Shane Andrew Bond not guilty of the murder of Elisabeth Membrey


A SUPREME Court jury has found Shane Andrew Bond not guilty of the murder of Elisabeth Membrey 18 years ago.

(video might not show, youtube is playing up, click watch in youtube…It is there and working…)

Shane Bond leaving the Supreme Court last week.

The jury this morning found Bond not guilty of murder and manslaughter.

Bond, 45, of Launching Place, denied murdering the 22-year-old at her Ringwood East unit in 1994.

Ms Membrey was last seen leaving the Manhattan Hotel in Ringwood in Melbourne’s east, where she worked as bartender, on December 6, 1994.

Her body has never been found.

This morning Bond stayed impassive as the verdicts were delivered.

The judge thanked the Membrey and Bond families for the way they carried themselves.

The accused’s mother Nola Bond and father Les entered the dock and hugged their son as mother and son wept.

At the beginning of the trial, the Crown criticised initial police investigations of Ms Membrey’s disappearance as biased and flawed and Mr Bond’s defence said there were no witnesses, DNA or fingerprint evidence linking him to the alleged crime.

In evidence given during the trial, father Roger Membrey told the jury of he and his wife’s growing concern when they went to their daughter’s unit after her disappearance and found blood.

Mr Membrey told the Supreme Court he recalled going to his daughter’s Ringwood unit with his wife Joy after phone messages went unanswered on December 7, 1994.

Elisabeth had failed to attend a doctor’s appointment that day, the jury was told.

“We were getting a bit concerned because the girls didn’t seem to be there, they weren’t answering, and the place was in darkness,” Mr Membrey said.

They managed to get inside the unit.

“We were pleased to see that everything was neat and tidy . . . so it all looked very normal, but there was one exception to that, of course,” he said.

That exception was a pool of dried blood in the hallway. Mr Membrey said he rang 000 and taxi services to see if an ambulance or cabs had been called to the home.

“It was all negative, negative,” Mr Membrey said.

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Matthew Johnson Found Guilty of Murdering Carl Williams


Matthew Johnson has been found guilty of Murder

UPDATE 08/12/11 Sentencing today

R v Matthew Charles Johnson (sentence)
Melbourne Court 4, 11:00am
Justice Lex Lasry

Johnson is set for sentencing at 11am (now) But Justice Lex Lasry will go through the crime and circumstances before he actually sentences him. Hopefully he will do that within an hour or 2….They like to go on a bit…

I expect the last words Johnson will hear before being carted back to Barwon will be life Imprisonment, and then as it will be his final appearance he will leave the judge with some fine words of wisdom…

Anyway I will put an update as soon as I get the info, I was thinking about going in for it, but apparently the scumbag’s loser friends don’t think that highly of me I hear….haha

Matthew Johnson Found Guilty of Murdering Carl Williams

Justice Lasry has just adjourned the court until tomorrow morning at 9.30am when further administrative applications will be heard and considered. Johnson has now been remanded to Barwon Prison until further hearing on plea and sentence.

MORE TO COME 3.50pm 29/09/11 scroll down to read what the jury didnt know about this KILLER

CARL Williams’ killer Matthew Charles Johnson has been found guilty of his murder.

The verdict was reached just before 3.23pm today after deliberations that took over 13 hours over two days.

The violent career criminal bashed the gangland identity to death with an exercise bike stem in a surprise attack caught on chilling security video.

But staff weren’t manning the cameras that captured Johnson approaching Williams, 39, from behind as he sat at a table reading the Herald Sun in his high-security Barwon prison unit on April 19 last year.

Johnson, 38, told the jury he acted in self-defence, claiming another prisoner warned him that Williams was going to attack him with a sock full of billiard balls so he had to get in first.

But a Supreme Court jury’s verdict means they didn’t believe the threat was ever made.

The trial sat for 14 days and heard explosive allegations made by Williams before his death, including that a corrupt policeman paid him to have police informer Terence Hodson executed.

The prosecution had argued that Johnson’s motive might have been Williams’ agreement to help police over the Hodson murder.

The jury weren’t told Johnson has well over 100 convictions, has spent most of his adult life in prison and has a history of bashing other inmates for “turning dog” or helping authorities.

The Premier and the General

A former concreter who didn’t finish high school, Johnson was a jail heavyweight and self-proclaimed “general” of a group of inmates who called themselves the Prisoners of War.

He wrote of his plans to kill Williams the day before he did, telling another inmate, “not much doing here brother, just D2TE (death to the enemy) the way it should be”.

“I think I’ll have to hang around for a while longer … doesn’t matter but coz I love this s—. I am the true general so I must keep things in good order, true.”

He told nobody of the threat by Williams and the man who allegedly conveyed the message, cellmate Tommy Ivanovic, did not give evidence at the trial.

Johnson claimed Williams treated him badly, looked down on him and told him he was disloyal for refusing to kill a policeman for him.

He said he feared retribution for his family outside if he reacted to Williams’ provocation.

“He was a killer. If you’re not going to take a threat that comes from his corner seriously there’s something wrong with you,” he told the jury.

The trial heard evidence from Williams’ father George, who once shared the unit with Williams and Johnson before his release on parole, and Roberta Williams.

The jury also heard details of Williams’ claims of high-reaching police corruption, including that former drug squad detective Paul Dale paid him to have Hodson killed so the informer would not be able to give evidence in Dale’s court case.

VIDEO FROM INSIDE THE UNIT THE DAY CARL WAS MURDERED

AUDIO SECRETLY RECORDED INSIDE JAIL DURING VISITS

 

WHAT THE JURY DID NOT KNOW AT THE TRIAL

THE jury in the Matthew Johnson trial knew he was a criminal, but heard nothing of his frighteningly violent past.

More than a decade before he bashed Williams to death, he’d committed a strikingly similar crime in the very same unit of Barwon Prison – and claimed self-defence that time too.

And recently he faced a murder charge after an 18-year-old was shot dead over $50 worth of cannabis. That time, the jury believed him and he was cleared.

In 1998, he was part of a group of inmates that attacked a fellow prisoner for “giving information” to authorities – and used the same weapon he killed Williams with.

The victim of that beating, killer Greg Brazel, had been put into an Acacia unit exercise yard alone for his own safety.

But even prison walls were no match for Johnson and his cronies, who were set on attacking him.

Using a rowing machine and chair, the group pounded the armoured glass protecting Brazel for 45 minutes until they broke through, with Johnson then wielding a sandwich maker to inflict large gashes to his head.

A sandwich maker was something Johnson admitted to the jury he’d also considered using to kill Williams.

A prison officer reported seeing him use an exercise bike seat with the post attached to hit Brazel before punching and kicking him on the ground.

He ordered one of the others to stand guard and stop prison officers entering.

When charged over the assault, Johnson claimed Brazel had broken the glass himself and invited Johnson to enter before attacking him.

Johnson said he was forced to hit and kick him in self-defence.

During the County Court trial the group threw a bag of excrement into the jury box and Johnson broke wind into a microphone.

Later, Johnson menacingly called out to the juror that had been struck by the excrement – by name.

They were banished from their own hearing to watch proceedings from another room linked by video camera.

There his co-offenders bared their buttocks at the camera and the group disrupted the hearing with the Collingwood theme song.

Johnson was also involved in bashing another prisoner in 1995 after breaking into a protection unit.

By the time of the Brazel attack he had already racked up 132 convictions.

His shocking record includes taking part in the infamous Port Phillip Prison riot in 1998, armed robberies and break-ins.

He was accused of shooting dead a teenager in 2007 over a $50 drug purchase.

“Before the deceased could explain himself, Johnson pulled out a nine millimetre pistol and shot him in the chest,” the jury was told in that trial, with a co-offender giving evidence that he saw Johnson pull the trigger.

He was found not guilty of the crime. Johnson also recently pleaded guilty over a carjacking, in which he held up a mother and two teenagers at gunpoint as they sat in a McDonald’s car park

More here about that killing here http://aussiecriminals.wordpress.com/2010/10/19/matthew-johnson-killed-kid-over-50-drugs/#comment-13873

(Including some great debate and comment)

Carl "The Premier" Williams Cell

Once an exercise bike, now part of a crime scene

Who had the balls to kill who?

Casey Anthony Verdict In NOT GUILTY


This is massive, less than a day and a half deliberations after 3 years getting to trial and 8 weeks, 300 pieces of evidence and nearly 100 witnesses Verdict to be read at 2.15 Orlando time Aust time 4.15am NOT GUILTY except for lying to law enforcement.SPEECHLESS AFTER WATCHING EVERY MINUTE LIVE

Cindy and George Anthony, parents of Casey Anthony, are the first to leave the courtroom, with their attorney Mark Lippman, after their daughter was found not guilty in her 1st-degree murder trial, at the Orange County Courthouse, in Orlando, Fla., Tuesday, July 5, 2011.

Casey Anthony reacts to being found not guilty on murder charges at the Orange County Courthouse Orlando, Fla. on July 5, 2011. At left is her attorney Jose Baez. On the right is attorney Dorothy Clay Sims.

ORANGE COUNTY, Fla. — Casey Anthony was found not guilty Tuesday of killing her 2-year-old daughter, Caylee Marie Anthony, in a case that captivated the nation as it played out on national television from the moment the toddler was reported missing three years ago.

Officials said Casey is back in the Orange County jail and remains in protective custody.

“As to the charge, first-degree murder, we the jury find the defendant not guilty,” read the court clerk.

Casey, 25, wept after the clerk read the verdict, which jurors reached after less than 11 hours of deliberation over two days. She was charged with first-degree murder, which could have brought the death penalty if she had been convicted.

Instead, she was convicted of only four counts of lying to investigators looking into the June 2008 disappearance of her daughter Caylee. Her body was found in the woods six months later and a medical examiner was never able to determine how she died.

Casey will be sentenced by Judge Belvin Perry on Thursday and could receive up to one year in jail for each lying count.

After the verdict was read, Casey hugged her attorney Jose Baez and later mouthed the words “thank you” to him. Prosecutor Jeff Ashton, meanwhile, shook his head in disbelief.

Casey’s parents, Cindy and George Anthony left the courtroom without speaking to her as the judge thanked the jury.

“While we’re happy for Casey, there are no winners in this case,” Baez said at a news conference after the hearing. “Caylee has passed on far, far too soon and what my driving force has been for the last three years has been always to make sure that there has been justice for Caylee and Casey because Casey did not murder Caylee. It’s that simple. And today our system of justice has not dishonored her memory by a false conviction.”

Casey’s attorneys claimed that Caylee drowned accidentally in the family swimming pool, and that her seemingly carefree mother in fact was hiding emotional distress caused by sexual abuse from her father.

Prosecutors contended that Caylee was suffocated with duct tape by a mother who loved to party, tattooed herself with the Italian words for “beautiful life” in the month her daughter was missing and crafted elaborate lies to mislead everyone from investigators to her own parents.

Captivated observers camped outside the courthouse to jockey for coveted seats in the courtroom gallery, which occasionally led to fights among those desperate to watch the drama unfold.

Casey did not take the stand during the trial, which started in mid-May. Because the case got so much media attention in Orlando, jurors were brought in from the Tampa Bay area and sequestered for the entire trial.

Baez conceded that his client had told elaborate lies and invented imaginary friends and even a fake father for Caylee, but he said that doesn’t mean she killed her daughter. “They throw enough against the wall and see what sticks,” Baez said of prosecutors during closing arugments. “That is what they’re doing … right down to the cause of death.”

He tried to convince jurors that Caylee accidentally drowned in the family swimming pool and that when Casey panicked, her father, a former police officer, decided to make the death look like a murder by putting duct tape on the girl’s mouth and dumping the body in woods about a quarter-mile away.

Her father firmly denied both the cover-up and abuse claims. The prosecution called those claims “absurd,” saying that no one makes an accident look like a murder.

Lead prosecutor Linda Drane-Burdick concluded the state’s case by showing the jury two side-by-side images. One showed Casey smiling and partying in a nightclub during the month Caylee was missing. The other was the tattoo she got a day before her family and law enforcement first learned of the child’s disappearance.

“At the end of this case, all you have to ask yourself is whose life was better without Caylee?” Burdick asked. “This is your answer.”

Prosecutors hammered on the lies Casey, then 22, told from June 16, 2008, when her daughter was last seen, and a month later when sheriff’s investigators were notified. Those include the single mother telling her parents she couldn’t produce Caylee because the girl was with a nanny named Zenaida Gonzalez, (Zanny) a woman who doesn’t exist; that she and her daughter were spending time in Jacksonville, Fla., with a rich boyfriend who doesn’t exist; and that Zanny had been hospitalized after an out-of-town traffic crash and that they were spending time with her.

DAY 47: Casey Walks In, Judge Dismisses Jury
IN COURT: Casey, Attorneys, Judge
BAEZ JOKES AROUND: Raw Video | See Images
MOTION: On Zenaida Gonzalez Lawsuit
EVIDENCE ARCHIVE: Casey Anthony Case
CASEY COVERAGE On Twitter | On Facebook

Judge Belvin Perry says he will read the verdict at 2:15 p.m. EDT Tuesday.

The Florida jury deliberated for more than 10 hours. If convicted of first-degree murder, 25-year-old Casey could get a death sentence.

She could also be acquitted or convicted of second-degree murder or manslaughter.

She is also charged with lying to sheriff’s detectives investigating her daughter’s 2008 disappearance.

Previous Stories:

Former investigator Mark Standen on Trial on drug charges


UPDATE 08/12/11

DISGRACED crime fighter Mark Standen will spend at least 16 years behind bars for his role in a drug importation conspiracy plot.

The former assistant director of investigations at the NSW Crime Commission was in August found guilty by a Supreme Court jury of plotting to import 300kg of pseudoepherine.

He will not be eligible for parole until June 2024, with Justice Bruce James taking into account that Standen has been in custody since his arrest in June 2008.

He was also convicted of taking part in the supply of the supply of 300kg of the substance, used in the manufacture of the illicit drugs speed and ice.

Justice Bruce James said in his sentencing remarks this morning that Standen had conspired with his informant, drug trafficker James Kinch and food wholesaler Bakhos “Bill” Jalalaty from between January 2006 and June 2008 to import the substance.

Related Coverage

The court heard the drugs were to be placed inside a shipping container filled with rice that would travel to Australia from Pakistan.

Justice James said that Standen “used his personal contacts (including those working at Customs) to make enquiries for the purpose of ascertaining whether the shipment of rice had come to the attention of authorities.”

The court heard it was an “abuse” of his role at the NSW Crime Commission.

“One of his duties (at work) was to investigate drug trafficking, the criminal conduct of the very sort in which he engaged,” Justice James.

Standen’s two brothers were at Darlinghurst courthouse to hear his fate this morning.

The Judge described Standen’s relationship his informant Kinch as one which “irretrievably” corrupted him.
His sentence followed a five-month trial that began in March this year.

FOLLOWING THE TRIAL OF THIS FORMER TOP COP’S DRUG TRIAL

Former investigator in court on drug charge

March 15, 2011

Mark Standen, from top investigator to Drug Player

A FORMER assistant director of investigations at the NSW Crime Commission, Mark William Standen, allegedly conspired with two men, including a former informant, to import pseudoephedrine.

Mr Standen is also accused of taking part in the supply of 300 kilograms of the substance, and of conspiring to pervert the course of justice. All the offences allegedly occurred between January 2006 and early June 2008. He has pleaded not guilty.

A jury of six men and six women, sworn in at the Sydney Supreme Court yesterday, were told he allegedly conspired to import pseudoephedrine, believing it would be used in the manufacture of a prohibited drug.

The crown prosecutor Tim Game, SC, told the jury Mr Standen was accused of conspiring with two others, James Kinch, a former informant of Mr Standen, and Bakhos Jalalaty, a businessman. One business, BJ’s Fine Foods, was based at a Blacktown warehouse.

It is also alleged Mr Standen attempted to assist Mr Jalalaty to try to obtain possession of the substance in the warehouse, to take part in its supply and that he conspired to use his position or knowledge to help divert attention from the importation, and by instructing Mr Jalalaty what to say if he was arrested.

The jury was told the trial would take about eight weeks and might hear evidence from 45 witnesses, more than half of them law enforcement officers, including officers of the NSW Crime Commission.

Justice Bruce James told the jury the first few weeks of the trial would involve the playing of telephone calls and material from listening devices, and the reading of emails.

The judge also told the jury it was an offence to research the case on the internet, and he urged them not to communicate via Twitter or other social media. The trial is due to start on Wednesday.

Ex-top policeman received $100,000 in cash, court hears

March 16, 2011

The former assistant director of investigations for the NSW Crime Commission allegedly participated in a criminal agreement to import pseudoephedrine for financial reasons, the Crown prosecutor told the NSW Supreme Court in Sydney today.

Mark William Standen allegedly received more than $100,000 in cash from a former Crime Commission informer James Kinch. He was in “desperate” need of money, the court heard.

Mr Kinch allegedly provided more than $1 million to their accused co-conspirator, Bakhos Jalalaty, who owned a food business. It was not stated in court when this payment was made.

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Mr Jalalaty invested about $580,000 of the funds in an investment company, but lost it, the jury was told.

A first shipment, containing rice, was a test run, and did not contain any pseudoephedrine, the prosecution alleges.

While Mr Standen and Mr Jalalaty believed a second shipment, which arrived in April 2008, was “the live one”, meaning it contained the prohibited substance, no pseudoephedrine was found by authorities, Crown prosecutor Tim Game, SC, said.

He said pseudoephedrine could be used to manufacture speed or ice with the addition of other substances including acetone.

Mr Jalalaty had allegedly stored 1000 litres of acetone in his warehouse on behalf of Mr Kinch, but sold it in November 2007 at a loss, he said.

Mr Standen is facing three charges and has pleaded not guilty.

Mr Game has finished his opening and Mr Standen’s barrister Mark Ierace, SC, is to address the jury this afternoon.

Standen used office to question investor

Geesche Jacobsen

March 18, 2011

Mark Standen, arrested in his office by AFP

FORMER senior Crime Commission investigator Mark Standen questioned a man in his office about a $580,000 investment by the businessman Bakhos Jalalaty which the man had allegedly lost, the jury in his trial heard.

Details of the attempts by Mr Standen to help Mr Jalalaty recover the money – including by hiring an American debt collector, and a man called Roger – were contained in a series of phone calls played in the Supreme Court yesterday.

Mr Jalalaty had allegedly been given more than $1 million by a former Crime Commission informer, James Kinch, to build up his business as a ”front” for the importation of pseudoephedrine Mr Standen, Mr Jalalaty and Mr Kinch were allegedly planning.

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In one call intercepted by police, Mr Jalalaty told Mr Standen he had spoken to Roger about plans to follow home Bruce Way, the man with whom he had invested the money.

In another call, Mr Standen told Mr Jalalaty the debt collector had brought Mr Way into his office and had questioned him about the alleged fraud and Mr Way had provided details of his business partners overseas. ”We had a little chat … [but] it does not sound very promising,” Mr Standen said.

Later, Mr Standen told Mr Jalalaty he could ”ask the right questions” but said: ”I can’t use my position to do anything.” When Mr Jalalaty suggested there was a ”good way or a bad way” to recover the money, Mr Standen said: ”I don’t want to know.”

In later calls Mr Jalalaty is heard discussing financial difficulties with his wife, saying he needed to get $500,000, allegedly to repay Mr Kinch, while he is still seeking to recover the money invested with Mr Way.

The jury was also shown a fax sent to Mr Jalalaty by an allegedly fictitious company, MDL Food & Services India, in June 2007. The fax said the company – allegedly linked to the Dutch drug syndicate – had sent him samples of salt, coconut powder and other items.

The trial continues.

Way back when he was arrested in June 2nd 2008 this story ran

A DRUG cop arrested for allegedly plotting to produce mass amounts of “ice” has a gambling problem, the NSW Crime Commission says.

Mark Standen, one of the NSW Crime Commission’s most senior criminal investigators, was arrested at his desk in Sydney yesterday over his alleged role in trying to import enough ephedrine chemicals to produce more than $120 million worth of ice.

Mr Standen is due to face Sydney’s Central Local Court today charged with conspiring to import 600kg of pseudoephedrine to be illegally used to manufacture the drug ice.

NSW Crime Commissioner Phillip Bradley said Standen has a gambling problem.

“Yes, recently we became aware of that,” he told reporters in Sydney.

Mr Bradley said a number of cases Standen had worked on while under investigation would be reviewed, but denied there was a need for a royal commission.

“It’s very damaging, there’s no doubt about that,” he said at AFP headquarters.

“This is an isolated incident, one person engaging in crime,” he alleged.

Mr Bradley said he would not be standing aside from his position, and was not aware of any prosecution that had been compromised.

“I’m not aware of any basis for a retrial,” he said.Mr Standen, 51, is accused of working with a criminal syndicate in the Netherlands to bring in the chemicals hidden in a consignment of rice.

Australian Federal Police arrested Mr Standen as part of a series of co-ordinated raids in Europe, Thailand and Sydney.

Last week about 150 police, including six SWAT teams, raided homes and offices in four cities in the Netherlands and arrested 11 suspected senior drug criminals.

The AFP put the NSW Crime Commission building in lockdown yesterday as they raided Mr Standen’s office, also seizing documents.

Mr Standen and Sydney food importer Bill Jellatly, 40, were being held in custody and questioned late last night.

In a bizarre twist, the drug-making chemicals never made it to Australia, with a rival Pakistani criminal group suspected of double-crossing the plotters and offloading the haul before it was shipped to Australia.

It is believed the arrest for alleged conspiracy to import drugs follows hundreds of hours of telephone taps.

It is alleged Mr Standen used his position and knowledge of international crime to establish the best way to smuggle in the ingredients to make ice, knowing which cargo containers are searched and how to evade the latest crime-fighting technology.

He has sat in on confidential national law enforcement meetings with police chiefs, which every month discuss the latest organised crime and illicit drug intelligence.

Mr Standen, who police codenamed “Rupert”, has worked in law enforcement for almost 30 years, including for the AFP, which he left 12 years ago; Customs; the National Crime Authority; and the NSW Crime Commission, where he has held a senior and trusted position for almost a decade.

It is alleged he linked up with a Sydney food importer and well-known British identity James Henry Kinch – codenamed “Echo” – who was arrested on the weekend about to board a flight from Bangkok to Germany.

NSW Crime Commission chiefs were yesterday in shock at the possibility of such a high-security breach of the intelligence.

The AFP had been tracking the operation for more than a year after it was uncovered by Dutch officials two years ago.

Such was the international nature of the crime, police in the Netherlands and Australia liaised with police from the United Kingdom, the United States, Pakistan, the United Arab Emirates, Thailand and Singapore to follow the movements of the men and their haul.

Judy Moran GUILTY of MURDER


GANGLAND widow Judy Moran has been found guilty of murder over the killing of her brother-in-law Des “Tuppence’” Moran.

Found guilty of Murder this morning...Bye bye Judy

Moran, 66, bowed her head and became teary as the foreman announced the verdict in the Supreme Court

It took the jury of nine men and three women six days to reach their decision after a month-long trial.

Ex Rebels bikie president Geoffrey “Nuts” Armour shot Des Moran, 61, inside his favourite Ascot Vale cafe in front of several witnesses on June 15, 2009.

The jury was told Judy Moran drove Armour and his friend turned prosecution witness Michael Farrugia to and from the scene and later disposed of evidence.

Prosecutor Mark Rochford, SC, told the jury the plot was an agreement between Judy Moran and Armour due to an on-going financial dispute.

“This was a planned and calculated murder motivated by (Judy) Moran…and an on-going financial dispute with (Des Moran),” Mr Rochford alleged in his opening address.

Farrugia, who told the trial he thought he was helping Armour on a debt-collecting mission, gave evidence against Judy Moran.

In sworn testimony he said she was the driver and told the two men she would get rid of evidence after the shooting.

Moran had pleaded not guilty to murder and accessory after the fact.

She gave evidence herself, claiming she was at Fawkner Cemetery visiting her son Mark’s grave on the morning of Tuppence’s murder – which was the day of the ninth anniversary of Mark’s death.
“Obviously you don’t know me as a person,” she told Mr Rochford while under cross examination.

“I wouldn’t be involved in anything like that at my age now – let alone all the other 60 years.”

The jury did not believe her.

Detectives arrested Moran after she drove the getaway car from her garage and dumped it in a Brunswick street while wearing gloves.

After arresting Moran, detectives searched her house and found the murder weapon and clothing linked to Armour and Farrugia stuffed in a hidden safe.

Justice Lex Lasry will sentence Moran on a date to be fixed.

Before the trial, Farrugia, 46, pleaded guilty to manslaughter and received four years’ jail with a two-year minimum term.

Armour, 45, has pleaded guilty to murder and is yet to be sentenced.

His de facto, Suzanne Kane, 47, pleaded guilty to being an accessory after the fact and received a suspended sentence due to time served while on remand.

Opening Day of Judy Moran's trial at the Supreme Court (as well as updates)


I will be doing a running update each day of this trial.I will be going to more than a few days and hopefully sneak out any surprises via iPhone during the trial. If she was hoping to get any sympathy rocking up in a wheelchair/scooter she must be kidding herself. She was up to her neck in the planning and execution of this murder from the start. jealousy and greed at the bottom of it.Yet we must go through costly trial to reveal what we already know…

 

Update 21/02/11 Now it is bad people hiding cars involved in the murder in her garage??? OMG

UPDATE 2.05pm: JUDY Moran has told a jury “bad people” put the getaway car used in the murder of her brother-in-law Des Moran in the garage of her home after the killing. Under cross examination by Mark Rochford, SC, Mrs Moran today said she had never seen the car before the night of the murder on June 15, 2009.

“I’d never seen it before until the 15th in the evening,” Mrs Moran said.

Mr Rochford said: “Until you went out in the evening – there it is magically in your garage?”

Mrs Moran replied: “Not magically sir. Bad people put it there.”

Update 18/02/11 I never laughed so much as I did today when she  spoke !!! Is this the best she has…I am going on Monday to laugh some more at her face to face…


JUDY Moran has today told a jury her relative Suzanne Kane told her the getaway car used in the murder of Des Moran was sitting in her garage only hours after the slaying.

During her evidence in chief today, Mrs Moran told the jury she was not feeling well on the night of the murder and then Kane told her the news about a gun being in her wardrobe and the car being in her garage.

“I said, ‘What?’” Mrs Moran told the court.

“I had a big row with her…I said I wanted her out of my house.

“I said, ‘This is absolutely disgusting, Suzanne. You’ve been in my family for so many years, you should know better.’

”And I said, ‘Why would you involve me?’

“I thought, ‘I’ve got to get these things out of my house.”

Mrs Moran said she later dumped the car in a nearby street while wearing “little soft gloves” so as not to leave fingerprints.

Detective Mark Hatt arrested her at the scene.

Defence barrister Bill Stuart today asked Mrs Moran: “Were you intending in any way by getting that car out of the house, to assist anybody in committing a crime?”

Mrs Moran replied: “Definitely no, no. No, I was angry. I am still angry with Suzanne.”

The 66-year-old is accused of driving gunman Geoff Armour and another man, Michael Farrugia, to and from the Des Moran hit at an Ascot Vale café on June 15, 2009, and later disposing of evidence.

It is alleged she wore a pink knitted headband and a bright red windcheater when she allegedly drove the two men to and from the murder.

While she denies driving the two, in court she said of the clothing: “I would never wear that headband with that – with red anyway.”

Prosecutor Mark Rochford, SC, asked Mrs Moran why she did not ring detectives who had earlier been at her home and tell them about the location of the getaway car in her garage.

“I just wanted it out of my house,” Mrs Moran said.

Mrs Moran has pleaded not guilty to murder and being an accessory after the fact.

The trial, before Justice Lex Lasry, continues Monday.

Judy Moran, when she had access to a hair dresser

JUDY Moran was involved in an agreement with Geoffrey Armour – the man who shot Desmond Moran dead at an Ascot Vale café – and participated in the killing by performing certain acts, a Supreme Court jury has been told.

In his opening address in the murder trial of Mrs Moran, prosecutor Mark Rochford, SC, today told the jury it was a deliberate killing and that Mrs Moran drove Armour, and another man – Michael Farrugia – to and from the murder scene and assisted in the disposal of evidence.

The court was told Farrugia, who believed he was helping on a debt collecting mission on the day of the shooting, will be called as a Crown witness during the trial.

Mr Rochford told the jury the planned killing was the result of an on-going financial dispute between Mrs Moran and Des “Tuppence” Moran, whom she believed had certain funds she was entitled to.

The jury heard there was a “level of animosity” between Mrs Moran and the victim.

The court was told that Armour had been linked to a previous shooting incident during which a gunman fired a bullet into Des Moran’s car as he and a mate sat inside.

The jury heard Armour and his de facto, Suzanne Kane, were staying with Mrs Moran at her home when Des Moran was shot dead on June 15, 2009.

Mr Rochford said Mrs Moran took out a $400,000 bank loan in May, had a company called Environmental Concrete Constructions set up, and purchased expensive vehicles for Armour and Kane in the lead up to the fatal shooting.

The court heard that Armour and Farrugia were friends who spent time fishing and shooting clay targets.

Mr Rochford said Armour bought a Ford Fairlane through a contact of Farrugia’s, and that car was later used during the murder.

The jury heard that evidence, such as telephone intercepts and CCTV footage, would be presented during the trial.

According to Mr Rochford, Mrs Moran left one message on Armour’s phone stating “murder on” only days before the killing, and in another spoke in code about Des Moran’s whereabouts.

In the days before the killing, Farrugia went shooting with Armour who had a bag full of handguns, Mr Rochford said.

The jury was told that, according to Farrugia, Mrs Moran said “there’s the bastard”as they drove past the deli.

It was then, the jury heard, that Armour told Farrugia they were there to do some debt collecting.

But, the jury heard, Farrugia was later told to stay in the car but followed followed Armour who shot Des Moran several times with a Glock pistol, complete with an attached laser sight.

Mr Rochford said that back in the car after the killing, according to Farrugia, Mrs Moran asked Armour, “Did you get him?”

Mr Armour is alleged to have replied: “Yeah, no worries. I got him.”

The jury was told that Mrs Moran appeared to be happy and said she would look after everything, and later threatened Farrugia to keep his mouth shut or the same thing would happen to him.

Mr Rochford said that after going to the scene appearing upset, Mrs Moran told police she was at Fawkner Cemetery visiting her son Mark’s grave at the time of Des Moran’s murder.

She was arrested that night after driving the Ford Fairlane from her garage and leaving it in a nearby street.

The court heard police found guns – including the murder weapon – and clothing linked to Armour and Farrugia in a hidden safe at Mrs Moran’s house.

Bill Stuart, for Mrs Moran, said she was at Fawkner Cemetery tending to Mark’s grave – as it was the anniversary of his death nine years earlier – and that she had no involvement in the murder.

He said his client did not utter the words “murder on” in a message to Armour, but instead said “murderer” because he had been kangaroo shooting.

“Judy Moran…was not party to any agreement or enterprise to harm, let alone kill, Desmond Moran,” Mr Stuart told the jury.

The first witness is expected to give evidence tomorrow.

Related Articles

Day 2

JUDY Moran looked happy and patted a gunman on the back as she drove a getaway car after Des Moran was shot.

The Crown told the jury that Michael Farrugia, a second man in the car who was present at the shooting, would say he heard Mrs Moran ask gunman Geoffrey Armour, “Did you get him?”

It is alleged Armour replied, “Yeah, no worries. I got him”.

In his opening address at Mrs Moran’s murder trial yesterday, prosecutor Mark Rochford, SC, said: “Judy Moran congratulated Armour by saying, ‘Well done.’ She appeared to be very happy about it.

“In fact, she was patting him on the back.”

Des “Tuppence” Moran was shot dead in an Ascot Vale delicatessen on June 15, 2009.

The jury heard he was killed in a plot between between Mrs Moran and Armour, who called her “mum”.

“This was a planned and calculated murder motivated by (Judy) Moran . . . and an on-going financial dispute with the deceased man,” Mr Rochford said.

“She had a dislike for the deceased. She became concerned and suspected that he had other funds or property from (the late) Lewis Moran to which she believed she was entitled.”

The Crown alleges Mrs Moran drove Armour and Farrugia to and from the murder, and later assisted by disposing of evidence.

Mr Rochford said Mrs Moran left a phone message on Armour’s phone four days earlier, saying “murder on”.

It was alleged Mrs Moran said “there’s the bastard” as she, Armour and Farrugia drove past the Union Rd deli on the day of the murder, before returning.

Armour, wearing a wig and with Farrugia in tow, shot Des Moran with a laser-sight Glock pistol, the jury heard.

The court heard Farrugia, believing he was on a debt-collecting mission, had minutes earlier asked Mrs Moran, “What’s going on? What’s with the wig?”

She later told Farrugia to keep his “f—ing mouth shut” or the same thing would happen to him, the court heard.

The jury was told Farrugia would be called as a prosecution witness.

Mrs Moran was arrested after allegedly driving the getaway car from her garage to a nearby street.

The court heard police found evidence, including the murder weapon, in a safe hidden at her house.

Defence barrister Bill Stuart said Mrs Moran was at Fawkner Cemetery visiting her son Mark’s grave, on the ninth anniversary of his death, at the time of Des Moran’s murder.

Mr Stuart said his client did not utter the words “murder on” in a phone message to Armour, but instead said “murderer” because Armour had been kangaroo shooting.

Mrs Moran, 66, has pleaded not guilty to murder and to being an accessory after the fact.

The trial, before Justice Lex Lasry, continues.

Opening Day of Judy Moran’s trial at the Supreme Court (as well as updates)


I will be doing a running update each day of this trial.I will be going to more than a few days and hopefully sneak out any surprises via iPhone during the trial. If she was hoping to get any sympathy rocking up in a wheelchair/scooter she must be kidding herself. She was up to her neck in the planning and execution of this murder from the start. jealousy and greed at the bottom of it.Yet we must go through costly trial to reveal what we already know…

 

Update 21/02/11 Now it is bad people hiding cars involved in the murder in her garage??? OMG

UPDATE 2.05pm: JUDY Moran has told a jury “bad people” put the getaway car used in the murder of her brother-in-law Des Moran in the garage of her home after the killing. Under cross examination by Mark Rochford, SC, Mrs Moran today said she had never seen the car before the night of the murder on June 15, 2009.

“I’d never seen it before until the 15th in the evening,” Mrs Moran said.

Mr Rochford said: “Until you went out in the evening – there it is magically in your garage?”

Mrs Moran replied: “Not magically sir. Bad people put it there.”

Update 18/02/11 I never laughed so much as I did today when she  spoke !!! Is this the best she has…I am going on Monday to laugh some more at her face to face…


JUDY Moran has today told a jury her relative Suzanne Kane told her the getaway car used in the murder of Des Moran was sitting in her garage only hours after the slaying.

During her evidence in chief today, Mrs Moran told the jury she was not feeling well on the night of the murder and then Kane told her the news about a gun being in her wardrobe and the car being in her garage.

“I said, ‘What?’” Mrs Moran told the court.

“I had a big row with her…I said I wanted her out of my house.

“I said, ‘This is absolutely disgusting, Suzanne. You’ve been in my family for so many years, you should know better.’

”And I said, ‘Why would you involve me?’

“I thought, ‘I’ve got to get these things out of my house.”

Mrs Moran said she later dumped the car in a nearby street while wearing “little soft gloves” so as not to leave fingerprints.

Detective Mark Hatt arrested her at the scene.

Defence barrister Bill Stuart today asked Mrs Moran: “Were you intending in any way by getting that car out of the house, to assist anybody in committing a crime?”

Mrs Moran replied: “Definitely no, no. No, I was angry. I am still angry with Suzanne.”

The 66-year-old is accused of driving gunman Geoff Armour and another man, Michael Farrugia, to and from the Des Moran hit at an Ascot Vale café on June 15, 2009, and later disposing of evidence.

It is alleged she wore a pink knitted headband and a bright red windcheater when she allegedly drove the two men to and from the murder.

While she denies driving the two, in court she said of the clothing: “I would never wear that headband with that – with red anyway.”

Prosecutor Mark Rochford, SC, asked Mrs Moran why she did not ring detectives who had earlier been at her home and tell them about the location of the getaway car in her garage.

“I just wanted it out of my house,” Mrs Moran said.

Mrs Moran has pleaded not guilty to murder and being an accessory after the fact.

The trial, before Justice Lex Lasry, continues Monday.

Judy Moran, when she had access to a hair dresser

JUDY Moran was involved in an agreement with Geoffrey Armour – the man who shot Desmond Moran dead at an Ascot Vale café – and participated in the killing by performing certain acts, a Supreme Court jury has been told.

In his opening address in the murder trial of Mrs Moran, prosecutor Mark Rochford, SC, today told the jury it was a deliberate killing and that Mrs Moran drove Armour, and another man – Michael Farrugia – to and from the murder scene and assisted in the disposal of evidence.

The court was told Farrugia, who believed he was helping on a debt collecting mission on the day of the shooting, will be called as a Crown witness during the trial.

Mr Rochford told the jury the planned killing was the result of an on-going financial dispute between Mrs Moran and Des “Tuppence” Moran, whom she believed had certain funds she was entitled to.

The jury heard there was a “level of animosity” between Mrs Moran and the victim.

The court was told that Armour had been linked to a previous shooting incident during which a gunman fired a bullet into Des Moran’s car as he and a mate sat inside.

The jury heard Armour and his de facto, Suzanne Kane, were staying with Mrs Moran at her home when Des Moran was shot dead on June 15, 2009.

Mr Rochford said Mrs Moran took out a $400,000 bank loan in May, had a company called Environmental Concrete Constructions set up, and purchased expensive vehicles for Armour and Kane in the lead up to the fatal shooting.

The court heard that Armour and Farrugia were friends who spent time fishing and shooting clay targets.

Mr Rochford said Armour bought a Ford Fairlane through a contact of Farrugia’s, and that car was later used during the murder.

The jury heard that evidence, such as telephone intercepts and CCTV footage, would be presented during the trial.

According to Mr Rochford, Mrs Moran left one message on Armour’s phone stating “murder on” only days before the killing, and in another spoke in code about Des Moran’s whereabouts.

In the days before the killing, Farrugia went shooting with Armour who had a bag full of handguns, Mr Rochford said.

The jury was told that, according to Farrugia, Mrs Moran said “there’s the bastard”as they drove past the deli.

It was then, the jury heard, that Armour told Farrugia they were there to do some debt collecting.

But, the jury heard, Farrugia was later told to stay in the car but followed followed Armour who shot Des Moran several times with a Glock pistol, complete with an attached laser sight.

Mr Rochford said that back in the car after the killing, according to Farrugia, Mrs Moran asked Armour, “Did you get him?”

Mr Armour is alleged to have replied: “Yeah, no worries. I got him.”

The jury was told that Mrs Moran appeared to be happy and said she would look after everything, and later threatened Farrugia to keep his mouth shut or the same thing would happen to him.

Mr Rochford said that after going to the scene appearing upset, Mrs Moran told police she was at Fawkner Cemetery visiting her son Mark’s grave at the time of Des Moran’s murder.

She was arrested that night after driving the Ford Fairlane from her garage and leaving it in a nearby street.

The court heard police found guns – including the murder weapon – and clothing linked to Armour and Farrugia in a hidden safe at Mrs Moran’s house.

Bill Stuart, for Mrs Moran, said she was at Fawkner Cemetery tending to Mark’s grave – as it was the anniversary of his death nine years earlier – and that she had no involvement in the murder.

He said his client did not utter the words “murder on” in a message to Armour, but instead said “murderer” because he had been kangaroo shooting.

“Judy Moran…was not party to any agreement or enterprise to harm, let alone kill, Desmond Moran,” Mr Stuart told the jury.

The first witness is expected to give evidence tomorrow.

Related Articles

Day 2

JUDY Moran looked happy and patted a gunman on the back as she drove a getaway car after Des Moran was shot.

The Crown told the jury that Michael Farrugia, a second man in the car who was present at the shooting, would say he heard Mrs Moran ask gunman Geoffrey Armour, “Did you get him?”

It is alleged Armour replied, “Yeah, no worries. I got him”.

In his opening address at Mrs Moran’s murder trial yesterday, prosecutor Mark Rochford, SC, said: “Judy Moran congratulated Armour by saying, ‘Well done.’ She appeared to be very happy about it.

“In fact, she was patting him on the back.”

Des “Tuppence” Moran was shot dead in an Ascot Vale delicatessen on June 15, 2009.

The jury heard he was killed in a plot between between Mrs Moran and Armour, who called her “mum”.

“This was a planned and calculated murder motivated by (Judy) Moran . . . and an on-going financial dispute with the deceased man,” Mr Rochford said.

“She had a dislike for the deceased. She became concerned and suspected that he had other funds or property from (the late) Lewis Moran to which she believed she was entitled.”

The Crown alleges Mrs Moran drove Armour and Farrugia to and from the murder, and later assisted by disposing of evidence.

Mr Rochford said Mrs Moran left a phone message on Armour’s phone four days earlier, saying “murder on”.

It was alleged Mrs Moran said “there’s the bastard” as she, Armour and Farrugia drove past the Union Rd deli on the day of the murder, before returning.

Armour, wearing a wig and with Farrugia in tow, shot Des Moran with a laser-sight Glock pistol, the jury heard.

The court heard Farrugia, believing he was on a debt-collecting mission, had minutes earlier asked Mrs Moran, “What’s going on? What’s with the wig?”

She later told Farrugia to keep his “f—ing mouth shut” or the same thing would happen to him, the court heard.

The jury was told Farrugia would be called as a prosecution witness.

Mrs Moran was arrested after allegedly driving the getaway car from her garage to a nearby street.

The court heard police found evidence, including the murder weapon, in a safe hidden at her house.

Defence barrister Bill Stuart said Mrs Moran was at Fawkner Cemetery visiting her son Mark’s grave, on the ninth anniversary of his death, at the time of Des Moran’s murder.

Mr Stuart said his client did not utter the words “murder on” in a phone message to Armour, but instead said “murderer” because Armour had been kangaroo shooting.

Mrs Moran, 66, has pleaded not guilty to murder and to being an accessory after the fact.

The trial, before Justice Lex Lasry, continues.

You don’t know my dad: Keli Lane’s secret fear


You don’t know my dad: Keli Lane’s secret fear

Under pressure ... Keli Lane (middle) arrives for the first day of her trial in August.

IN MANY ways, Keli Lane was her father’s daughter. Fit, charismatic and sociable, she was following in his footsteps as a gifted athlete. But when her life came crashing down around her, she felt utterly alone.

Police interviews and phone taps released last week shed new light on the extent of the psychological pressure Lane was under. She herself suggested her fate could have been so different if only she hadn’t been too ashamed to seek support from those closest to her.

”This whole, this whole mess is because I didn’t have a thick skin, because I couldn’t ask anyone for help, because I couldn’t stand the embarrassment,” she told her then husband in an intercepted phone call in August 2004.

Keli's father Robert (middle) with fellow champion surfers Mick Dooley and Nat Young at Bondi Beach in 1963.

After a 17-week trial, Lane, 35, was convicted last Monday of the murder of her two-day-old daughter Tegan, who was last seen alive at Auburn Hospital on September 14, 1996.

While the most obvious mystery of the case relates to the last hours of Tegan’s life, another is how Lane’s father, a former police officer and trained observer of human nature, had no idea his daughter had given birth to Tegan and two other children – who were given up for adoption – while under his watchful eye.

On the day Keli was born Robert Lane was so thrilled he shouted the entire Steyne Hotel, and filled the hospital maternity ward with flowers.

The father and daughter outside Westmead Coroners Court in 2005.

Mr Lane was a permanent fixture alongside his daughter as revelations about her hidden pregnancies kept coming during the coronial inquest at Westmead Coroners Court in 2005. Regularly linking arms with his daughter or grasping her hand, he told the inquest he believed Tegan was alive. ”I believe the version Keli has given but I’m not certain of the identity of the people involved.” After she was committed to stand trial last year, Mr Lane stood by his daughter, pledging to forfeit $30,000 if she breached her bail conditions.

Throughout the trial, he has helped shelter Lane’s daughter, now 9, from any news of the proceedings or charges against her mother.

Even on the day of the conviction, Mr Lane was not present in court as he was taking care of his granddaughter at their Fairlight home, according to Lane’s lawyer, Ben Archbold.

And yet police phone intercepts and interviews made public at Lane’s trial demonstrate how terrified she was of him finding out about the pregnancies, the missing child and the police investigation – so much so that she feared he might take away the daughter she gave birth to in 2001 and kept.

In a 2004 police interview, Lane told detectives: ”There’s no way, if my parents found out, that they’ll let me keep her … You don’t know my dad. Can you imagine what he will do?”

Mr Lane did not grant The Sun-Herald’s request for an interview.

A family friend, who refused to be named, said Lane had grown up in ”constant fear” of her disciplinarian father. ”Keli and her brother Morgan were petrified of their dad … She was so scared of failing him, whether it be at school, in sport, anything.”

Mr Lane was an outstanding surfer from Manly in the early days of the sport in Australia. In the 1960s, he, Glynn Ritchie and Nipper Williams – all Manly locals – were known as the ”Bower Boys” because they surfed the reef break at Fairy Bower.

Lane came third to Nat Young and Mick Dooley in the inaugural Australian championships at Bondi Beach in 1963. He was also a talented rugby player, turning out for Manly in the late 1960s and 1970s. In 1981-82 he became the team’s coach. Alan Jones took the helm the following season; Mr Lane returned to the position in 1986-87.

Professionally, he was also rising through the ranks as a career-driven detective at Manly police station. Former player Fred Whiteman described Mr Lane – or ”Moose” as he was then known – as a ”passionate, loyal Manly-ite” who was well respected throughout the area.

Another former club associate described Mr Lane’s coaching style as ”no-nonsense”. The player, who preferred not to be named, said: ”Lane was a real old-style head-kicker. He was a rough, tough copper and that was reflected in his coaching style.”

By the early 1990s, Mr Lane had climbed to the top of Manly’s social ladder. Living in Fairlight, he and his wife Sandra were regular fixtures at parties and functions – and when it came to discussing the children with acquaintances over a glass of champagne the Lanes spoke proudly of the promising futures of Keli and Morgan.

Like her father, Keli loved sport. She was a good swimmer and had found her niche playing water polo. As a member of the Balmain Water Polo Club in the mid-1990s, she was suddenly knocking on the door of the national team, which in turn put her in contention to represent Australia at the 2000 Olympics.

To her father’s delight, she trained hard. But unbeknown to him, she also partied hard, and she never had a problem attracting men.

Having children would have destroyed her Olympic dream, so when she became pregnant five times between 1992 and 1999, Lane addressed the problem clinically. Her first two pregnancies were terminated. Two babies were secretly adopted out, in 1995 and 1999. In between those two births, Lane delivered Tegan on September 12, 1996.

Mother and daughter were discharged from Auburn Hospital two days later. Within hours, Lane was dancing at a friend’s wedding. Tegan had vanished forever.

It took some time for detective senior constables Richard Gaut and Bradley Edgerton to comprehend how Lane could possibly have disguised her pregnancies and births from friends, family and even her long-term lover, footballer Duncan Gillies. Nor did it help that the unco-operative woman under investigation just happened to be the daughter of a renowned retired sergeant who had been based at their station in Manly.

Phone taps soon revealed how aware Lane was of having made ”stupid choices”. They also demonstrated how paralysed she felt by the prospect of telling her father the truth and bringing shame on the family name. The intercepts suggested she had already felt the sting of his disapproval in 2001 when she told him she was pregnant with the daughter she kept.

After a friend tried to console Lane in January 2004, reassuring her that her parents loved her, Lane replied: ”But I don’t think they will after this, do you know what I mean?

I remember dad saying after telling him I was pregnant with [the daughter in 2001], ‘Oh, you can’t top this one Keli,’ and that’s all I keep hearing.”

After finally telling her fiance the truth – weeks before their wedding – Lane informed him how furious her parents were likely to be: ”I’ll cop whatever they say to me … they can call me a slut or a moron or a dickhead or whatever.”

Once Keli’s mother heard the news, she warned that her husband’s reaction would be severe – even advising Lane to keep her young daughter away from the fallout. ”You’ve got to be telling the absolute truth. I’m telling you, because he’ll know how to find out things that you wouldn’t believe.”

Lane said: ”He’s not going to hurt me or anything.”

Her mother said: ”He’s not going to hurt you but he’s going to blow up. You know that, don’t you?”

The phone taps portray a vulnerable woman whose fate might have been different had she felt she could dare to be honest.

”It all seems to be out of my hands, like I really don’t have any choices,” she told her husband over the phone.

”I didn’t have any choices then. I’ve got no choices now.”

 

You don't know my dad: Keli Lane's secret fear


You don’t know my dad: Keli Lane’s secret fear

Under pressure ... Keli Lane (middle) arrives for the first day of her trial in August.

IN MANY ways, Keli Lane was her father’s daughter. Fit, charismatic and sociable, she was following in his footsteps as a gifted athlete. But when her life came crashing down around her, she felt utterly alone.

Police interviews and phone taps released last week shed new light on the extent of the psychological pressure Lane was under. She herself suggested her fate could have been so different if only she hadn’t been too ashamed to seek support from those closest to her.

”This whole, this whole mess is because I didn’t have a thick skin, because I couldn’t ask anyone for help, because I couldn’t stand the embarrassment,” she told her then husband in an intercepted phone call in August 2004.

Keli's father Robert (middle) with fellow champion surfers Mick Dooley and Nat Young at Bondi Beach in 1963.

After a 17-week trial, Lane, 35, was convicted last Monday of the murder of her two-day-old daughter Tegan, who was last seen alive at Auburn Hospital on September 14, 1996.

While the most obvious mystery of the case relates to the last hours of Tegan’s life, another is how Lane’s father, a former police officer and trained observer of human nature, had no idea his daughter had given birth to Tegan and two other children – who were given up for adoption – while under his watchful eye.

On the day Keli was born Robert Lane was so thrilled he shouted the entire Steyne Hotel, and filled the hospital maternity ward with flowers.

The father and daughter outside Westmead Coroners Court in 2005.

Mr Lane was a permanent fixture alongside his daughter as revelations about her hidden pregnancies kept coming during the coronial inquest at Westmead Coroners Court in 2005. Regularly linking arms with his daughter or grasping her hand, he told the inquest he believed Tegan was alive. ”I believe the version Keli has given but I’m not certain of the identity of the people involved.” After she was committed to stand trial last year, Mr Lane stood by his daughter, pledging to forfeit $30,000 if she breached her bail conditions.

Throughout the trial, he has helped shelter Lane’s daughter, now 9, from any news of the proceedings or charges against her mother.

Even on the day of the conviction, Mr Lane was not present in court as he was taking care of his granddaughter at their Fairlight home, according to Lane’s lawyer, Ben Archbold.

And yet police phone intercepts and interviews made public at Lane’s trial demonstrate how terrified she was of him finding out about the pregnancies, the missing child and the police investigation – so much so that she feared he might take away the daughter she gave birth to in 2001 and kept.

In a 2004 police interview, Lane told detectives: ”There’s no way, if my parents found out, that they’ll let me keep her … You don’t know my dad. Can you imagine what he will do?”

Mr Lane did not grant The Sun-Herald’s request for an interview.

A family friend, who refused to be named, said Lane had grown up in ”constant fear” of her disciplinarian father. ”Keli and her brother Morgan were petrified of their dad … She was so scared of failing him, whether it be at school, in sport, anything.”

Mr Lane was an outstanding surfer from Manly in the early days of the sport in Australia. In the 1960s, he, Glynn Ritchie and Nipper Williams – all Manly locals – were known as the ”Bower Boys” because they surfed the reef break at Fairy Bower.

Lane came third to Nat Young and Mick Dooley in the inaugural Australian championships at Bondi Beach in 1963. He was also a talented rugby player, turning out for Manly in the late 1960s and 1970s. In 1981-82 he became the team’s coach. Alan Jones took the helm the following season; Mr Lane returned to the position in 1986-87.

Professionally, he was also rising through the ranks as a career-driven detective at Manly police station. Former player Fred Whiteman described Mr Lane – or ”Moose” as he was then known – as a ”passionate, loyal Manly-ite” who was well respected throughout the area.

Another former club associate described Mr Lane’s coaching style as ”no-nonsense”. The player, who preferred not to be named, said: ”Lane was a real old-style head-kicker. He was a rough, tough copper and that was reflected in his coaching style.”

By the early 1990s, Mr Lane had climbed to the top of Manly’s social ladder. Living in Fairlight, he and his wife Sandra were regular fixtures at parties and functions – and when it came to discussing the children with acquaintances over a glass of champagne the Lanes spoke proudly of the promising futures of Keli and Morgan.

Like her father, Keli loved sport. She was a good swimmer and had found her niche playing water polo. As a member of the Balmain Water Polo Club in the mid-1990s, she was suddenly knocking on the door of the national team, which in turn put her in contention to represent Australia at the 2000 Olympics.

To her father’s delight, she trained hard. But unbeknown to him, she also partied hard, and she never had a problem attracting men.

Having children would have destroyed her Olympic dream, so when she became pregnant five times between 1992 and 1999, Lane addressed the problem clinically. Her first two pregnancies were terminated. Two babies were secretly adopted out, in 1995 and 1999. In between those two births, Lane delivered Tegan on September 12, 1996.

Mother and daughter were discharged from Auburn Hospital two days later. Within hours, Lane was dancing at a friend’s wedding. Tegan had vanished forever.

It took some time for detective senior constables Richard Gaut and Bradley Edgerton to comprehend how Lane could possibly have disguised her pregnancies and births from friends, family and even her long-term lover, footballer Duncan Gillies. Nor did it help that the unco-operative woman under investigation just happened to be the daughter of a renowned retired sergeant who had been based at their station in Manly.

Phone taps soon revealed how aware Lane was of having made ”stupid choices”. They also demonstrated how paralysed she felt by the prospect of telling her father the truth and bringing shame on the family name. The intercepts suggested she had already felt the sting of his disapproval in 2001 when she told him she was pregnant with the daughter she kept.

After a friend tried to console Lane in January 2004, reassuring her that her parents loved her, Lane replied: ”But I don’t think they will after this, do you know what I mean?

I remember dad saying after telling him I was pregnant with [the daughter in 2001], ‘Oh, you can’t top this one Keli,’ and that’s all I keep hearing.”

After finally telling her fiance the truth – weeks before their wedding – Lane informed him how furious her parents were likely to be: ”I’ll cop whatever they say to me … they can call me a slut or a moron or a dickhead or whatever.”

Once Keli’s mother heard the news, she warned that her husband’s reaction would be severe – even advising Lane to keep her young daughter away from the fallout. ”You’ve got to be telling the absolute truth. I’m telling you, because he’ll know how to find out things that you wouldn’t believe.”

Lane said: ”He’s not going to hurt me or anything.”

Her mother said: ”He’s not going to hurt you but he’s going to blow up. You know that, don’t you?”

The phone taps portray a vulnerable woman whose fate might have been different had she felt she could dare to be honest.

”It all seems to be out of my hands, like I really don’t have any choices,” she told her husband over the phone.

”I didn’t have any choices then. I’ve got no choices now.”

 

Keli Lane Media Stuff


Hi all this will contain stuff that was unavailable while the Keli Lane  trial was on as I get my hands on it….cheers

Keli spends first night in Jail

Police Interviews with Keli

Tapped phone call, Keli to her mum

Tapped phone call, Keli to ex Husband (press play below)