AFP get another 135 kg of ICE worth $130m off our streets


Follow the money and the drugs will follow. The minnows they caught with the drugs are disposable, with a queue of guys ready to take their places.

That is a lot of money to the man on the street to lose, but if you haven’t seen the brilliant show called “breaking bad”. The drugs they lost are are a mere few batches away for the big players. Not much else the Australian Federal Police can do.

from the ABC Thu 31 Jul 2014, 9:36am

A joint AFP-ACC raid in Melbourne has netted 135 kilograms of methamphetamine.

A joint AFP-ACC raid in Melbourne has netted 135 kilograms of methamphetamine. (ABC News: Tony Nicholls)

The Australian Federal Police (AFP) have seized 135 kilograms of methamphetamine with a street value of $130 million from a Melbourne apartment.

Police said they located four suitcases containing the drugs in an inner city Melbourne apartment on Tuesday night.

The drugs represent 1.3 million street deals, police said.

The AFP and Australian Crime Commission (ACC) executed search warrants in Melbourne yesterday and arrested four Taiwanese nationals, all aged in their twenties.

Eligo Taskforce since 2012:

  • Aprox $40 million in cash seized
  • Over $800 million of illicit drugs seized
  • $30 million in assets restrained
  • Identified more than 179 targets previously unknown to law enforcement officials
  • Disrupted 25 serious organised crime groups
  • Shut down 18 clandestine drug labs, three of which were commercial scale
  • Raised $12 million in tax assessments with 150 referrals to the ATO for further action on evasion and money laundering.

The seizure and arrests comes after intelligence from the Eligo National Task Force.

AFP Commander Bruce Giles said it was a significant seizure for the country and the state.

“Ice, we see as one of the most dangerous and insidious diseases in our communities and the fact that we have removed over 1.3 million street deals of methamphetamine has got to be good for the Victorian and Australian community,” he said.

“I think in terms of an organised crime syndicate operating in Australia, clearly they will see yet again that agencies cooperate effectively together to join forces to combat the drug trade.”

The four men, Chun Lan, 28, Ming Hsuan Ou and Li Ping Chen, both 23, and Shu Yi Lin, 20, appeared briefly in the Melbourne Magistrates Court just before 1:00pm (AEST).

They were all charged with possessing and trafficking a commercial quantity of a border-controlled drug. The charges carry a maximum penalty of life in prison.

The 135kg of crystal methylamphetamine, or ice, worth about $130 million

The 135kg of crystal methylamphetamine, or ice, worth about $130 million

The court heard the men, who were assisted by a translator, have Australian tourist visas and their arrest yesterday is their first time in custody.

They have been remanded in custody until their next court hearing. Magistrate Jelena Popovic told the men they could apply for bail at any time.

They will return to court on November 5 for a committal mention.


A Melbourne ice haul of 135kg packed into suitcases has been uncovered after authorities tracked profits of a crime syndicate.

Authorities tracking money linked to offshore crime syndicates have seized $130 million worth of ice packed into plastic bags and stacked in four bulging suitcases in a Melbourne apartment.

Four Taiwanese nationals in Australia on tourist visas have been charged over the crystal methylamphetamine haul.

More than 135kg of the drug was seized, an amount which police say would have been on-sold to users 1.3 million times over.

A joint Australian Federal Police and Australian Crime Commission (ACC) operation netted the illicit product, after intelligence was provided through the Eligo national task force which tracks money laundering.

ACC national manager of investigations Richard Grant said people were increasingly being targeted by cartels and offshore syndicates, focused purely on profit.

“One of the things for the Eligo task force is going after the profits and this is how we were able to track these particular syndicate members to end up with these seizures,” he told reporters on Wednesday.

AFP commander Bruce Giles said the bust was significant and investigations into the exact source of the drugs were ongoing.

“Traditionally with this quantity of ice, you would expect it to come by land or sea,” he said.

The drugs were found in four suitcases in an inner-city Melbourne apartment on Tuesday afternoon.

Four men have been charged with a range of drug offences.

A brief hearing in the Melbourne Magistrates Court on Wednesday was told the men were in Australia on tourist visas and have no fixed address within the country.

Shu Yi Lin, 20, and Li Ping Chen, 23, were both charged with possessing a commercial quantity of ice suspected of being illegally imported.

Chun Lan, 28, and Ming Hsuan Ou, 23, were each charged with trafficking a commercial quantity of ice.

Update-convicted and jailed-Ex-cop David Branov pleads not guilty to more than 50 charges


Former police officer David Branov.

Former police officer David Branov.

AN alleged rogue cop linked to outlaw motorcycle gangs gave up the drug ice only to get a job with Victoria Police, a court has heard.

David Branov, 42, of Mill Park, was yesterday refused bail after allegedly committing serious offences while free on bail.

Melbourne Magistrates’ Court heard the former senior constable gave up ice to secure a position in the force. He began using it again within two years on the job and remained an addict, the court heard.

Mr Branov, who is no longer on the force, has pleaded not guilty to more than 50 charges, including dozens of offences allegedly committed while on bail.

The court heard the suspended officer was arrested on April 29 after he was discovered being driven about in a stolen BMW while in possession of lock-picking equipment.

A search of his house turned up a swag of stolen documents, including drivers’ licences and a passport, the court heard.

Imitation guns, swords, nunchucks, hunting knives and a balaclava were also seized by detectives.

David Branov at a previous court appearance.

David Branov at a previous court appearance.

The new charges include theft, handling stolen goods, possessing the proceeds of crime, weapons offences, possessing counterfeit money, possessing housebreaking implements, going equipped to steal, and committing an indictable offence while on bail.

The court heard police believed he was an unacceptable risk of reoffending if released again.

Mr Branov was first charged just over a year ago when police alleged he stole more than $5000 worth of the drug ice from the Fitzroy police station and sold it.

He is also accused of selling sensitive information to criminals for $600 a month.

Magistrate Jelena Popovic was critical of Mr Branov for failing to comply with his bail conditions and said the community expected better from a serving police officer.

She also expressed concern at Victoria Police accepting him into the police force considering the revelations of his drug abuse at the time.

“I’m concerned you were accepted at all,” she said.

Mr Branov will return to court in July.

Monday, May 12, 2014

David Branov, a very bent copper

David Branov, a very bent copper

Former senior constable David James Branov, 42, of Epping, was arrested in April last year and charged with offences including perverting the course of justice, misconduct and drugs and weapons offences.

He was released on bail but was arrested again in April this year when he was a passenger in a stolen BMW containing stolen property which was pulled over by police.

A search of his house turned up stolen identification documents, lock-picking tools, Victoria Police badges, samurai swords and imitation firearms, the Melbourne Magistrates Court heard.

Branov on Monday pleaded not guilty to all charges against him, including one count of possessing child pornography.

Informant Detective Sergeant Jarrod Weddle told the court Branov told him he had a drug addiction he overcame to join the police force, but started using again because of the “stress of the job”.

“He told me he’d been a ice addict prior to joining the police force,” Det Sgt Weddle said.

“I think he needs to commit offences to support his drug habit.”

Branov is also alleged to have stolen drugs from the Fitzroy police station property office under the pretence of doing “spot tests”.

“While the bag was open the drugs would be removed and substituted with another substance,” Det Sgt Weddle said.

Branov is also accused of conspiring with Dean Murphy, 38, of Seddon, and Jamie McNally, 34, of Tarneit, to prevent a brief of evidence being used in court against McNally.

Det Sgt Weddle told the court detectives found a printout of police documents at a Dromana property in April last year.

The detectives were told “the occupant was paying a police officer $600 a month in exchange for information”, Det Sgt Weddle said.

Branov resigned from Victoria Police in November 2013.

Magistrate Jelena Popovic denied Branov bail and said she was severely concerned about items found in his possession including the weapons, lock-picking tools and identification papers.

“I have some concerns about the fact you were admitted to the police force,” she said.

Branov will appear in the Victorian County Court on Tuesday.

Fitzroy police under corruption probe, court told

May 12, 2014

Court reporter for The Age

Police officers suspended from duties at an inner-Melbourne station during a corruption probe are in the process of being disciplined by force command, a court has heard.

Officers based at Fitzroy police station had been suspended over the past year and were now being disciplined, Melbourne Magistrates Court heard of Monday. yeah “disciplined, that’s it…might sign up myself…bloody hell

Victoria Police last year suspended eight officers – six of them from the Fitzroy station – after thousands of pages of confidential police documents were found at three properties, which prompted an investigation into links between police and outlaw motorcycle gangs.

One of the officers at the Fitzroy station arrested in the probe was David Branov, who is accused of leaking information from the police Law Enforcement Assistance Program database to help an associate’s alleged drug trafficking enterprise.

Detective Sergeant Jarrod Weddle, from Victoria Police’s professional standards division, said investigators believed Mr Branov provided co-accused Dean Murphy with information the latter could use to chase drug debts, and conducted surveillance with him.

Detective Sergeant Weddle said Mr Branov had admitted stealing drugs from the property office at Fitzroy police station between 2010 and 2013, and that he had been an ice addict before and during his time as a police officer.

He rose to the rank of senior constable but resigned late last year, the court heard.

Mr Branov is also accused of thwarting a police investigation into Mr Murphy’s alleged drug trafficking and preventing a brief of evidence against another co-accused, Jamie McNally, going to court.

Mr Branov, 42, of Epping, on Monday pleaded not guilty to more than 50 charges including perverting the course of justice, theft, dealing with the proceeds of crime and possessing counterfeit money, child pornography, firearms and drugs.

Detective Sergeant Weddle did not outline how many of the suspended police officers had been disciplined. But he said several officers were suspected of being involved in criminal activity.

The court heard Mr Branov was arrested in April last year after police found confidential police files at a Dromana property.

Investigators were told the man who occupied the property paid a police officer $600 a month in exchange for the information.

Mr Branov was on bail over the corruption-related charges but was remanded in custody last month when a search warrant of his home found documents and goods that had been allegedly stolen from homes and cars.

He was arrested on April 29 when police intercepted a stolen BMW with him and two other men inside, the court heard.

Mr Branov was denied bail on Monday and remanded to appear before the County Court on Tuesday.

Deputy chief magistrate Jelena Popovic said the accused ought to appear before the Supreme Court given the seriousness of the allegations, which were “akin to the very, very large trafficking (cases) and murders”.

But Ms Popovic said it was practical for Mr Branov to appear in the same jurisdiction as Mr Murphy and Mr McNally, should their cases proceed beyond the committal stage.

Mr Murphy, 38, of Seddon, and Mr McNally, 34, of Tarneit are also charged with perverting the course of justice. Mr Murphy also faces charges of possessing drugs and weapons and Mr Branov to disclose information.

Mr Murphy and Mr McNally are due to return to court on May 27 after both had their cases adjourned so they could find legal representation.
Ms Popovic chastised both men for wasting the court’s time and police resources by not having lawyers with them in court. Both men are on bail.
A woman who is an associate of Mr Murphy’s on Monday pleaded guilty to drug trafficking and possessing a firearm. She was bailed to appear before the County Court in August.

Gerard Baden-Clay Committal Hearing Thread Part IV


Kholo Creek Bridge

PLEASE REST IN PEACE ALLISON, WE ARE WITH YOU, WE MISS YOU.

Summary of first 3 days of committal hearing (courtesy of The Courier Mail)

Witnesses testify at committal hearing of Gerard Baden-Clay, charged with murdering wife Allison

Day two: committal hearing of Gerard Baden-Clay over death of wife Allison

Day three: committal hearing of Gerard Baden-Clay over death of wife Allison

____________________________________

Witness Statements/Reports (courtesy of a fellow kind poster who has very generously allowed them to be available to all)

Phillip Geoffrey Broom – former business partner

Jocelyn Anne Frost – former business partner

Associate Professor David Wells – Head, Clinical Forensic Medicine – Victorian Institute of Forensic Medicine

Constable Kieron Ash – first responder

Neil Cameron Robertson – Investigative Computer Analyst – in his element analysing the 100 phones and 50 computers/iPads

Senior Sergeant Narelle Elizabeth Curtis – second responder

Record of Interview – Transcript

000 Call – Transcript

Forensic Procedure Order

Hydrology Report

Autopsy Report

____________________________________

Previous Committal Hearing Post

Gerard Baden-Clay Committal Hearing – 11 March 2013

____________________________________

Baden-Clay’s Sister Speaks (courtesy of 7 News)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rwVR76UPaDQ]

Update 20/03/13 Newly Released images taken the day Gerard Baden Clay reported his wife missing

Gerard Baden-Clay Committal Hearing Thread Part III


Car Positioning

Car Positioning

BC CarportBC Driveway

Summary of first 3 days of committal hearing (courtesy of The Courier Mail)

Witnesses testify at committal hearing of Gerard Baden-Clay, charged with murdering wife Allison

Day two: committal hearing of Gerard Baden-Clay over death of wife Allison

Day three: committal hearing of Gerard Baden-Clay over death of wife Allison

____________________________________

Witness Statements/Reports (courtesy of a fellow kind poster who has very generously allowed them to be available to all)

Phillip Geoffrey Broom – former business partner

Jocelyn Anne Frost – former business partner

Associate Professor David Wells – Head, Clinical Forensic Medicine – Victorian Institute of Forensic Medicine

Constable Kieron Ash – first responder

Neil Cameron Robertson – Investigative Computer Analyst – in his element analysing the 100 phones and 50 computers/iPads

Senior Sergeant Narelle Elizabeth Curtis – second responder

Record of Interview – Transcript

000 Call – Transcript

Forensic Procedure Order

Hydrology Report

Autopsy Report

____________________________________

Previous Committal Hearing Post

Gerard Baden-Clay Committal Hearing – 11 March 2013

____________________________________

Baden-Clay’s Sister Speaks (courtesy of 7 News)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rwVR76UPaDQ]

Update 20/03/13 Newly Released images taken the day Gerard Baden Clay reported his wife missing

Picture of  injuries police found on Gerard Baden-Clay on the day he reported his wife Allison missing. Image of injuries police found on Gerard Baden-Clay on the day he reported his wife Allison missing. injuries police found on Gerard Baden-Clay on the day he reported his wife Allison missing. COURT-Photograph of injuries police found on Gerard Baden-Clay's chest on the day he reported his wife Allison missing. Photograph of injuries police found on Gerard Baden-Clay's face on the day he reported his wife Allison missingGBC injuries

Gerard Baden-Clay Committal Hearing Thread Part II


The committal hearing of Gerard Baden-Clay has now adjourned after hearing evidence over the past three days and will resume again on Monday, 18 March 2013 for a further 3 days.

Summary of first 3 days of committal hearing (courtesy of The Courier Mail)

Witnesses testify at committal hearing of Gerard Baden-Clay, charged with murdering wife Allison

Day two: committal hearing of Gerard Baden-Clay over death of wife Allison

Day three: committal hearing of Gerard Baden-Clay over death of wife Allison

____________________________________

Witness Statements/Reports (courtesy of a fellow kind poster who has very generously allowed them to be available to all)

Phillip Geoffrey Broom – former business partner

Jocelyn Anne Frost – former business partner

Associate Professor David Wells – Head, Clinical Forensic Medicine – Victorian Institute of Forensic Medicine

Constable Kieron Ash – first responder

Neil Cameron Robertson – Investigative Computer Analyst – in his element analysing the 100 phones and 50 computers/iPads

Senior Sergeant Narelle Elizabeth Curtis – second responder

Record of Interview – Transcript

000 Call – Transcript

Forensic Procedure Order

Hydrology Report

Autopsy Report

____________________________________

Previous Committal Hearing Post

Gerard Baden-Clay Committal Hearing – 11 March 2013

____________________________________

Baden-Clay’s Sister Speaks (courtesy of 7 News)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rwVR76UPaDQ]

Update 20/03/13 Newly Released images taken the day Gerard Baden Clay reported his wife missing

Picture of  injuries police found on Gerard Baden-Clay on the day he reported his wife Allison missing. Image of injuries police found on Gerard Baden-Clay on the day he reported his wife Allison missing. injuries police found on Gerard Baden-Clay on the day he reported his wife Allison missing. COURT-Photograph of injuries police found on Gerard Baden-Clay's chest on the day he reported his wife Allison missing. Photograph of injuries police found on Gerard Baden-Clay's face on the day he reported his wife Allison missingGBC injuries

Gerard Baden-Clay Committal Hearing – 18 March 2013


The committal hearing of Gerard Baden-Clay has now adjourned after hearing evidence over the past three days and will resume again on Monday, 18 March 2013 for a further 3 days.

Summary of first 3 days of committal hearing (courtesy of The Courier Mail)

Witnesses testify at committal hearing of Gerard Baden-Clay, charged with murdering wife Allison

Day two: committal hearing of Gerard Baden-Clay over death of wife Allison

Day three: committal hearing of Gerard Baden-Clay over death of wife Allison

____________________________________

Witness Statements/Reports (courtesy of a fellow kind poster who has very generously allowed them to be available to all)

Phillip Geoffrey Broom – former business partner

Jocelyn Anne Frost – former business partner

Associate Professor David Wells – Head, Clinical Forensic Medicine – Victorian Institute of Forensic Medicine

Constable Kieron Ash – first responder

Neil Cameron Robertson – Investigative Computer Analyst – in his element analysing the 100 phones and 50 computers/iPads

Senior Sergeant Narelle Elizabeth Curtis – second responder

Record of Interview – Transcript 

000 Call – Transcript

Forensic Procedure Order

Hydrology Report

Autopsy Report

____________________________________

Previous Committal Hearing Post

Gerard Baden-Clay Committal Hearing – 11 March 2013

____________________________________

Baden-Clay’s Sister Speaks (courtesy of 7 News)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rwVR76UPaDQ]

Update 20/03/13 Newly Released images taken the day Gerard Baden Clay reported his wife missing

Picture of  injuries police found on Gerard Baden-Clay on the day he reported his wife Allison missing. Image of injuries police found on Gerard Baden-Clay on the day he reported his wife Allison missing. injuries police found on Gerard Baden-Clay on the day he reported his wife Allison missing. COURT-Photograph of injuries police found on Gerard Baden-Clay's chest on the day he reported his wife Allison missing. Photograph of injuries police found on Gerard Baden-Clay's face on the day he reported his wife Allison missingGBC injuries

Adrian Bayley Pleads Guilty to Rape – Not Guilty to Murdering Jill Meagher


MAJOR UPDATE 26/03/2015

Jill Meagher killer Adrian Bayley found guilty of three more rapes

Updated 3 minutes ago

One of Australia’s most notorious predators, murderer and serial rapist Adrian Bayley, has been found guilty of three more brutal rapes of young women in Melbourne in the years before he murdered Jill Meagher.

Bayley, 43, raped and murdered the 29-year-old ABC staffer as she walked home from a night out in Brunswick in Melbourne’s north in September 2012, in a crime that shocked the nation.

Now, it has been proven beyond reasonable doubt that Bayley raped other women, including a young Dutch tourist in 2012, and two young prostitutes – one of them also in 2012 and the other almost 15 years ago.

Bayley pleaded not guilty in all three rape trials before the County Court, forcing the victims to give evidence and re-live their trauma in a series of trials that began last year and ended today.

His defence argued that while they did not dispute that the women had been victims of sexual assault, they had mistaken their attacker for Bayley because he had been so prominent in the media.

Broad suppression orders have prevented publication of any details from the three rape trials.

But with the return of the third guilty verdict the suppressions have been lifted.

Adrian Bayley pleaded not guilty in all three trials

The victim in the first trial, held in July last year, was 18 years old in late 2000, and the court heard was from a good home, but became hooked on heroin when she was 14 and turned briefly to prostitution.

In his closting arguments, Senior Prosecutor Peter Rose QC said Bayley, who worked shiftwork in a nearby bakery at the time, was the woman’s third client and her last.

Horrific details emerged in court of the teenager’s sustained ordeal at the hands of Bayley, after he drove her in his car into a narrow laneway in St Kilda, out of sight of passing traffic.

Raping his victims in his car after parking it in confined spaces to ensure they could not escape would become a critical hallmark of Bayley’s offending.

Mr Rose said that at one point during the assault, another car drove into the laneway, and the teenager banged on the back window and mouthed “help me, please help me”.

But Bayley put his fingers down her throat so she could not breathe and threatened to kill her and the car drove away.

“[Bayley] said ‘you little slut, no-one will miss you’,” Mr Rose told the first jury.

“She was frozen with fear … she had never felt such fear in her life.

“She believed he was taking her somewhere to kill her.”

The prosecutor told the court it would be 11 years before she told authorities what had happened, later telling police “it all added up” when she heard about Ms Meagher’s murder, and saw Bayley’s image.

When she read about Jill Meagher, she immediately identified [Adrian Bayley’s] face.

Senior Prosecutor Peter Rose QC

“When she read about Jill Meagher, she immediately identified his face,” Mr Rose said.

In a chilling twist of the case, the court heard when she was first approached by Bayley, the teenager had just come from a prostitutes’ collective centre where she had been given a pamphlet with warnings of “bad men” who had been harassing local sex workers.

The 18-year-old was reading the pamphlet when she got into Bayley’s car and told him she could not believe “how many bad people are out there”.

Bayley told her he was “one of those bad guys”, Mr Rose said.

Two more rapes just months before Jill Meagher attack

The victim in the second rape trial was another street prostitute attacked by Bayley several months before the fatal attack on Ms Meagher.

The court heard she was 25 years old when Bayley picked her up in his car and drove it into a narrow, dead-end laneway in Elwood in April 2012.

Bayley told his victim that it was stupid she did not have a pimp or a “spotter” looking out for her, the prosecutor said.

Key points

  • Adrian Bayley was brought to three separate trials from July 2014 for three rapes
  • One of the rapes happened in 2000 and two in 2012
  • He was found guilty in all three trials, after pleading not guilty
  • Suppression orders on reporting were lifted upon the conclusion of third case in March 2015
  • Bayley pleaded guilty to killing Jill Meagher in 2012 and was sentenced to life in prison, with a minimum of 35 years
  • He had previously served a total of 11 years in prison for the rape and attempted rape of a total of eight women
  • He was first jailed in 1991 for a minimum of three years for raping two teenagers and attempting to rape another when he was 19
  • He was jailed again in 2001 for a minimum of eight years for raping five prostitutes over six months in 2000
  • In 2012 while on parole, he assaulted a man in Geelong
  • Bayley was on parole when he raped and murdered Ms Meagher and when he raped two other women in preceding months

Mr Rose told the court that when the victim struck out with her legs, cracking the windscreen, Bayley told her that he could “keep her for ages” and no-one would know she was missing.

At one point during the attack, the court heard Bayley wound up the car’s windows to muffle his victim’s screams.

The court heard he was also preoccupied with her identifying him from his tattoos.

Eventually, she convinced him to drive to a nearby hotel to use the bathroom, and when she came out and refused his demand to get back into the car, he drove away.

It was eight months later, three months after Jill Meagher was murdered, that the 25-year-old saw a police photo on a television report about another sex attack in St Kilda and called Crime Stoppers.

The jury in the second trial took less than an hour to return a guilty verdict.

In the third trial, the victim gave evidence via video-link from the Netherlands.

The prosecutor told the court that the Dutch tourist was walking home alone from the popular Elephant and Wheelbarrow pub in St Kilda in July 2012 on the night she was attacked.

She had been walking for half an hour from the beach precinct and was almost at St Kilda Road near her Balaclava share house, when she noticed two cars parked by the side of the road.

Mr Rose said the 27-year-old was “a little drunk” and when the driver of one of the cars beckoned her over to tell her he had seen a car following her and offered to drive her home, she got in.

He covered her mouth to stop her yelling and held her throat. He told her she couldn’t get out and no-one would hear her. She was afraid she was going to be killed.

Senior Prosecutor Peter Rose QC

That man was Bayley, Mr Rose told the court, and instead of taking her home, he drove to a small dark parking space near some apartments and “stopped between two fences”.

“She asked to get out … he said no,” Mr Rose told the jury.

“He said, ‘you can’t get out so you may as well have sex with me’.

“He then hit her to the side of the face … he covered her mouth to stop her yelling and held her throat. He told her she couldn’t get out and no-one would hear her.

“She was afraid she was going to be killed.”

Mr Rose said the young woman capitulated in fear for her life and encouraged Bayley to come back to her house, in the hope of escaping.

When he agreed and drove her home, she ran inside screaming and locked herself in the bathroom.

She told her housemates she thought she was going to die … she was crying hysterically.

Senior Prosecutor Peter Rose QC

The court heard Bayley took several steps inside the share house but fled when he realised other people were home.

The woman’s housemates called triple-0.

“She told her housemates she thought she was going to die … she was crying hysterically,” Mr Rose said.

Two months later, Bayley attacked Jill Meagher.

He was arrested five days later at his Coburg home, and led detectives to a shallow grave on a quiet road on Melbourne’s outer north-western fringe.

Bayley’s phone records, obtained during the investigation of Ms Meagher’s murder, showed that he was in St Kilda on the night of the backpacker’s rape.

Defence argued false identification of Adrian Bayley

The media blackout extended across all three County Court trials and jurors in all three of them were told nothing of the other cases pending against Bayley.

But such is Bayley’s notoriety in light of Ms Meagher’s rape and death, the court and lawyers took the extraordinary step of telling the pool of potential jurors at each trial exactly who he was in relation to that crime, right from the beginning.

“That is Adrian Bayley,” said defence lawyer Saul Holt, pointing across the courtroom during his opening statement in the third trial, just concluded.

That is Adrian Bayley … You know who he is.

Defence lawyer Saul Holt tells jurors as he points across the court

“You know who he is.”

Mr Holt said even if jurors had not been told of Bayley’s background, “you would probably have found out on your own anyway”.

“Please remember when you were empanelled, you were confident you could be impartial,” he told the jury.

“You took an oath to try this case only on the evidence. Please don’t fill in the gaps … distasteful as [the Jill Meagher case] is.”

Judge Sue Pullen also cautioned the jurors.

“It’s absolutely essential you put it out of your minds completely,” Judge Pullen said.

“It is essential not to look on the internet … or to investigate the background of Mr Bayley.

“We all have biases, we all have prejudices. I don’t expect everyone to lose them overnight but … you have to make a decision coldly, clinically.”

In all three trials, Mr Holt told jurors the defence did not dispute the victims were brutally raped, and that “something awful” happened to them.

But he told the juries, the victims had it wrong.

“In September 2012 he was arrested for the rape and murder of Jill Meagher and his details were everywhere … she [the victim] has identified things that she says were from him and that she’s got elsewhere,” Mr Holt said in the second trial of Bayley.

“Use your head, not your heart. Suspend your disbelief about the fact that I would defend him after all that you know about him.

“She [the victim] has jumped on the Adrian Bayley bandwagon.”

In returning three guilty findings, the jurors ultimately disagreed.

One of Victoria’s most violent criminals

The convictions add to a virtually unsurpassed record of violent sexual offending from a man in and out of prison and on the radar of authorities over many years, who was on parole when he attacked some of his victims, including Ms Meagher.

That last fatal attack on Ms Meagher horrified the community, leading to an enormous outpouring of grief and anger, with mainstream and social media coverage of a volume never seen before.

The extent of Bayley’s offending was last revealed when he was sentenced by Supreme Court Justice Geoffrey Nettle in June 2013 to life in prison, with a non-parole period of 35 years for the rape and murder of Ms Meagher.

“As your criminal record reveals, you are a recidivist violent sexual offender … in terms of moral culpability your killing of the deceased ranks among the worst kinds conceivable,” Justice Nettle told Bayley.

At the time, it emerged Bayley had been targeting, threatening and raping women his entire adult life.

His victims included his 16-year-old sister’s friend 25 years ago, a teenage hitchhiker and a series of St Kilda street workers in 16 rapes a decade later.

It was those crimes Bayley spent eight years in prison before his release on parole in 2010.

Adrian Bayley admitted raping and strangling Jill Meagher in a Melbourne laneway, but has pleaded not guilty to her murder.  The 41 year old will stand trial in the Victorian Supreme Court after the Deputy Chief Magistrate found there was enough evidence for a jury to convict him.  Bayley pleaded guilty to one count of rape in the Melbourne Magistrates Court yesterday and not guilty to murder and another two charges of rape.

UPDATE 5TH MAY 2013

Adrian Bayley arriving at court 5th May 2013

Adrian Bayley arriving at court 5th May 2013

ADRIAN Bayley has arrived at the Supreme Court for a hearing over the death of Melbourne woman Jill Meagher, where he is expected to plead guilty to charges of murder. More to come…

Bayley, 41, pleaded guilty in the Melbourne Magistrates’ Court on March 12 to one count of raping Ms Meagher.

He pleaded not guilty to her murder and two of three counts of rape.

Bayley was set to stand trial over the murder in a Brunswick laneway in September – a year after the crime that shocked the nation.

Last moments of Jill Meagher’s life

  • by: Paul Anderson – From: Herald Sun
  • March 13, 2013 8:59AM

THE man accused of murdering Jill Meagher ran out of petrol after burying the Irish-born ABC employee in a shallow grave, according to court documents.

A police summary of the case against Adrian Bayley, tendered in court, was released to the media after Bayley’s committal hearing yesterday.According to the summary, on the night of September 21 last year, while Ms Meagher was out celebrating with friends in Brunswick, Bayley was arguing with his girlfriend at Swanston St’s Lounge Bar.

The pipeline layer, 41, was arguing with her about “jealousy and possessiveness”. His girlfriend left and returned to their home in Coburg.

“The accused (Bayley) attempted to contact his girlfriend by phone; however, she refused to answer or return text messages and phone calls,” the summary stated.

Bayley left the Lounge Bar at 12.25am and caught a taxi home. There, he changed into a blue hoodie jumper, the summary said.It was about 1am when Ms Meagher, 29, left the Brunswick Green Hotel with a friend and walked to the Etiquette Bar.

Her friend left soon after, twice offering Ms Meagher a ride in a taxi. But she declined, deciding to walk the short distance home.

On her way, outside Chemist Warehouse, she asked a group of three people for a cigarette and had a “short friendly conversation” with the trio.

She then continued on her way along Sydney Rd, towards Hope St. Bayley was in the area by that stage, and saw Ms Meagher walking alone.

“(Bayley) has run up from behind Ms Meagher before slowing to a walk as he approached her.” The Police summary said

Bayley would later tell police: “I was just walking ahead of her and we’d already interacted on Sydney Rd and that’s when she rang her brother. She was actually telling me about her father.”

Ms Meagher called her brother, Michael McKeon, at 1.35am to talk about their sick father.
Mr McKeon said he would call her back in a minute or two. He would try, but his sister’s phone would ring out several times.

Ms Meagher’s husband, Tom, knew his wife was out for drinks with workmates.

At 1.37am, he sent her a text message from their home: “Are you okay?”

The Chief Crown prosecutor, Gavin Silbert, SC, told the court it was 1.38am when Bayley “accosted” Ms Meagher and “proceeded to drag her into a laneway on Hope St between Oven St and Sydney Rd, where he has raped and strangled her”.A bin and parked car in a laneway off Hope St, Brunswick, where Jill Meagher's handbag was found

Bayley later told detectives: “I actually apologised. I can’t imagine how she felt but I know how I felt. All I thought was, ‘What have I done?’ ”

Mr Silbert told the court: “(Bayley) has left the body of the deceased in the laneway and returned to his home address, where he has collected a shovel and his white Holden Astra.”

At 1.47am, an extremely worried Tom Meagher sent his wife another text.

“Answer me, I’m really worried,” it read.

He sent another at 2.07am: “Please pick up.”

The court heard Bayley returned to the laneway at 4.22am and put Ms Meagher’s body into the boot of the car.

He drove to Blackhill Rd, Gisborne South, where he buried Ms Meagher by the side of the road.

“I cried, man, and I dug a hole . . . I didn’t cry for me,” Bayley told detectives.

Tom Meagher, meanwhile, had searched the Brunswick streets in vain.

Adrian Bayley as he was taken into custody in the back of a police car. Picture: Stephen Harman

“I kept trying to ring her but there was no answer,” he said in his police statement.

Bayley was driving home from Gisborne when his car ran out of petrol near the Calder Highway.

He managed to wave down motorist Dayle Watkins, who drove him to a nearby service station.

There, about 6am, he filled a jerry can with petrol.

Mr Watkins then drove Bayley back to his vehicle.

On September 27, after investigating the crime scene and gathering evidence, including CCTV footage and phone records, homicide detectives arrested Bayley.

“After investigators informed (Bayley) of the evidence implicating him, he made admissions,” the police summary stated.

“(Bayley) stated that it was due to the argument that he had had earlier in the night with his girlfriend, that (Bayley) had an angry and aggressive demeanour which he transferred onto the deceased.”

Yesterday, Bayley pleaded not guilty to one count of murder and two counts of rape.

He pleaded guilty to one charge of rape.

EDITED RECORD OF INTERVIEW WITH ADRIAN ERNEST BAYLEY TENDERED TO COURT 

Adrian Ernest Bayley

BAYLEY: You know what? I hope I never get out, because you know why I hope that, because then no one else ever has to be hurt because someone hurts me. I don’t deal with – with hurt very well. You know it wasn’t really my intention to hurt her, you know that? When we conversed, I swear to you man – I swear to I’d – I’d just – I spoke to her and she looked – she looked distraught. Does that make sense?

DETECTIVE:Yeah it does.

BAYLEY:She didn’t look happy.

DETECTIVE:Yeah it does.

BAYLEY:And I spoke to – I spoke to hear, you now and said, look, I’ll just – I’ll – I’ll help you, you know. That’s what I said to her and she was like fu… anyway it doesn’t matter. She flipped me off and that made me angry, because I was trying to do a nice thing. You know that?

DETECTIVE: Yeah yeah.

BAYLEY: She looked distraught.

BAYLEY:She looked distraught, you know. She looked like she was lost … always try to do the right thing some – you know, most of the time and I didn’t take well to her response, you know. I just don’t wanna go through it in detail. That – I can’t.

DETECTIVE: What happened to Jill?

BAYLEY:They should have the death penalty for people like me.

DETECTIVE:I can’t tell you what’s gonna happen.

BAYLEY:No well – that’s what I hope.

DETECTIVE:So you said she fobbed you off and you got angry. Tell me what happened then?

BAYLEY:Oh I just got pissed off and I actually walked off and she followed. I actually walked in front of her and she followed.

DETECTIVE:Yep.

BAYLEY:And it just got worse.

DETECTIVE:Tell me what happened.

BAYLEY:(Starts to cry) … like a big sissy man.

BAYLEY:I wanna do the right thing. It’s not fair on any of this to – it’s not fair of any of this stuff to have happened, let alone her family and stuff too.

DETECTIVE: Yeah.

BAYLEY:Not knowing.

DETECTIVE:Would you be willing to come with me and show me?

BAYLEY:I’ll try. I’ll do my best man.

DETECTIVE:I appreciate that.

BAYLEY:I’m not sure how to get there.

BAYLEY:I know what I’m saying to you. It’s not fair for this to have happened, and it’s not fair on her family and its not fair on them not knowing. It’s not fair.

DETECTIVE:Um. I understand why you don’t want to go into the detail. I understand that totally. Um how – how did she die?

BAYLEY: (Starts to cry). I strangled her.

DETECTIVE:Sorry?

BAYLEY: (Continues to cry). What have I done? What have I done man?

DETECTIVE:And where did that happen?

BAYLEY:On Hope Street.

DETECTIVE:How did she come to get in the laneway?

BAYLEY:we – we walked past it.

DETECTIVE:yeah

BAYLEY:That far down Hope St. I didn’t take her from the street, or – you know?

DETECTIVE: Yeah and then?

BAYLEY:And we were just talking you know? We weren’t – there was no argument, there was no – it was just talking. And then um …

DETECTIVE:Alright.

BAYLEY:I was just walking ahead of her and we’d already interacted on Sydney Rd, and that’s when she rang her brother. She was actually telling me about her father.

DETECTIVE:Right

BAYLEY:You know? And I was just – I was trying to be nice and – she kept going from being nice to nasty, to nice, to – you know what I mean?

DETECTIVE:Yep.

BAYLEY:And it just sort of ended up in the alley. I cant remember yeah, you know what I mean, 100 per cent, like how it ended up. We were just sort of – we were standing there.

DETECTIVE: Um how did you – how did you strangle her?

BAYLEY:With my hands.

DETECTIVE:With your hands. And once that had happened, what did you do?

(interview interrupted by knock at door, then resumes)

BAYLEY:I didn’t run.

DETECTIVE:You didn’t run?

BAYLEY:(starts to cry) That’s not it man. I actually apologised.

DETECTIVE:To her?

BAYLEY:But I didn’t run. I didn’t – didn’t know what to do. It’s a horrible feeling man.

DETECTIVE: Yeah.

BAYLEY:I can’t imagine how – how she felt, but I know how I felt. It’s not nice man, its not nice. And all I thought was what have I done? That’s all I thought. That was the thought in my head, what have I done after I said sorry. I didn’t know what else to say, man. I don’t know what else to say.

DETECTIVE:And what happened to her belongings?

BAYLEY:The phone I smashed. Just the other stuff I threw.

DETECTIVE:You walk to the side, you get the shovel. Tell me what you do.

BAYLEY:I cried man, and I dug a hole.

DETECTIVE:Yeah

BAYLEY: I cried man, And I didn’t cry for me, you need to understand that. I didn’t cry for me, just like I’m not crying for me now.

Jill Meagher

TIMELINE

Saturday September 22, 2012

  • 1.30am: Jill Meagher leaves Bar Etiquette in Sydney Rd, Brunswick, in Melbourne’s inner-north to walk home. CCTV from the Dutchess Boutique captures both Ms Meagher and Adrian Bayley walking past.
  • 1.38am: Mr Bayley allegedly grabs Ms Meagher and drags her into a nearby laneway off Hope St.
  • 1.40am – 1.45am: Neighbours hear a woman yelling from laneway. After a few minutes the yelling stops.
  • 2am: Tom Meagher tries calling his wife’s mobile phone.
  • 4am: Mr Meagher leaves his home in Lux Way – not far from the scene – to go and look for his wife.
  • 4.22am: It is alleged that having gone home to Coburg in Melbourne’s northern suburbs for a shovel, Mr Bayley returns in his white Holden Astra.
  • 4.26am: Car allegedly drives off with Ms Meagher’s body in the boot.
  • 6am: After continuing to call his wife’s phone all night without luck, Mr Meagher reports her missing.

Sunday September 23

  • 12.30pm: A Facebook page is set up in the hope somebody saw Ms Meagher.
  • 3.15pm: Police release public call for information about Ms Meagher’s disappearance.

Monday September 24

  • 6.30am: Ms Meagher’s handbag found in lane off Hope St. Police believe it was planted the day before.
  • 8.50am: Homicide squad takes over the case.
  • 1.45pm: Forensic officers recover evidence from the lane way. Detectives interview Mr Meagher.

Tuesday September 25

  • 12.30pm: Forensic police search the Meagher home and take away their car and bags of items for testing.
  • 3.55pm: Police release footage from the Dutchess Boutique of Ms Meagher and a man in a blue hoodie.
  • 6.15pm: Police return to the Meagher home and search again.

Thursday September 27

  • 2.30pm: Mr Bayley arrested in Coburg.
  • 3.58pm: Police interview with Mr Bayley begins.
  • 10pm: Interview suspended while police travel to a site allegedly nominated by Mr Bayley.

Friday September 28

  • 3am: Mr Bayley remanded at an out-of-sessions hearing after being charged with murder.
  • 4am: Ms Meagher’s body is taken away by coronial staff after being recovered from a shallow grave at the side of Black Hill Rd in Gisborne South, north of Melbourne.

Disappearance and Murder of Sarah Cafferkey


Hi folks, I am not in a position to contribute much with so much on my plate at the moment but I am creating this post so you good people may discuss the sad situation here.

Two more arrested over Sarah Cafferkey’s murder

Wayne Flower, Paul Anderson

November 22, 2012 3:01PM

Memorial for Sarah Cafferkey

Cafferkey accused remanded in custody

Sarah’s mum mourns a life lost

Homicide squad detectives arrested two men today at a home in Tarneit about midday.

A 32-year-old from Tarneit and a 34-year-old from Point Cook are assisting police with their inquiries.

They are being held at the St Kilda Rd police complex.

It comes as community members will hold a candlelight vigil to remember Ms Cafferkey tonight.

Point Cook residents, shocked by the discovery of Ms Cafferkey’s body in a house in the suburb, will attend the vigil at a local park at 7.30pm.

Organiser Alice Osborne said the community wanted to show their respect for Sarah and her family.

“The community is devastated … we are also wanting to show Sarah’s family we are very saddened about what has happened and we care for them and are supporting them,” Ms Osborne said.

Yesterday, the man accused of stabbing Ms Cafferkey to death and dumping her body in a wheelie bin sat silent in court.

Cafferkey accused remanded in custody

The man charged with killing Sarah Cafferkey has been remanded in custody after a brief court appearance.

In an olive polo shirt and with a shag of bleach-blond hair, Steven James Hunter appeared briefly in Melbourne Magistrates’ Court charged with murder.

His lawyer noted the case already had received significant media attention and, while asking that Hunter’s street address be deleted from the charge sheet to be released to the media, he told Magistrate Donna Bakos he hoped the press would “be mindful” that Hunter had now been charged.

Prosecutor Luke Exell said that the police brief of evidence would be served on Hunter’s solicitors by February.

Hunter sat staring into his lap during the procedural filing hearing. With powerful arms, one bearing a visible tattoo, he stood when Ms Bakos addressed him.

She noted he had no custody management issues and had no intention of applying for bail.

Homicide squad investigators arrested Hunter on Tuesday after he was tracked to a flat in Caroline St, Hawthorn.

The special operations group locked down the street before telling Hunter to come out with his hands up.

It took Hunter less than a minute to emerge from the second-storey unit.

An out-of-sessions hearing on Tuesday night heard Hunter fatally stabbed 22-year-old Ms Cafferkey with repeated blows at his Bacchus Marsh address on November 10.

Detective Sen-Constable Damien O’Mahoney told the court Hunter had made admissions about the killing. He will appear in court on March 27.

 

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 2,051 other followers

%d bloggers like this: