ Justice Kaye said.

10.28am: Justice Kaye said ‘You have shown no remorse for what you have done’.

10.33am: Justice Kaye said ‘At no stage of the trial could I detect from you any sign of remorse’.

Justice Kaye said he observed Hicks during the trial and he showed no indication of any pity for the baby or the family.

10.37am: Justice Kaye says of particular concern was Hicks’ criminal history and escalating violence.

‘There are other victims of your crime who have suffered and continue to suffer,’ Justice Kaye said.

10.40am: The English language is ‘entirely inadequate’ to describe their grief and anguish, Justice Kaye said.

10.41am: Justice Kaye quotes Zayden’s mother’s victim impact statement that says, ‘I miss Zayden each second of each day. Words cannot describe the pain I feel for both my sons.

‘I am serving a life sentence .. all I have is memories and most of them are tainted by this crime.’

Justice Kaye quotes father James Whitting’s impact statement:

‘The tragic and needless loss of my son Zayden devastated us all. I don’t even know where to begin to express the pain in my heart.’

10.43am: Justice Kaye says he quoted the statements to show the ‘indescribable grief and pain as a direct consequence of the crime’.

10.46am: Justice Kaye said Hicks used alcohol and drugs from a young age and methyl amphetamine on a regular basis since 2011.

10.48am: Justice Kaye says Hicks did not always comply with conditions ordering him to get help for his addictions.

10.51am: Justice Kaye said Hicks did not have a psychiatric disorder but his personal history showed he suffered behavioural disorders from an early age, compounded by his family life, sexual abuse and long standing abuse of alcohol and drugs.

10.52am: Justice Kaye says Hicks shows poor prospects for rehabilitation.

10.53am: ‘You are a danger to the community. Especially to the defenceless and vulnerable members of it’, Justice Kaye says.

10.54am: ‘There’s a real need to protect the community from you’, Justice Kaye says.

10.56am: ‘All human life is sacrosanct but the community places special value on the innocent and the lives who are young and vulnerable,’ Justice Kaye says.

11am:  ‘The primary victim of your crime was a helpless defenceless infant,’ but Justice Kaye says he must consider Hicks’ age.

11.01am: Harley Hicks sentenced to life in prison.

11.02am: Harley Hicks sentenced to life in prison with a minimum non-parole period of 32 years.

11.06am: Hicks has been removed from court.

File picture: Harley Hicks.

File picture: Harley Hicks.

Justice Kaye said Hicks ‘unleashed a ferocious attack on Zayden’ that night and the prosecution’s case was very powerful.

Extra security is in place outside the Bendigo court ahead of Harley Hicks' sentencing today. Picture: GLENN DANIELS

Extra security is in place outside the Bendigo court ahead of Harley Hicks’ sentencing today. Picture: GLENN DANIELS

Extra security is in place outside the Bendigo court ahead of Harley Hicks’ sentence today.

Hicks, 21, of Long Gully, was found guilty by a Supreme Court jury in April of murdering Bendigo baby Zayden Veal-Whitting.

Hicks was out committing a series of burglaries overnight on June 14/15, 2012, when he entered Zayden’s Eaglehawk Road home and bludgeoned the 10-month-old to death with a home-made baton.

More to come.

He was just a baby. A tiny, perfect little baby.

A baby growing too quickly into a little boy… but a little boy who was never given the chance to become one.

A little boy who had never celebrated a birthday. Never played in mud puddles or raced to the gate to greet his mum or dad after work.

Harley Hicks taken from court after the jury convicted him of murder in April.Harley Hicks taken from court after the jury convicted him of murder in April.

Read all about the the trial at the Bendigo Advertiser

He had taken his first few steps, but never run his first race. He hadn’t had much time to wrestle his brother, choose a favourite football team or line his parents’ walls with art.

He barely had time to live.

Zayden Veal

Zayden Veal Photo: Supplied

Because on one horrific night in June 2012, a monster entered his home and bludgeoned him to death.

The helpless, beautiful little boy was struck 25 times to the face and at least eight times to the head with a blunt instrument as he lay in his cot. The baby monitor was turned off in the minutes before or after the killing, and his blankets were placed up to his nose before his killer left him to die. He could have already been dead.

Weeks later, that instrument was found to be a home-made baton made of copper wire and electrical tape – and it was covered in the little boy’s DNA.

It was also covered in DNA that matched his killer.

Almost two years after 10-month-old Zayden Veal-Whitting was killed, Harley Hicks will this week be sentenced for his murder.

He is yet to tell the court why he stole the life of a helpless baby – and has shown no remorse for the brutal killing.

On the morning of June 15, 2012, Bendigo woke to a tragedy beyond comprehension.

What started as a report to police of a burglary at an Eaglehawk Road home was quickly followed by a desperate call to paramedics to help revive a child.  As investigators were called to the scene, tongues were already wagging and finding reasons to place blame. But blame in all the wrong areas.

Casey Veal had just found her beautiful little boy beaten to death in his cot. Her then partner Mathew Tisell heard her chilling scream and ran to help.

As Zayden was taken to hospital, police tape was put around his home on Eaglehawk Road. It became a crime scene.

Zayden’s father received a call to go to the hospital. He had no idea why, but the house where Zayden was staying with his mother and then stepfather was on the way. James and his mother Anne drove past the police tape. They had no idea what had taken place. No one did.

It was at the hospital James was told by a social worker she was sorry for the loss of his son. He was lost. Shattered. Confused. James still didn’t know what had happened, or which son had died.

Casey didn’t have the answers, other than what she had woken to find their baby bruised and limp.

Her house had been burgled and their son had been killed.

James knew neither Casey nor Matt were responsible for the death – but who was?

The microscope was on anyone who had any association with the Eaglehawk Road home.

But as the family came together in the hospital to learn the shocking and heartbreaking news, police started receiving reports of a number of burglaries in the Long Gully area on the night of Zayden’s death.

More reports would follow in the next few days.

There were similarities at many, including the burglary at Eaglehawk Road.

That was when police turned their attention to known offenders in the area – and their intelligence turned them to Green Street – the home of Harley Hicks.

An initial warrant allowed police to search for stolen goods by known thieves living at the address on June 17.

They were looking for goods stolen from properties throughout Bendigo and Long Gully on June 14/15.

Even the most experienced investigators were confronted by the filth they saw during that search.

But among the rubbish they found a set top box stolen from a property across the road from the Eaglehawk Road home where Zayden was killed, which put one of the occupants of the house in the area at the time of the burglaries and the death.

Each of the occupants was interviewed, but Hicks had already fled Bendigo, leaving for Gisborne the day after Zayden’s murder, a day earlier than planned.

The Victoria Police Homicide Squad believed Hicks was ‘merely a person of interest’ because he was a known burglar and stolen goods were found at his address, so they set about finding him.

Hicks was in Gisborne with his then-girlfriend Martina at that stage – searching the burglaries and the baby’s death on the internet. He had also cut up his tracksuit.

When Martina told him she had received a phone call to say the police were looking for him, Hicks fled. He spent the night at the Gisborne football oval, before phoning his father John Hicks the following day.

Police received information to say John was travelling to Gisborne to collect his son and return to Bendigo on June 19, so detectives set up an intercept at Big Hill.

It was there that Hicks was arrested, while hiding in the rear seat of his father’s car.

At that stage he was only a suspect for the burglary at Eaglehawk Road.

But it was from that moment, the pieces started coming together for investigators – and it was Hicks himself who gave it away.

He soon became a person of interest regarding the death of Zayden, but there was still nothing that put him in the house.

From the minute he was arrested on the Calder Highway, Hicks immediately put up a false killer. He started shooting off at the mouth, telling police from the outset he was with another man on the night of the burglaries. Naming an innocent man as being with him that night.

Over three days, Hicks told the story of being out that night with that man and parting ways when they got to Eaglehawk Road.

That man was arrested on June 19, but there was a problem with Hicks’ story. He had an iron-clad alibi. He was never out that night with Harley Hicks. He did not commit any burglaries and did not kill Zayden.

That information led police to a second search of the Green Street address.

This time they found a wallet reported stolen by Mr Tisell in a car outside the home of the Hicks brothers, which the occupants used for ‘storage’ – and, they found a baton. It was still some time before that baton was connected to the killing.

Throughout the trial, Hicks’ brothers tried to say that instrument was used as a dog’s chew toy, but there was no evidence a dog had been anywhere near it. Martina, however, had seen that baton hidden behind a picture frame. It was the murder weapon.

Hicks was not questioned over the murder, but on the morning of June 21, he offered a plea of guilty without admission to a series of thefts, burglaries and attempted burglaries overnight on June 14 and 15 – 11 matters in total, but excluding that at Eaglehawk Road.

He also pleaded guilty to 10 other offences relating to thefts and burglaries committed prior to that night.

Hicks was sentenced to 12 months’ youth detention.

Those pleas were excluded from the Supreme Court murder trial because Hicks’ defence successfully argued it would be unfair to have them admitted in circumstances where he pleaded guilty to avoid being remanded in custody in an adult prison.

Hicks told his legal team he didn’t want to go adult prison because of an allegation of sexual assault he had previously made against an inmate at Port Phillip Prison. He wanted the matter finalised that day so he would more than likely go into youth detention.

Hicks admitted an attempted burglary at 23 Duncan Street, a burglary at 30 Wilson Street and the theft from a vehicle in Jackson Street, where the set top box was stolen, but denied any involvement with the other offences that night at Dillon, Bray and Bolt streets and Havilah Road. His defence team said he pleaded guilty to all matters, knowing that if the matter was adjourned he would be remanded in adult custody because of outstanding matters before the court.

Hicks’ defence lawyer David Hallowes further submitted that if the pleas of guilty were admitted in the trial, his lawyer would need to be called as a witness and that would reveal that Hicks had previously spent time in an adult jail, which would be prejudicial to his client.

Crown prosecutor Michele Williams SC argued Hicks knew what he was doing and did not dispute or deny any of the allegations in the police summary. She said Hicks was familiar with the legal system having had previous court appearances in other criminal matters and was looking after his own interests.

In ruling against allowing the pleas of guilty to all matters during the murder trial, Justice Stephen Kaye said the decision was not clear cut as Hicks knew precisely the charges brought against him and there was no evidence of any misconception or misunderstanding.

But he said Hicks was a young man with a pressing reason for not wanting to return to adult custody and based on the admissions he had made during his interview with police, there was a strong likelihood he would have been given a custodial sentence.

Justice Kaye said Hicks’ lawyer at the time did not have sufficient information to properly advise her client as he had entered the guilty pleas so quickly after a three-day interview with police and the police brief had not been compiled.

He said there were significant questions as to the reliability of the pleas of guilty as truthful admissions by Hicks of his guilt and it seemed clear he pleaded guilty by way of expediency rather than because he admitted the allegations against him were true.

On June 21, 2012, Hicks was sent to a youth detention centre for the thefts and burglaries. But the investigation into the murder of a child continued.

Hicks by now was a suspect. He had put up lies about being with another man that night and a wallet belonging to Zayden’s then stepfather was found at Hicks’ address.

His three-day interview with police, and time spent in the holding cells with an undercover police operative, revealed information only the killer would know.

In the pre-trial arguments, Hicks’ defence team tried to have the record of interview excluded from the murder trial, but their request was denied.

Sitting in his office reviewing the evidence some weeks after Hicks was sent to youth detention, Detective Senior Constable Tony Harwood of the homicide squad compared baby Zayden’s injuries with a baton collected during a search of Green Street. It was sent for forensic tests. There was a match.

One end of the baton was covered in Zayden’s DNA – the other carried the DNA of Harley Hicks.

So too, did the stolen set top box – stolen from a property Hicks had admitted being at on the night of the killing.

On September 24, 2012, Harley Hicks appeared briefly in the Melbourne Magistrates Court charged with murder. He later entered a plea of not guilty.

When his first lie about a false killer didn’t work, Hicks turned to the DNA evidence as his defence.

The trouble with the DNA was that Hicks had an identical twin, and identical twins have identical DNA.

As that fact was told to the Supreme Court by a forensic officer, Harley winked at Detective Harwood from the dock. It was a glimpse of the cockiness shown during his record of interview with police.

But that argument only pointed further to his guilt.

Harley’s twin, Ashley Hicks, also had an alibi. Despite the defence team doing its best to ask the question as to just which twin killed the baby, Ashley’s alibi stacked up.

He was at home with his father that night. John Hicks supported his son’s story.

Ashley didn’t kill Zayden.

Harley Hicks did.

The court was told was that Hicks was out committing a series of burglaries overnight on June 14/15, 2012, when he entered 10-month-old Zayden’s home and killed him. No one knows why, but the prosecution put to the jury that it was possible the baby woke and Hicks needed to silence him to avoid being caught stealing from the house. He had ‘hit the jackpot’ Ms Williams said, finding almost $2000 in cash, and did not want to be detected.

Earlier in the night, Hicks told his brother Josh, Josh’s girlfriend Danielle and Martina he was heading out. Over his shoulder was a black bag. Josh said his brother always carried that shoulder bag. The same bag described by a couple who chased a man from their yard about midnight. The chase during which Hicks would lose his shoes.

Martina would later tell the court Hicks left twice that night, once to buy drugs, and later again.

The jury heard Hicks told police he was on the shard that night; crystal methamphetamine, known as ice.

But he said the man he was out with that night – the false killer he put up – had been using the methamphetamine ice and was “really, really aggressive … scary aggressive”.

The prosecution said Hicks was actually talking about himself.

But the jury couldn’t be told the extent of Hicks’ habit – and for how long he had been a drug user.

Hicks’ history includes years of repeated drug abuse, including cannabis, heroin, ecstasy, alcohol and ice.

Nor could the jury be told of his priors, which were escalating.

They knew Hicks was already on the run from police that night. Indeed, only three days earlier officers had gone to his home looking for him.

But the jury didn’t know Hicks had a long criminal history, which started at the age of 14, and included thefts, criminal damage, aggravated burglary and armed robbery.

The murder and series of burglaries and thefts were committed two months after Hicks was placed on a Community Corrections Order for armed robbery.

But on this night, Hicks was still stealing whatever he could from easily accessible places – glove boxes in unlocked cars, and houses.

The back door at Eaglehawk Road could not be locked.

But because his earlier pleas of guilty to those offences in the Magistrates Court, excluding the burglary at Eaglehawk Road, could not be admitted during the trial, Detective Harwood had to reinvestigate each one.

He needed fresh evidence during the Supreme Court trial – but led to a hiccup in proceedings.

The chase where he lost his shoes was pivotal. So too, were his movements afterwards – and just what was he wearing on his feet?

Martina reported Hicks was wearing a pair of motorcycle boots the day the pair left for Gisborne on June 15. She had never seen them before and they were far too big for him.

But the occupants at a house in Dillon Street burgled on June 14/15, 2012, knew the boots only too well, as they belonged to them.

But it wasn’t until a fresh statement was made by the Dillon Street occupants on March 13 this year that the boots were reported stolen that night. It was two weeks into the murder trial.

The prosecution then sought to have the boots admitted as evidence so the sole could be compared to a footprint on a couch in the rear yard of the Eaghlehawk Road home where Zayden was killed.

That new piece of evidence brought the trial to a standstill.

Sixteen prosecution witnesses had already been called and the trial was well-advanced.

A day was set aside for legal argument, during which the defence put to Justice Kaye that the evidence had come to light late in the trial and the prosecution had opened the case stating no link could be drawn between a mark on the couch, which had been pushed by the residents at the property against a fence, and the accused man.

Mr Hallowes said the prosecution had access to the boots before the trial and knew Hicks was wearing them from June 15 to 18.

He said had the boots been tendered as evidence earlier, the defence may have approached the case differently and cross-examined witnesses in another manner.

Justice Kaye agreed the evidence was produced late in the trial and whilst he accepted the statement from the Dillon Street resident might have prompted investigators to look at the link, there was sufficient evidence to draw the link beforehand.

In his ruling, Justice Kaye said it was “a pity this has come to pass’’.

“I am loathe, in a case like this, to shut out evidence of this type and I certainly do not wish to be critical but the fact is little new has emerged. The police had the boots in their possession, they had a cut out of the print, they had Martina Lawn’s evidence in relation to her understanding that the boots had been stolen that night and the matter was raised by Mr Hallowes at the committal. In addition, we had two weeks of pre-trial argument for the Crown to consider issues such as this. It is not my role to punish or criticise the prosecution, but in weighing up the fairness of excluding it, it is a factor that must be taken into account.

“Fundamentally,  my role is to ensure that the accused man receives a fair trial. In my view, as I have stated, there would be strong prejudice to the accused in the conduct of the trial if were to admit the evidence.

“No direction given by me could allay that prejudice before the jury. I am of the view that prejudice does outweigh any probative value of the evidence and so I have come to the inevitable conclusion that I must exclude it.’’

Few could argue Hicks wasn’t afforded a fair trial.

The law dictates all accused persons are entitled to the presumption of innocence – and that must be the starting point. It was up to the prosecution to prove Hicks guilty.

The ruling about the boots was made and the trial continued.

But at the same time, something changed.

In the early days of the five-week trial, Hicks took notes. Pages and pages of colour-coded scrawl. Some in red, other lines in blue. He seemed to be paying attention. But as the trial went into days and weeks, the notes slowly stopped. His attention was sporadic and on one occasion, he could be heard snoring in the dock. A break in proceedings was called before the jurors picked up on his nap – but there’s no doubt some would have noticed.

This jury was astute. The prosecution, defence and Justice Kaye spoke several times of the particularly careful and observant group that formed the jury.

A jury charged with the responsibility of a harrowing trial. A jury charged with taking everything in.

And they did.

They would have known each time Hicks started shaking – a shake of the leg that became louder and louder each time evidence linking him to the murder was put before the court. The shaking alone told a powerful story – he was nervous, and more so at certain times. They would have noticed.

And they certainly noticed the antics of Hicks’ supporters in court. The interaction between Hicks and his brother in the witness box, which attracted a caution. The note-taking by Hicks’ fiancee,  who followed witnesses from the courtroom – actions that came close to having her found in contempt of court.

They would not have known about the stern warning given by Justice Kaye to Hicks’ mum about posting photos of her son in the dock on Facebook – but that would have been the exception.

This jury didn’t miss a trick, and there were a few of them.

But importantly, they never lost a sense of why they were there – and that was to deliver a verdict in a trial involving the horrific, violent death of a baby.

They listened to, and considered, every piece of evidence. They questioned. They asked for breaks when everyone grew tired. It was exhausting.

But they also watched a family sitting in the courtroom in the hope of justice being served for their beautiful little boy. They were told to separate emotion and look at the facts, which they did. But there was no doubt they were well aware of the trust Zayden’s family put in them to do that properly.

Little Zayden’s family attended court every day. Their heads would fall every time a new piece of distressing evidence was put to the court, but their strength kept them there.

No one in court could ever properly express just how brave that family was.

The brave mother who told her story of finding her baby beaten to death in his cot.

The last time she saw her son alive was when she gave him a bottle and helped him re-settle. He had a cold and needed some medication.

The next day her little boy’s injuries brought the most hardened police and paramedics to tears.

A brave father and his partner who never got to hold their little boy and say goodbye. Who listened to every word said to defend their son’s killer.

A father who remembers a little boy who only a day before he died said the word dad for the first time.

Grandparents equally heartbroken and robbed of the love of a small child who was their world.

The pain of the trial ended for them when the jury delivered a guilty verdict. Today, Justice Kaye will hand down his sentence.

The legal process will be over. Hicks will be sentenced for his heinous crime.

But there will never, ever be justice for baby Zayden, or those who loved him.

This tragedy does not end with Zayden’s death. It does not end with a verdict, or a sentence. It will ever end for those he is survived by. Their pain will never, ever end.


 

The Harley Hicks trial – the case day by day

THE HARLEY HICKS TRIAL – DAY 1…

Supreme Court trial begins

A BENDIGO baby was struck at least 25 times to the head and killed with a home-made baton during a burglary at his Long Gully home, the Victorian Supreme Court has heard. Read full story here

THE HARLEY HICKS TRIAL - DAY 2…

Mother tells of moment she found her baby covered in blood

THE mother of a Bendigo baby bludgeoned to death in his cot has told the Supreme Court of the harrowing moment she found her son limp and covered in blood. Read full story here

THE HARLEY HICKS TRIAL - DAY 3…

Twin brother says he was at home on night of Bendigo baby murder

THE twin brother of accused man Harley Hicks says he was at home the night baby Zayden Veal-Whitting was killed and did not commit the murder. Read fully story here 

Mum’s partner says he ‘loved those boys’

THE partner of Casey Veal has told the Supreme Court he loved Ms Veal’s children and did not kill baby Zayden. Read full story here

THE HARLEY HICKS TRIAL - DAY 4…

I saw baton in Harley’s bedroom: Witness

THE older brother of Harley Hicks has told the court he saw a baton on the floor of the bedroom of the accused man several days after baby Zayden Veal-Whitting was found bludgeoned to death in his cot. Read full story here

THE HARLEY HICKS TRIAL – DAY 5…

Hicks trial hears of backyard intruder

Accused seen leaving house wearing grey hoodie and carrying bag. Witness tells of backyard intruder. Read full storyhere

THE HARLEY HICKS TRIAL – DAY 6… 

Questions raised about twin’s alibi

QUESTIONS have been raised about the alibi of the twin brother of the man accused of murdering baby Zayden Veal-Whitting on the night of the child’s death. Read full story here 

THE HARLEY HICKS TRIAL – DAY 7…

Hicks trial: Twin brother was home that night, court hears

THE twin brother of the man accused of murdering baby Zayden Veal-Whitting was at home on the night of the child’s death, the father of Harley and Ashley Hicks has told the Supreme Court. Read full story here

Weapon was not focus of search

POLICE were not looking for a murder weapon the first time they searched the residence of the man accused of murdering baby Zayden Veal-Whitting, the Supreme Court has heard. Full story here

THE HARLEY HICKS TRIAL – DAY 8…

Ex girlfriend was too scared to tell police what she saw

THE former girlfriend of the man accused of murdering baby Zayden Veal-Whitting has told the Supreme Court she was too scared to tell police what she saw in the days that followed the baby’s death. Full story here

THE HARLEY HICKS TRIAL – DAY 9…

Stolen wallet links to baton

A WALLET and identification cards belonging to the stepfather of baby Zayden Veal-Whitting were found in a car at the home of the man accused of the child’s murder, the Supreme Court has heard. Read full story here

THE HARLEY HICKS TRIAL – DAY 10….

Court hears Hicks tell of burglaries and ICE

THE man accused of murdering baby Zayden Veal-Whitting told an undercover police officer he had been on ICE and was committing burglaries the night the child was killed. Full story here

DNA on baton matches accused man

A HOME-MADE baton alleged to be the weapon used to kill a 10-month-old baby was found carrying DNA matching the man accused of the murder, the Supreme Court has heard. Read full story here

THE HARLEY HICKS TRIAL – DAY 11…

No blood on baton: expert

A HOME-MADE baton which prosecutors allege was used to bludgeon a baby to death did not have traces of blood, a court has heard. Full story here

THE HARLEY HICKS TRIAL – DAY 12..

Defence questions search

THE defence counsel of the man accused of murdering Long Gully baby Zayden Veal-Whitting has questioned how thoroughly police searched for a murder weapon. Full story here

THE HARLEY HICKS TRIAL – DAY 13..

Detective links baton with baby’s injuries

THE detective  responsible for the investigation into the killing of Zayden Veal-Whitting says the discovery of a home-made baton alleged by the Crown to be the murder weapon was a “chance finding’’. Full story here

Crown gives closing address in Hicks trial. 

THE Crown is giving its closing address in the Supreme Court in the hope of proving beyond reasonable doubt the accused man Harley Hicks killed baby Zayden Veal-Whitting. Read full story here

THE HARLEY HICKS TRIAL – DAY 14…

Crown says case is ‘jigsaw’

PROSECUTORS have told a Supreme Court jury the case against the man accused of murdering Long Gully baby Zayden Veal-Whitting is like a jigsaw puzzle. Read full story here

THE HARLEY HICKS TRIAL – DAY 15…

‘False killer’ story is about Hicks, Crown says

THE crown says a story made up about a ‘false killer’ by the man accused of murdering baby Zayden Veal-Whitting was actually his own story. Full story here

Hicks jury asked to put aside prejudice

THE jury has been asked to put aside any prejudice against the man accused of murdering baby Zayden Veal-Whitting and judge the case against him on the evidence. Full story here

THE HARLEY HICKS TRIAL – DAY 16…

Hicks told lies to protect: defence

A SUPREME Court jury has been asked to consider the possibility Harley Hicks told lies to protect someone else, possibly his twin brother. Read full story here

THE HARLEY HICKS TRIAL – DAY 17…

Defence says baton was murder weapon

LAWYERS defending the man accused of murdering baby Zayden Veal-Whitting have ruled out the child’s stepfather as a possible ‘other’ for causing the death – but have put to the Supreme Court that Harley Hicks is covering for someone. Read full story here

THE HARLEY HICKS TRIAL – DAY 18…

Hicks defence says evidence doesn’t fit

THE defence team representing Harley Hicks says there are five key pieces evidence that don’t fit with the prosecution’s case the accused man killed Zayden Veal-Whitting. Read full story here

THE VERDICT: 

Harley Hicks found guilty of murder. Full coverage here

Hicks guilty of baby murder. Read story here

A liar, a thief and a killer

Hicks’ mum breached judge’s order

Woman cautioned in Hicks trial for following witnesses out of court

Jury asks questions about Hicks coaching brother in witness box

EDITORIAL: Thoughts are with Zayden’s family.

Zayden’s family tells of heavy hearts

THE family of Zayden Veal-Whitting doesn’t want to live in a world of hate – but that intense and deep emotion blankets them because of the “monster’’ who killed their little boy. Read full story here

The plea hearing

Crown calls for life sentence for baby killer in plea hearing in the Supreme Court.

Mother’s plea to drug users

Mother of baby Zayden Veal-Whitting wants son’s killer to stay behind bars for life … and makes plea to ice users to think of her little boy and give up the drug. Read full story here

Hicks to be sentenced

Harley Hicks will be sentenced on June 13. Full story here

Galleries: 

GALLERY: The Harley Hicks trial

GALLERY: The committal

GALLERY: The trial

GALLERY: Exhibits tendered during the trial

Adrian Bayley Pleads Guilty to Rape – Not Guilty to Murdering Jill Meagher


Jill Meagher

Adrian Bayley admitted raping and strangling Jill Meagher in a Melbourne laneway, but has pleaded not guilty to her murder.  The 41 year old will stand trial in the Victorian Supreme Court after the Deputy Chief Magistrate found there was enough evidence for a jury to convict him.  Bayley pleaded guilty to one count of rape in the Melbourne Magistrates Court yesterday and not guilty to murder and another two charges of rape.

UPDATE 5TH MAY 2013

Adrian Bayley arriving at court 5th May 2013

Adrian Bayley arriving at court 5th May 2013

ADRIAN Bayley has arrived at the Supreme Court for a hearing over the death of Melbourne woman Jill Meagher, where he is expected to plead guilty to charges of murder. More to come…

Bayley, 41, pleaded guilty in the Melbourne Magistrates’ Court on March 12 to one count of raping Ms Meagher.

He pleaded not guilty to her murder and two of three counts of rape.

Bayley was set to stand trial over the murder in a Brunswick laneway in September – a year after the crime that shocked the nation.

Last moments of Jill Meagher’s life

  • by: Paul Anderson – From: Herald Sun
  • March 13, 2013 8:59AM

THE man accused of murdering Jill Meagher ran out of petrol after burying the Irish-born ABC employee in a shallow grave, according to court documents.

A police summary of the case against Adrian Bayley, tendered in court, was released to the media after Bayley’s committal hearing yesterday.According to the summary, on the night of September 21 last year, while Ms Meagher was out celebrating with friends in Brunswick, Bayley was arguing with his girlfriend at Swanston St’s Lounge Bar.

The pipeline layer, 41, was arguing with her about “jealousy and possessiveness”. His girlfriend left and returned to their home in Coburg.

“The accused (Bayley) attempted to contact his girlfriend by phone; however, she refused to answer or return text messages and phone calls,” the summary stated.

Bayley left the Lounge Bar at 12.25am and caught a taxi home. There, he changed into a blue hoodie jumper, the summary said.It was about 1am when Ms Meagher, 29, left the Brunswick Green Hotel with a friend and walked to the Etiquette Bar.

Her friend left soon after, twice offering Ms Meagher a ride in a taxi. But she declined, deciding to walk the short distance home.

On her way, outside Chemist Warehouse, she asked a group of three people for a cigarette and had a “short friendly conversation” with the trio.

She then continued on her way along Sydney Rd, towards Hope St. Bayley was in the area by that stage, and saw Ms Meagher walking alone.

“(Bayley) has run up from behind Ms Meagher before slowing to a walk as he approached her.” The Police summary said

Bayley would later tell police: “I was just walking ahead of her and we’d already interacted on Sydney Rd and that’s when she rang her brother. She was actually telling me about her father.”

Ms Meagher called her brother, Michael McKeon, at 1.35am to talk about their sick father.
Mr McKeon said he would call her back in a minute or two. He would try, but his sister’s phone would ring out several times.

Ms Meagher’s husband, Tom, knew his wife was out for drinks with workmates.

At 1.37am, he sent her a text message from their home: “Are you okay?”

The Chief Crown prosecutor, Gavin Silbert, SC, told the court it was 1.38am when Bayley “accosted” Ms Meagher and “proceeded to drag her into a laneway on Hope St between Oven St and Sydney Rd, where he has raped and strangled her”.A bin and parked car in a laneway off Hope St, Brunswick, where Jill Meagher's handbag was found

Bayley later told detectives: “I actually apologised. I can’t imagine how she felt but I know how I felt. All I thought was, ‘What have I done?’ “

Mr Silbert told the court: “(Bayley) has left the body of the deceased in the laneway and returned to his home address, where he has collected a shovel and his white Holden Astra.”

At 1.47am, an extremely worried Tom Meagher sent his wife another text.

“Answer me, I’m really worried,” it read.

He sent another at 2.07am: “Please pick up.”

The court heard Bayley returned to the laneway at 4.22am and put Ms Meagher’s body into the boot of the car.

He drove to Blackhill Rd, Gisborne South, where he buried Ms Meagher by the side of the road.

“I cried, man, and I dug a hole . . . I didn’t cry for me,” Bayley told detectives.

Tom Meagher, meanwhile, had searched the Brunswick streets in vain.

Adrian Bayley as he was taken into custody in the back of a police car. Picture: Stephen Harman

“I kept trying to ring her but there was no answer,” he said in his police statement.

Bayley was driving home from Gisborne when his car ran out of petrol near the Calder Highway.

He managed to wave down motorist Dayle Watkins, who drove him to a nearby service station.

There, about 6am, he filled a jerry can with petrol.

Mr Watkins then drove Bayley back to his vehicle.

On September 27, after investigating the crime scene and gathering evidence, including CCTV footage and phone records, homicide detectives arrested Bayley.

“After investigators informed (Bayley) of the evidence implicating him, he made admissions,” the police summary stated.

“(Bayley) stated that it was due to the argument that he had had earlier in the night with his girlfriend, that (Bayley) had an angry and aggressive demeanour which he transferred onto the deceased.”

Yesterday, Bayley pleaded not guilty to one count of murder and two counts of rape.

He pleaded guilty to one charge of rape.

EDITED RECORD OF INTERVIEW WITH ADRIAN ERNEST BAYLEY TENDERED TO COURT 

Adrian Ernest Bayley

BAYLEY: You know what? I hope I never get out, because you know why I hope that, because then no one else ever has to be hurt because someone hurts me. I don’t deal with – with hurt very well. You know it wasn’t really my intention to hurt her, you know that? When we conversed, I swear to you man – I swear to I’d – I’d just – I spoke to her and she looked – she looked distraught. Does that make sense?

DETECTIVE:Yeah it does.

BAYLEY:She didn’t look happy.

DETECTIVE:Yeah it does.

BAYLEY:And I spoke to – I spoke to hear, you now and said, look, I’ll just – I’ll – I’ll help you, you know. That’s what I said to her and she was like fu… anyway it doesn’t matter. She flipped me off and that made me angry, because I was trying to do a nice thing. You know that?

DETECTIVE: Yeah yeah.

BAYLEY: She looked distraught.

BAYLEY:She looked distraught, you know. She looked like she was lost … always try to do the right thing some – you know, most of the time and I didn’t take well to her response, you know. I just don’t wanna go through it in detail. That – I can’t.

DETECTIVE: What happened to Jill?

BAYLEY:They should have the death penalty for people like me.

DETECTIVE:I can’t tell you what’s gonna happen.

BAYLEY:No well – that’s what I hope.

DETECTIVE:So you said she fobbed you off and you got angry. Tell me what happened then?

BAYLEY:Oh I just got pissed off and I actually walked off and she followed. I actually walked in front of her and she followed.

DETECTIVE:Yep.

BAYLEY:And it just got worse.

DETECTIVE:Tell me what happened.

BAYLEY:(Starts to cry) … like a big sissy man.

BAYLEY:I wanna do the right thing. It’s not fair on any of this to – it’s not fair of any of this stuff to have happened, let alone her family and stuff too.

DETECTIVE: Yeah.

BAYLEY:Not knowing.

DETECTIVE:Would you be willing to come with me and show me?

BAYLEY:I’ll try. I’ll do my best man.

DETECTIVE:I appreciate that.

BAYLEY:I’m not sure how to get there.

BAYLEY:I know what I’m saying to you. It’s not fair for this to have happened, and it’s not fair on her family and its not fair on them not knowing. It’s not fair.

DETECTIVE:Um. I understand why you don’t want to go into the detail. I understand that totally. Um how – how did she die?

BAYLEY: (Starts to cry). I strangled her.

DETECTIVE:Sorry?

BAYLEY: (Continues to cry). What have I done? What have I done man?

DETECTIVE:And where did that happen?

BAYLEY:On Hope Street.

DETECTIVE:How did she come to get in the laneway?

BAYLEY:we – we walked past it.

DETECTIVE:yeah

BAYLEY:That far down Hope St. I didn’t take her from the street, or – you know?

DETECTIVE: Yeah and then?

BAYLEY:And we were just talking you know? We weren’t – there was no argument, there was no – it was just talking. And then um …

DETECTIVE:Alright.

BAYLEY:I was just walking ahead of her and we’d already interacted on Sydney Rd, and that’s when she rang her brother. She was actually telling me about her father.

DETECTIVE:Right

BAYLEY:You know? And I was just – I was trying to be nice and – she kept going from being nice to nasty, to nice, to – you know what I mean?

DETECTIVE:Yep.

BAYLEY:And it just sort of ended up in the alley. I cant remember yeah, you know what I mean, 100 per cent, like how it ended up. We were just sort of – we were standing there.

DETECTIVE: Um how did you – how did you strangle her?

BAYLEY:With my hands.

DETECTIVE:With your hands. And once that had happened, what did you do?

(interview interrupted by knock at door, then resumes)

BAYLEY:I didn’t run.

DETECTIVE:You didn’t run?

BAYLEY:(starts to cry) That’s not it man. I actually apologised.

DETECTIVE:To her?

BAYLEY:But I didn’t run. I didn’t – didn’t know what to do. It’s a horrible feeling man.

DETECTIVE: Yeah.

BAYLEY:I can’t imagine how – how she felt, but I know how I felt. It’s not nice man, its not nice. And all I thought was what have I done? That’s all I thought. That was the thought in my head, what have I done after I said sorry. I didn’t know what else to say, man. I don’t know what else to say.

DETECTIVE:And what happened to her belongings?

BAYLEY:The phone I smashed. Just the other stuff I threw.

DETECTIVE:You walk to the side, you get the shovel. Tell me what you do.

BAYLEY:I cried man, and I dug a hole.

DETECTIVE:Yeah

BAYLEY: I cried man, And I didn’t cry for me, you need to understand that. I didn’t cry for me, just like I’m not crying for me now.

Jill Meagher

TIMELINE

Saturday September 22, 2012

  • 1.30am: Jill Meagher leaves Bar Etiquette in Sydney Rd, Brunswick, in Melbourne’s inner-north to walk home. CCTV from the Dutchess Boutique captures both Ms Meagher and Adrian Bayley walking past.
  • 1.38am: Mr Bayley allegedly grabs Ms Meagher and drags her into a nearby laneway off Hope St.
  • 1.40am – 1.45am: Neighbours hear a woman yelling from laneway. After a few minutes the yelling stops.
  • 2am: Tom Meagher tries calling his wife’s mobile phone.
  • 4am: Mr Meagher leaves his home in Lux Way – not far from the scene – to go and look for his wife.
  • 4.22am: It is alleged that having gone home to Coburg in Melbourne’s northern suburbs for a shovel, Mr Bayley returns in his white Holden Astra.
  • 4.26am: Car allegedly drives off with Ms Meagher’s body in the boot.
  • 6am: After continuing to call his wife’s phone all night without luck, Mr Meagher reports her missing.

Sunday September 23

  • 12.30pm: A Facebook page is set up in the hope somebody saw Ms Meagher.
  • 3.15pm: Police release public call for information about Ms Meagher’s disappearance.

Monday September 24

  • 6.30am: Ms Meagher’s handbag found in lane off Hope St. Police believe it was planted the day before.
  • 8.50am: Homicide squad takes over the case.
  • 1.45pm: Forensic officers recover evidence from the lane way. Detectives interview Mr Meagher.

Tuesday September 25

  • 12.30pm: Forensic police search the Meagher home and take away their car and bags of items for testing.
  • 3.55pm: Police release footage from the Dutchess Boutique of Ms Meagher and a man in a blue hoodie.
  • 6.15pm: Police return to the Meagher home and search again.

Thursday September 27

  • 2.30pm: Mr Bayley arrested in Coburg.
  • 3.58pm: Police interview with Mr Bayley begins.
  • 10pm: Interview suspended while police travel to a site allegedly nominated by Mr Bayley.

Friday September 28

  • 3am: Mr Bayley remanded at an out-of-sessions hearing after being charged with murder.
  • 4am: Ms Meagher’s body is taken away by coronial staff after being recovered from a shallow grave at the side of Black Hill Rd in Gisborne South, north of Melbourne.

How much longer till the police pounce on Baden-Clay killer?


Been a few days since an update and the other thread is getting very slow to load thanks to hundreds upon hundreds of comments and discussion. The stuff I’m hearing around the traps is amazing, and if I were in any way whatsoever involved in this I would be getting my affairs in order, because there is not a lot of time left on freedom street.

The Original extensive coverage here folks, with many more pictures and important videos…It is slow to load with so many comments…http://aussiecriminals.com.au/2012/04/26/what-has-happened-to-missing-mother-allison-baden-clay/

UPDATE 16/05/12 WITNESSES COME FORWARD ON CAR

These are the Baden-Clay cars, any connection to a smaller blue 4 wheel drive I wonder?

A WITNESS has told police of seeing two four-wheel-drives near Kholo Creek crossing early on the day Allison Baden-Clay was reported missing.

It is alleged a white four-wheel-drive didn’t have its headlights on, only parking lights, and was closely tailing a smaller, blue four-wheel-drive at about 4am on April 20.

The witness told of noticing the vehicles at Anstead in Brisbane’s west – within 2km of where the 43-year-old mother of three’s body was found 10 days later. Police said Mrs Baden-Clay was reported missing by her husband Gerard at 7.30am Friday after she failed to return from her usual morning walk.

He told police he had last seen his wife at their Brookfield home about 10pm the previous night.

It is understood several members of the community have come forward with information, triggering a number of new lines of investigation.

Police have established a major incident room with detectives, intelligence analysts and forensic officers to help with the investigation.
A trust fund has been set up for the daughters of Allison Baden-Clay. Donations can be made through the NAB to BSB: 084 737, account: 133 196 502, or via badenclay.appeal@gmail.com

They are believed to be awaiting results from forensic tests including toxicology.

The Baden-Clays’ cars – a white Toyota Prado four-wheel-drive and a silver Holden Captiva – were taken in by police for forensic tests and have since been released.

Mrs Baden-Clay’s funeral, held last Friday, included a guard of honour by students from Ipswich Girls’ Grammar where she was vice-captain.

Talks are under way to establish a memorial plaque for the mother of three as tributes continue to pour in.

Several fundraisers have been held.

Well-wishers wanting to help the Baden-Clay family have been encouraged to donate to the Allison Baden-Clay appeal. Donations can be made via NAB to BSB: 084737, account number: 133196502.

Celebrations at this week’s Brookfield Show, held just 200m from the Baden-Clays’ home, are expected to be somewhat sombre.

The show, which begins tomorrow at Brookfield Showgrounds where police set up a command post while they searched for Mrs Baden-Clay , was sponsored last year by Gerard Baden-Clay’s Century 21 real estate franchise.

The Baden-Clay family have been members of the Brookfield Show Society in the past but it is believed they did not renew their membership this year.

The show is expected to attract about 20,000 people.

Brookfield Show Society president James Booth said the event would be a rallying point for the community affected by the tragic loss of Mrs Baden-Clay.


How long more till the police pounce on Baden-Clay killer?

How long more will the public have to wait for the police to make an arrest over the brutal killing of Allison Baden-Clay?

Time is creeping on and the police have assured the people of Brisbane’s western suburbs there is no crazed killer on the loose ready to attack again.

If that is true, they must have their quarry well and truly within their sights and must be superbly confident the killer will not strike again.

Speculation remains at fever pitch across southeast Queensland as to the identity of the killer.

There is even a suggestion in legal circles that up to 5 people may be arrested over the murder, including accessories after the fact. Presumably, if that is right, the police will make simultaneous arrests over the next few days, which would make a 5-pronged interviewing process incredibly demanding on the police as well as putting intense pressure on those in custody to confess.

Speculation is rife that the killer may have even attended the church service at St Paul’s in Ipswich last Friday which might explain the incredible rumour circulating at the moment that the police had secret microphones planted in the flowers at the service in case someone whispered words which could be construed by a jury as a confession or an admission or indication of guilt.

It seems the police are leaving no stone unturned in this case with phone taps, vehicle tracking devices and seizure of medical and computer records no doubt just the tip of the iceberg, as the net closes on the killer who will have more explaining to do than Peter Slipper and Craig Thomson combined.

This is shaping up as the murder trial to end all trials in Queensland with justice for Allison Baden-Clay hopefully only hours away.

via

A SCIENTIST who gave forensic evidence in the defence of Lindy Chamberlain says Allison Baden-Clay’s body would be telling the story of her death to detectives investigating her murder.

As police reveal they are close to an arrest, one of Australia’s best-known biological scientists, professor emeritus Barry Boettcher, said pathology results would be telling police what Mrs Baden-Clay can’t.

The mother-of-three’s body was found on the banks of the Kholo Creek at Mt Crosby on April 30, 11 days after she allegedly left her Brookfield home for a late-night walk.

She was reported missing at 7.30am the following morning by her husband, Gerard.

Her body was discovered by a passing canoeist, who spotted her lying on the bank of the creek under a bridge.

It is not known whether she had been there the entire time, whether she had been moved, or whether heavy rain in the days before the discovery washed her downstream.

Prof Boettcher said in many cases, it could be easily determined.

“When somebody dies, blood will pool to the lowest portions of the body depending on how they are positioned,” he said.

“If the body is then moved, that could be determined from the body being in a different position to where the blood has already settled if the blood is not appropriate to the new position.”

He said the blood would not re-pool if a body had been in a certain position for some days.

“Forensic people would readily be able to determine whether a body had been moved after several days,” Prof Boettcher said.

The professor said it was unusual to get useful information from under someone’s fingernails.

“Material under the fingernails would suffer from being in water but secondly – and I have specifically done a study on this – it is a beautiful spot for bacteria to grow,” Prof Boettcher said.

“Material under the fingernails will get digested from under the fingernails in just a few hours.

“I often scoff at television programs that show people being convicted on vital evidence obtained from under fingernails because it needs to be obtained very rapidly.”

He said it could take weeks for police to receive all the results from forensic tests.

Former lecturer and author of Crucial Errors in Murder Investigations Ted Duhs, who has worked with Prof Boettcher, said it was obvious police were working to eliminate various theories on the killer.

“A murder is about theories, who the perpetrator was, what the motive was and so on,” he said.

“I noticed the investigating detective said he did not believe it was a random killing – and if that is true then they have eliminated at least one theory.”

Detective Superintendent Mark Ainsworth confirmed this weekend that police did not believe Mrs Baden-Clay was killed by a random attacker.

“At this stage we don’t believe it is random,” he said.

“We believe that Allison may have known her attacker.”

Yesterday, Mrs Baden-Clay’s three daughters, aged 10, 8 and 5, had their first Mother’s Day without her.

My Poem dedicated to Allison by Robbo

Silly man, thought you could play
By making the wife just go away…

Weak and cowardly, you lied and lied
Knowing your kids mummy, had already died

You tried to hide and play so sad
Made everyone around you so very mad

Coward Clay, a poor excuse of a man
You are on your way to a prison van.

ALL VIDEO WILL GO HERE AT THE BOTTOM AS I ADD IT , FOR FORMATTING REASONS…THANKS

http://youtu.be/j-MsU_So4M0

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