Update Martin Place siege: Hostages taken in Lindt Chocolate shop-Ends in tragedy


This is a very serious situation taking place live on TV. All sorts of reporting about who and why they have taken hostages…Lets hope the hostages get out alive- UPDATE Unfortunately that has not been the case. I personally think they needed to react much much earlier and take the asshole out.The dust will settle and all that will be analysed. My thoughts are really with the family and friends of hostages both dead and alive.

There are hundreds and hundreds of bouquets, it’s probably about 15 metres by 15 metres and growing rapidly… the thing that struck me is that these aren’t just random bouquets, people have gone to the effort of writing personal notes to the families and to the victims.

ABC 702 reporter John Donegan

sad update this morning, he also made hostages film this tape yesterday afternoon causing great anguish and stress, as the hostages cannot understand why a few simple demands had still not been met (in their eyes) which would enable their release.Compelling viewing (removed by youtube ATM)

sheikh-haron-october2014_redacted

letter-to-pm-tony-abbott-1nov13_redacted

about-sheikh-haron

Hauntingly I have been able to find his website via the archives online and check out this ominous warning in relation to channel 7 and something they broadcast quite a while ago, in 2011 (Click image to enlarge

Haron promise


 

A good insight, until we get the official reports from the enquiry I will not be posting any more news media…

Sliding door tragedy of the Lindt cafe in Sydney’s Martin Place

 AT 9.44am on Monday, the sliding doors closed at the Lindt cafe. Seventeen hours later, two lives would be lost and an evil sham sheik would have changed our nation forever.

HE orders a skinny flat white.

He is in a hurry, yet there’s time to admire the vaulted ceilings of the former bank chamber.

The four well-dressed ladies around the corner seem so happy. Here’s an old fellow alone at a table. Then, they call his name. “Chris?” Wow. That was quick.

Chris Kenny does not see a middle-aged man with the scruffy beard, a father of four who likes his coffee.

He is sitting at a table, a sawn-off shotgun in a blue bag, chatting with the cafe manager.

Kenny, a senior journalist at The Australian, is walking out the door.

His phone is ringing and his mind is elsewhere. It’s 5AA, a South Australian radio station, for a pre-arranged interview.

Kenny sits at an outside table, a few metres from the automatic doors. He discusses the state Liberal Party’s apparent need for generational change.

As he finishes, three motorcycle police pull up with sirens blaring.

A woman tells officers she has tried to enter through the cafe’s sliding doors. They have been locked shut.

UNIMAGINABLE END FOR A PERFECT LIFE

10 FATEL FAILURES THAT LED TO TRAGEDY

NINE SILENT MINUTES THAT BEG SO MANY QUESTIONS

DUMP HIS BODY AT SEA, MUSLIM LEADERS SAY

BARISTA ELLY CHEN ESCAPED WITH LIFE

Kenny’s interview started at 9.40am. He may have been the last person to walk through the sliding doors of the Lindt Cafe in Martin Place.

He belongs now with David Johnson, the Lindt cafe worker given the day off, and his colleague Bruno, who turns up just before 10am for his shift.

He belongs with us, on the outside, if only just, in the chaos of sirens and roadblocks, where the confusion is captured by a Sydney cabbie blocked in Elizabeth St: “Bastards. Terrorism in Sydney. My god.”

INSIDE the cafe, palms are pressed against glass.

The mood Kenny witnessed has dissolved in the theatrics of a movie scene, starring a villain who delivers bad lines for the next 17 hours.

Eighteen staff and customers have been ordered to put their hands up.

They have been told to lie down. There are screams and sobs. Someone vomits.

The man with the bandana and the shotgun wants to be called “the brother”.

He says he is from the Islamic State. He says he has bombs.

Man Haron Monis is doing what he has done since he arrived in Australia in 1996.

As a proclaimed IS extremist, he is pretending to be something he is not: until recently, before the most unlikely of conversions, he was a Shi’a – not Sunni — Muslim.

He has terrorised before, by words and deeds, though not like this.

He has chosen an unusually nice grouping of people to menace.

John O’Brien, the 82-year-old, is on his annual ritual of a coffee after his eye check-up upstairs. Three lawyers, including Katrina Dawson and her pregnant colleague Julie Taylor are catching up.

Dawson is indulging a daily routine in being here: she had asked along another friend this morning, but she had missed the call.

Among four Westpac people is the Indian father, Viswakanath Ankireddy, who would ring his wife during the crisis and his colleague, Puspendu Ghosh, still abuzz from a recent skydive. Selina Win Pe is with them to discuss IT issues: soon, under threat of a gun, she will be making demands of a prime minister.

The cafe staffers, their fellow prisoners, share a genuine camaraderie that defies many workplaces.

Tori Johnson, 34, is the sort of manager who sticks his tongue out in Christmas Party photos.

He is from a close-knit family: he hopes to one day marry his partner of 14 years, Thomas Zinn.

The staff share qualities with their customers that Monis can not claim.

They laugh in their spare time. They love. They have much to give and stand to be missed.

They belong on the outside. Monis, it subsequently seems, has never belonged.

Monis has a plan.

 Like all his plans it runs short of a logical conclusion. As far as it goes, it succeeds within the first hour or so.

His impact is almost Dystopian. The streets are emptied and barricades rise. Trains are stopped and offices are evacuated.

The Martin Place Christmas tree suddenly soars like a relic from another era.

Elly Chen, normally a smiley 22-year-old, is working only her sixth day at the cafe.

She holds up a black flag with white Arabic text to the window, directly behind the cafe company’s Christmas message.

It is an opening shot in Monis’ message which, like all of Monis’ messages, runs foul of logic.

And there is a lag, almost as if the world is granted time to process events.

For hours, no one is saying what is going on. Monis wants to speak to Prime Minister Tony Abbott. He wants his siege to be announced as an attack by ISIS.

He orders an ISIS flag delivered. He has hostages deliver these messages to news outlets from about noon.

It’s still unclear how soon dialogue is established with police negotiators.

John O’Brien was one of the first to escape. Picture: Toby Zerna

John O’Brien was one of the first to escape. Picture: Toby Zerna Source: News Corp Australia

O’BRIEN has a headache when he spots his chance.

It’s maybe five hours since he would have left of his own accord, perhaps for a hit of his beloved tennis.

He, along with lawyer Stefan Balafoutis, has been allowed to go to the toilet.

They spot a green button at the bottom of a glass door and wonder if the button will open the door. They discover it does.

The cameras track their first uncertain steps on the street, driven by an overwhelming mix of relief and adrenaline, while TV commentators fumble for the right verb — release or escape?

Chen’s expression captures the same anguish and fear when she spills into the street soon afterwards.

She has followed colleague Paolo Vassallo, and precedes Bae Jie-Un.

Monis is enraged by the escapes. He speaks of “an eye for an eye”. None of his demands have been met.

What would have followed had they been — he promised limited releases of hostages for each — is unclear.

Jarrod Hoffman is one of several hostages ordered to spread Monis’ gospel.

It is probably Hoffman, a 19-year-old student, who rings 2GB’s Ray Hadley.

Hadley reports hearing a Middle-Eastern Australian voice giving instructions in the background.

More calls are later made to the Daily Telegraph and TV stations.

Hoffman explains that he is on speaker and that he has a gun pointed to his head. “If someone else runs, someone dies,” Hoffman explains.

Later in the day, Monis orders hostages to record video messages for media organisations.

They are sinister viewing. The hostages speak of “we”, as if they are willing.

Some look more nervous than others. Taylor is businesslike: “We are here with … ummm our brother, who has asked for three simple things, and the first is that Tony Abbott calls him, live in the media, to have a short conversation. . . we can’t understand why that hasn’t happened.”

Mother-of-three Marcia Mikhael has been pressed into Facebook postings by early afternoon. Her formalness is unusual in the social media age, but then again, her words read like a poor joke.

Like Taylor, she is a very successful person, a Westpac executive and fitness business owner. Yet no one inside the cafe can argue against Monis, a nobody in the outside world.

Onlookers feel surges of futility.

Yet only the hostages burn with the violation of being manipulated as pawns. Only they can properly express the growing fear reflected in increasingly tense messages.

“Dear friends and family…” Mikhael’s Facebook message reads.

“The man who is keeping us hostage has asked for small and simple requests and none have been met. He is now threatening to start killing us.”

Such communications are unprecedented, at least in Australia.

They are a product of a new age of technology and terror. Media outlets mostly heed police bans and do not publish or broadcast Monis’ messages.

Yet Monis grabs some underground traction. He resorts to YouTube and these video messages are said to spread.

The hostages’ families, meanwhile, are fretting.

“Please do not share or spread any messages released by the hostages as the terrorist is using them as a means of communication,” writes Mikhael’s niece. “This could put my aunty and the others in grave danger.”

Another hostage, Fiona Ma, uses Facebook as a source of hope. She has been posting and reading messages throughout the day, prompting this latter message: “I’m getting your messages everyone! Thank-you you beautiful souls…Guys I love each and everyone of you.”

OVER 17 hours, Monis does not get what he wants.

Instead, he muddles and confounds.

In doing so, like in his past, he inspires others to rise above his “antics” — as one acquaintance puts it — and seek to overcome the hurt he inflicts.

The hostages have a world’s prayers. It isn’t enough, not on this battleground, not even with hundreds of heavily armed cops just metres away. Monis has an unfair advantage. He has unpredictability — and his gun.

His skittishness grows later in the day. He paces and herds the hostages from one end to the other — this followed rotations when hostages held their hands on the windows.

He shouts and uses Louisa Hope, an MS sufferer with a walking stick as a “shield”. Later, Monis still grips her as he started to tire, despite the protests of her 68-year-old mother, Robyn.

The refusals of her and O’Brien to yield to an armed crazy man’s wishes sound like the makings of folklore.

O’Brien has refused to hold Monis’ flag or lie on the floor for him. Monis, according to a report in The Australian, leaves him alone after this.

It is many hours after O’Brien has gone.

Australia has gone to sleep, knowing the police will wait it out. It is about 2am, and fear and exhaustion are major factors.

The next 15 minutes stand to be forensically analysed in months ahead. For now, we must rely on witness accounts and unofficial sources.

We know that a plot has been hatched after Monis says “it will be in the morning”.

Comic book fan Joel Herat, 21, is a ringleader. A group of hostages figure that death will follow inaction.

A single shot rings out at 2.04am. It is said that the bullet slams into a door or the ceiling. Is it a warning shot aimed at dissuading those hostages who soon appear, arms raised, in the street? Herat shepherds a pregnant 30-year-old Taylor before making his own exit.

The hostages have smashed a side-door lock to escape. Ankireddy’s father sees his son’s escape on Indian TV.

Hostages were forced to hold up an Islamic flag at Lindt cafe in Sydney’s Martin Place.

Hostages were forced to hold up an Islamic flag at Lindt cafe in Sydney’s Martin Place. Source: Supplied

The cafe is darkened. It’s said that Johnson now tackles Monis and tries to grab his gun. It makes sense that Johnson would try to free his fellow hostages.

Such an act sounds true to his nature.

One newspaper report says that Johnson is beaten around the head before being killed with a head shot by Monis’ gun.

This may be the 2.13am shot that is played again and again the next day, the shot that leads a technical support sniper, perched at a Channel 7 window opposite, to say into his microphone: “Hostage down. Window two.”

What follows is officially known as the “emergency action plan”. Police in night goggles break in, setting off what looks and sounds like an indoor fireworks display. Stun grenades echo. Dozens of rounds are fired.

The outburst is timed at 34 seconds. When it ends an alarm rings and there is screaming. Monis is dead.

His shield Louisa Hope is shot in the foot, her mother Robyn in the shoulder.

Katrina Dawson is fatally wounded. Her loss, like Johnson’s, is inexplicable, and the floral memorial for their loss will lend itself to easy comparisons with Princess Diana’s death in 1997. It will seem so right that Johnson loved flowers.

It will seem so wrong that Dawson’s children, aged eight, five and three, wake the next morning to the worst news.

According to Channel 7, Monis greets the rush of officers with a lament: “Look what you’ve made me do.”

AS epitaphs go, Monis’ final words sound about right.

They befit a predator long practised in the role of playing the victim. They also raise questions about Monis’ goals. The only obvious thread in his public history, besides its oddness, lies in his drives. His religious and moral principles hold no coherence. His need for attention, however, is a constant. Publicity for Monis has never been a byproduct so much as an outcome.

In upturning his past in the days after his death, the thoughts of one of his previous victims jump out.

Man Haron Monis and Amirah Droudis.

Man Haron Monis and Amirah Droudis. Source: News Limited

Joan Senger once received a letter from Monis. Her son, Craig, an Australian trade official, had been killed in the 2009 Jakarta terror bombing.

Monis’ words had been hurtful and insulting. Speaking in 2013, Mrs Senger appears to have figured out Monis long before he stopped a city with a gun.

“I just don’t think he thinks like normal people think,” she said.

Unpredictable. Unhinged. Paranoid. These terms are used by those who knew Monis best. He was well-known to others as the sick sod who had linked fallen soldiers and bushfire victims to obscure religious scriptures.

He had been seeking sympathy since he first chained himself to a pole at the NSW Parliament House in 2000, when he demanded his family be brought from Iran and introduced himself as “Ayatollah”.

Those who knew him knew he played at roles. He was the “sham sheikh”.

He was the “peace activist”. Yet his performances served to mask the villain within. Monis tended to be scorned rather than feared, even though his history is potted with extreme violence and misogyny

Martin Place gunman caught on CCTV before siege

Update 10.50AM 16/12/14

THE manager of the Lindt cafe who was fatally shot in the Martin Place siege is being praised as a hero, responsible for allowing others trapped in the cafe to escape.

Tori Johnson, 34, was wrestling a gun from hostage-taker Man Haron Monis when he was killed.

Photo

Hero hostage: Cafe manager Tori Johnson was killed attempting to disarm the gunman.

It is understood the cafe manager decided to take action when the hostage-taker begun to doze off after the siege had been ongoing for 17 hours.

He lunged at the gunman’s weapon, enabling others to flee.

The second hostage killed has been identified as Katrina Dawson, 38. The mother-of-three is the sister of well known Sydney lawyer Sandy Dawson.

Katrina Dawson

Katrina Dawson

Ms Dawson was tragically killed trying to defend her pregnant friend, AAP reports.


 

Sydney siege: Two hostages and gunman dead after heavily armed police storm Lindt cafe in Martin Place

Tue 16 Dec 2014, 7:51am

Paramedics remove a person, with bloodstains on the blankets covering the person, on a stretcher after the end of the Sydney siege on December 16, 2014.

Paramedics remove a person, with bloodstains on the blankets covering the person, on a stretcher after the end of the Sydney siege on December 16, 2014.

About 2:10am (AEDT) there was a confrontation between police and self-styled Iranian cleric Man Haron Monis, who had taken 17 people hostage inside the Lindt Chocolate Cafe in Martin Place on Monday morning.

Police said shots were fired and as a result, the 50-year-old gunman was pronounced dead after being taken to hospital.

It is not clear if the two hostages who died, a man aged 34 and a woman aged 38, were shot by the gunman or killed in the crossfire.

Monis, who was granted political asylum in Australia, took staff and customers in the cafe hostage shortly before 10:00am (AEDT) on Monday.

He was on bail for a string of violent offences, including being an accessory to the murder of his ex-wife.

Monis was also facing more than 40 sexual and indecent assault charges and had a conviction for sending offensive letters to families of deceased Australian soldiers.

Prime Minister Tony Abbott issued a statement commending the “courage and professionalism” of the police and other emergency services involved.

“Australians awoke to the news this morning that the siege in Martin Place has ended,” he said.

“Our thoughts and prayers are with the families of the two deceased hostages, the wounded and the other hostages.”

This morning, NSW Premier Mike Baird addressed a media conference and said: “I come before you with the heaviest of hearts. Unbelievably overnight, we have lost some of our own in an attack we never thought we would see here in our city.

“In the past 24 hours, this city has been shaken by a tragedy that none of us could have ever imagined. The values we held dear yesterday we hold dear today. They are the values of freedom, democracy, and harmony.

“These defined us yesterday, they will define us today, they will define us tomorrow. Our first thoughts and prayers this morning are with the innocent victims of this horrendous, vicious attack.”

Following the confrontation, two women were also taken to hospital with non-life threatening injuries, while a male police officer is in a non life-threatening condition after a gunshot wound to his face.

The police operation has concluded and the investigation into the entire incident will be overseen by the Professional Standards Command, a police statement said.

“All information will be provided to the coroner who will determine the cause of, and make any findings about, the events leading to the deaths,” the statement said.

Loud explosions and yelling could be heard from near the cafe at about 2:00am (AEDT) before officers rushed inside.

Just before police stormed the building, at least five hostages came running from the cafe with their hands up and one man lay down on the floor as police patted him down.

Minutes later what appeared to be gunfire and explosions could be heard.

NSW Police Commissioner Andrew Scipione said the situation changed suddenly inside the cafe, allowing more of the hostages to escape.

Police then made the quick decision to put their emergency action plan into place and they moved inside the building.

Thanking all the officers involved in the siege, Commissioner Scipione said: “I want to point out they have saved lives, they have saved many lives.”

He said of the hostages: “I can only imagine the terror that they’ve been through. They are very brave people who in many cases were buying a cup of coffee and they got caught up in this dreadful affair.

“We should reflect on their courage, the courage that they displayed during the many hours in that room.”

He said it was an isolated incident and urged: “Do not let this sort of incident bring about any loss of confidence of working or visiting our city.

“It was the act of an individual. This should never destroy or change the way of our life.”

Soon after police entered the cafe, paramedic crews who had been stationed at the scene throughout the day were seen carrying people out of the building on stretchers, and one patient could be seen being resuscitated.

ABC reporter Siobhan Heanue said there were two volleys of gunfire and loud explosions, in the middle of which screams could be heard.

“The sound ricocheted throughout the tall buildings around the area… and hostages started pouring out of the building,” she said.

“Some running, some able to walk, some with their hands up, and some being carried by ambulance staff.”

An exclusion zone around Martin Place remains, with roads still closed, but the police presence has significantly diminished.

The ABC’s Nick Dole said police were working to secure the scene.

“Exactly what is going on inside we don’t know but we have seen evidence that perhaps police from the bomb squad would be in there,” he said.

“So police are working through the Lindt cafe to at least make it safe for investigators to go through.

“We’ve seen a robot – what looks like a police robot.

“Police are working very hard to make the crime scene safe so the investigation can continue.”

Hostages have been taken to a number of hospitals in the city.

Shortly after Monis locked the hostages inside the cafe, some were seen with their hands up while others were made to hold a black flag with Arabic writing against a window.

Heavily armed police officers took up positions in the pedestrian area, which was cleared for several blocks.

Several hours later, at about 4:00pm, two men ran from a front door of the cafe while a man wearing a Lindt apron came out of a side door.

About an hour later two women who worked at the cafe ran from the building.

Martin Place Cafe Siege: Man Haron Monis named as gunman

Sydney siege gunman identified

THE man who held several people hostage in a Sydney cafe for over 18 hours is a self-styled ‘sheik’ with a long history of run-ins with law enforcement.

Man Haron Monis, 50, is believed to have been killed when police stormed the Lindt cafe in Sydney’s Martin Place in a hail of gunfire shortly after 2am this morning.

Pic of Sheikh "man Monis" Haron charged with writing offensive letters to widows and fami

Sheik Man Monis Haron charged with writing offensive letters to widows and families of fallen Aussie soldiers outside Downing Court today. Source: News Limited

Monis, also known as Sheikh Haron and Mohammad Hassan Manteghi, was on bail on a charge of accessory to murder, relating to the death of his ex-wife, who was allegedly stabbed and set alight in a stairwell of her Sydney apartment complex last year.

LATEST

Monis’s current partner has been charged with murder over the incident.

On granting bail, Magistrate Darryl Pearce saying the Crown’s noted the case against Monis was weak.

In March this year he was charged with more than 50 sexual offences including the 2002 sexual assault of a young woman which was allegedly carried out under the guise of ‘spiritual healing’.

His victim, 27 at the time, allegedly saw an advertisement for ‘spiritual consultation’ in a local newspaper and contacted him.

Man Haron Monis ‘Spiritual healer’ arrested for sexual and indecent assault — SCC Sex Cri

Man Haron Monis ‘Spiritual healer’ arrested for sexual and indecent assault — SCC Sex Crimes Squad Source: Supplied

He told her he was an expert in astrology, numerology, meditation and black magic and advised her to visit his clinic.

Monis arrived in Australia as a refugee from Iran in 1996 and first became known to the public when he was charged with sending offensive letters to the families of Australian soldiers who had died in Iraq and Afghanistan.

In the letters Monis called one Australian Digger ‘the son to a dirty pig, and to a dirty animal’, and urged the Diggers’ families to call on the government to pull troops out of Afghanistan.

In court Monis claimed he was a ‘peace activist’ and that his rights to free speech were being trampled.

Haron Monis was charged for sending hate letters to families of soldiers killed in Afghan

Haron Monis was charged for sending hate letters to families of soldiers killed in Afghanistan. Here, he is pictured appearing for sentencing at the Downing Centre. Source: News Limited

It’s believed Monis lost a High Court appeal against his conviction just last Friday — an event which may have precipitated his decision to stage the Sydney siege.

Shortly before 9.45am yesterday morning Monis entered the Lindt cafe in the heart of Sydney, armed with a sawn-off shotgun and taking up to 20 hostages, several of whom managed to escape yesterday.

Emergency personnel wheel an injured hostage to an ambulance overnight. (AP Photo/Rob Gri

Emergency personnel wheel an injured hostage to an ambulance overnight. (AP Photo/Rob Griffith) Source: AP

After a prolonged period of silence overnight, several hostages desperately fled the cafe before police stormed in shortly later.

Live images of the ensuing firefight were beamed around the world as one loud blast, possibly from Monis’s shotgun, was heard. It was followed by dozens of shots from automatic weapons and flashes from the tactical officers’ flash grenades.

Armed tactical response officers and emergency workers attend the scene (AP Photo/Rob Gri

Armed tactical response officers and emergency workers attend the scene (AP Photo/Rob Griffith) Source: AP

Several ambulances rushed an unknown number of people to hospital as medical teams performed CPR on people in Martin Place. One police officer was seen with blood rushing from his head.

It’s believed three people, including Monis, have died as a result of the firefight.


A man is holding several people hostage at Martin Place cafe

Staff and customers at the Lindt cafe hold what is believed to be a jihadist flag up agai

Staff and customers hold up what is believed to be a jihadist flag up against the window of the Lindt cafe. Source: Channel 7

  • As many as 30 people being held hostage at Lindt cafe
  • Police say at least one gunman involved
  • Incident not being treated as terrorism yet
  • Motivation of gunman unknown – but police have finally spoken directly with him
  • PM Tony Abbott urges calm: “The whole point of politically motivated violence is to scare people.”

HOSTAGES have emerged from the Lindt Cafe in central Sydney where they have been held by a gunman since just before 10am this morning.

Five people have now left the cafe which has been at the centre of a hostage crisis that has paralysed central Sydney and shocked Australia.

Their escape comes after NSW Police Deputy Commissioner Catherine Burn confirmed hostage negotiators were now speaking directly with the gunman.

“Police negotiators have had contact and will continue to have contact,” she said.

Two female Lindt employees ran from the building just before 5pm. Three other hostages, all men, ran from the cafe earlier this afternoon and are now speaking with police.

It was not immediately clear if any of the hostages were released or if they had escaped.

Hostages inside the café have spoken to media outlets. Two hostages have spoken to Sydney radio station 2GB while Ten News is reporting that they have also spoken to two hostages.

One of the hostages runs towards police from Lindt cafe in the central business district

One of the hostages runs towards police from Lindt cafe in the central business district of Sydney. Picture: AFP Source: AFP

A terrified woman runs from the Lindt Cafe

A terrified woman runs from the Lindt Cafe Source: Supplied

A terrified Lindt employee runs to safety

A terrified Lindt employee runs to safety Source: Supplied

Two of the first hostages to get away came out of the front door while the third came out of a fire door. All had their arms raised in the air.

Dramatic television images showed the terrified hostages running free from the buiding and being shielded by heavily armed police.

One was a man in a white shirt and blue jacket, another wore a white shirt, while the third was clearly the Lindt cafe worker dressed in black.

David Faktor, spokesman for St Vincent’s Hospital, told news.com.au that they have received “one male patient and he is in a satisfactory condition”. Mr Faktor would not comment on anything else in relation to the man’s condition but said “he is fine”.

The hospital is on standby for anything else that might eventuate from the siege.

Prime Minister Tony Abbott addressed media tonight and praised police and security services for their work.

“I’ve received messages of support from a number of international leaders and I thank them for their encouragement on this difficult day. It has been a difficult day, it has tested us

He added that “like Australians in all situations, we have risen to the challenge”.

A hostage is seen outside the Lindt Cafe, Martin Place.

A hostage is seen outside the Lindt Cafe, Martin Place. Source: Getty Images

Two hostages run to safety outside the Lindt Cafe.

Two hostages run to safety outside the Lindt Cafe. Source: Getty Images

Dramatic scenes outside the Lindt Cafe as hostages run free after six hours of being held

Dramatic scenes outside the Lindt Cafe as hostages run free after six hours of being held captive. Source: Getty Images

The five hostages escape followed reports that as many as 50 people being held by a gunman at the popular cafe. However, when asked this afternoon about the number of hostages NSW Police Deputy Commissioner Catherine Burn said: “That sort of number does not equate to what we are assuming.”

At least one offender took hostages at the popular Lindt chocolate cafe, in Martin Place, just before 10am.

Some members of staff could be seen wearing their shop aprons and standing with their hands up at the windows. There is also a black and white flag being held up in a window. It is believed to be the Black Standard, a flag that has been hijacked by jihadists and Islamists.

Hostages have reportedly called Channel 9 news late this afternoon – the second time media outlets have been called by those inside the cafe.

It’s believed hostages have been forced to call the television network.

This morning at least two calls were made to 2GB host Ray Hadley. He later spoke to the mother of an 18-year-old apprentice plumber who texted his mother from inside the cafe.

When she asked him how he was he replied: “I’m okay Mum, I can’t talk”. She hasn’t heard anything since then.

Deputy Commissioner Burn said police had spoken with the gunman for the first time since the siege began.

Three hostages escape Lindt cafe siege

Her information was that the remaining hostages hadn’t been harmed.

She said the gunman’s motivations were not known and it wouldn’t be helpful to “speculate”.

The incident has not been branded a terrorist attack yet, but police have confirmed they have “moved to a footing consistent with a terrorism event” in their response.

NSW Police Commissioner Andrew Scipione earlier told reporters it remained a hostage situation “but we are ready to escalate if we need to”.

They did not have “direct contact” with the hostage-taker.

“We’re working through that – at this stage we’ve not got extensive communications … We are not dealing directly with him.”

It was not clear what the offender’s motivation was.

Lindt Australia CEO Steve Loane told news.com.au at the scene this morning he believed there are 40 to 50 people inside the cafe, including customers and staff.

Other reports are suggesting there may only be 13 hostages and police have since said they believe there to be fewer than 30 hostages.

Police handcuffed a man 200m from the cafe siege but a police statement has since clarified the arrest was unrelated to the siege.

Jihadist flag at city centre siege

One of the men believed to be holding people hostage: Courtesy: Channel 7 Source: Channel 7

Jihadist flag at city centre siege

Picture: Courtesy of Channel 7. Source: Channel 7

The National Security Committee of Cabinet has met for briefings on the situation this morning.

At a press conference this morning Prime Minister Tony Abbott said the government did not know whether the hostage situation was politically motivated.

“We don’t yet know the motivation of perpetrator, we don’t know whether it’s politically motivated although there are indications it could be,” he said.

“The whole point of politically motivated violence is to scare people… Australia is a peaceful, open and generous society and nothing should ever change that and that’s why I urge all Australians to today to go about their business as usual.”

Mr Abbott urged all Australians to go about their business as usual but if anyone noticed anything unusual they should call the National Security Hotline 1800 123 400.

He said that the ordinary business of government would go on and the Budget update would be released as planned.

NSW Premier Mike Baird said this afternoon: “We are being tested today in Sydney. The police is being tested, the public is being tested, but whatever the test …we will remain a democractic, civil society.

“There could be some disruption obviously, we are asking also to be patient … we will get through this.”

NSW Police Commissioner Andrew Scipione confirmed an “armed offender” was involved. Police were doing everything in their power to bring the situation to a “peaceful outcome”.

“We have a number of incidents that people believe are connected to the city events

a lot of people concerned when they see police vehicle drive down their street, (that area is involved). This is not the case.”

He said there were a number of officers on standby and was satisfied with the response so far. “It’s as good as you will get anywhere.”

Major landmarks in Sydney, including the Sydney Opera House, have been evacuated as polic
Police are patrolling landmarks around Sydney in response to the Martin Pl hostage siege.

Police are patrolling landmarks around Sydney in response to the Martin Pl hostage siege. Source: Getty Images

In a statement earlier, Mr Abbott said he had also spoken with NSW Premier Mike Baird and “offered him all possible Commonwealth support and assistance”.

“This is obviously a deeply concerning incident but all Australians should be reassured that our law enforcement and security agencies are well trained and equipped and are responding in a thorough and professional manner,” he said.

Mr Baird said his thoughts and prayers were with those affected.

“I’ve spoken to Police Commissioner Andrew Scipione & have full confidence NSW Police are working effectively to resolve the situation,” Mr Baird said.

Opposition Leader Bill Shorten said he had spoken with Mr Abbott this morning and offered him the Opposition’s full support.

“Our thoughts and prayers today are with the innocent people involved … (and) also with their families who are seeing this incredibly distressing situation unfold, along with the rest of Australia.

“Australians can be assured that we are one when it comes to keeping Australians safe.”

Tactical response officers arrive at the scene. Picture: Toby Zerna

Tactical response officers arrive at the scene. Picture: Toby Zerna Source: News Corp Australia

Siege at Martin Place.

Siege at Martin Place. Source: Supplied

Earlier today, Sydney talkback show host Ray Hadley reportedly spoke to one of the hostages inside the cafe off air.

A spokesman for 2GB said Hadly spoke to someone who he believed was a hostage inside the cafe.

The radio presenter called the number more than once and passed the name and details onto the police.

The Sydney Opera House, which was evacuated earlier today, has cancelled tonights performances, while police have urged people to stay away from the central city tonight for their own safety.

International reaction to the crisis has been swift with Canadian PM Stephen Harper tweeting his support and US President Barack Obama being briefed on the situation at the White House.

Lindt Cafe released the following statement on their Facebook page.

“We would like to thank everyone for their thoughts and kind support over the current situation at the Lindt Chocolate Café at Martin Place. We are deeply concerned over this serious incident and our thoughts and prayers are with the staff and customers involved and all their friends and families. The matter is being dealt with by the authorities and we are waiting for any updates from them.”

Also on Facebook were pages supporting the gunman, including one called “Lindt cafe bombers supporters facebook page”. Facebook swiftly removed the page, and urged users to report any offending pages immediately for them to remove.

Police have set up an exclusion zone around the cafe in Martin Place.

BUILDINGS EVACUATED

A Lindt cafe worker who managed to get out of the building told Nine News: “Everyone was sitting down, the door was locked. There was one guy walking around with a hat and a beard.”

Channel 7 reported that a woman told police that she saw a man near the cafe at 9.44am carrying a blue sports bag with what she thought was a gun inside.

The chocolate shop is 30 or 40 metres from the Channel 7 offices so they have cameras trained on the building. Channel 7 was evacuated.

Martin Place is home to several prominent buildings, including NSW Premier Mike Baird’s office, the Reserve Bank of Australia, Westpac Bank and the Commonwealth Bank headquarters as well as the US embassy and the Seven Network. The Supreme Court, Sydney Hospital, State Library of NSW, and NSW parliament were also in lock-down.

The Sydney Opera House was also in lock-down for a short time as authorities enacted a cluster of security measures across the city.

The US Consulate has also been closed.

Seven reporter Chris Reason is currently on the corner of Philip and Hunter St where all five floors of Channel 7 staff were evacuated. He told news.com.au that he is with several hundred people from Seven and surrounding buildings.

He confirmed that police entered Channel 7 at 10am to use their building as a viewing point after the incident first happened at 9.44am.

Sydney siege: Heavily armed police run near Martin Place
Courtesy of Channel 7.

Courtesy of Channel 7. Source: Channel 7

A map of Sydney shows where the Martin Place Lindt Chocolate cafe is located.

A map of Sydney shows where the Martin Place Lindt Chocolate cafe is located. Source: News Corp Australia

At 10.20am the entire building was evacuated and the central hosting duties was transferred to Melbourne to broadcast out of there.

Police have erected a large black shield to cover the corner of the Lindt Store from view.

Mr Reason said: “It’s tense, people are obviously concerned for the people inside. During the initial minutes when the evacuation happened there was, of course, a lot of concern, a lot of anguish from some staff. But nobody resisted, we all followed police orders. Right now, outside the building there is a mix of curiosity and concern and hope that the people inside get out OK.”

Currently there are at least 100 police and tactical units stationed in Martin Place

“I was at a cafe right next to the Lindt Store when I noticed people suddenly running towards the building and looking in. At 9.45 I sort of approached and realised what was happening. At first we thought it was an armed holdup because the RBA (Reserve Bank of Australia) is next door and there were armoured vehicles outside. When we saw the hostages against the windows holding up the flags it was quickly apparent that this was severely urgent.”

When asked whether he thought why the men may have chosen Martin Place, he said: “It’s hard to tell, as we saw in the terror raids in September, Martin Place would be a target. It might not be iconic Sydney location but it is deeply symbolic, on top of our building (Seven) is the State Government, the treasurer the minister, beside it is the financial heart of Sydney with the reserve bank and right in the centre is the cenotaph and ANZAC memorial so it ticks so many boxes when trying to make a political statement.”

There are State Government agencies in the same building and police have shut down traffic in a wide perimeter surrounding the incident. Surrounding buildings are also in lockdown.

RELATED: Martin Place long identified as potential terrorist target

 

There is no confirmation yet whether this is a terrorist attack.

A police statement confirmed that they were dealing with an armed incident and specialist officers were attempting to make contact those inside a cafe.

“Some nearby offices have been evacuated as a precaution. Anyone else in the area encompassing Hunter, George, Elizabeth and Macquarie streets bordering Martin Place is directed to remain indoors and away from open windows. Anyone in the vicinity but outside that area is free to leave their buildings,” the statement said.

“Police urge members of the public to remain calm and note that an appropriate police presence is in place.

Elsewhere in Australia, security has reportedly been increased at the Gabba ahead of the cricket and the Lindt Cafe in Melbourne has been closed with police patrolling the streets outside.

TRANSPORT IMPACTED

The Martin Place train station is shut and trains and buses around the area are being diverted or stopped, including trains between Bondi Junction and Central. Roads are blocked.

A Transport for Sydney spokeswoman told news.com.au that conditions were still changing and they would follow directions from police.

“This is chilling,” said The Morning Show host Kylie Gillies of the scene as she watched on with host Larry Emdur from the Channel 7 news studios. The duo are now off air.

RELATED: Sydney trains cancelled, buses diverted

Frightening siege at Lindt cafe Martin Place Sydney

Frightening siege at Lindt cafe Martin Place Sydney

Sydney siege: Gunman takes hostages in Lindt cafe

Hundreds of armed police have sealed off Martin Place in Sydney’s central business district

Related Stories

At least one gunman has taken several people hostage at a cafe in the Australian city of Sydney.

Pictures on Australian television show at least three people with their hands up against a window, and a black flag with Arabic writing.

Hundreds of armed police have sealed off Martin Place in Sydney’s central business district.

New South Wales police have asked people to avoid the area.

An Australian Broadcasting Corporation reporter said that gunfire had been heard at the scene, the Lindt chocolate cafe – but this has not been confirmed.

No injuries have been reported from the incident, according to a police spokesperson.

At the scene: Wendy Frew, BBC Australia Editor Online

Martin Place is a public pedestrian thoroughfare through the heart of Sydney, joining its parliamentary, legal and retail districts.

It is full of media, members of the public and the police, with what appear to be anxious colleagues of people trapped inside the building, waiting for news. Several surrounding blocks are cordoned off.

Police are at this stage not giving media briefings at the site, there are dozens of police cards have arrived at the scene – with more continuing to come.

Sydney map

Police have also said that they are dealing with an “incident” at the Sydney Opera House which has been evacuated.

Local media are reporting that a suspicious package was found there on Monday, though it was unclear whether it was connected to the Martin Place incident.

Terror threat

Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott has described the Martin Place incident as “deeply concerning”.

“All Australians should be reassured that our law enforcement and security agencies are well trained and equipped and are responding in a thorough and professional manner,” he said in a statement.

A National Security Committee of Cabinet has been convened for Monday morning, the PM’s office said.

Australia has been facing a growing terror threat in recent months, in part connected to the fight against the Islamic State militant group in Syria and Iraq.

In September, the largest anti-terror raids in Australian history were carried out in Sydney and Brisbane after intelligence emerged that people were planning to carry out random attacks on Australian soil.

Only one person was charged with terror offences.

Anti-terror legislation was passed in October, which critics said was too severe.

Mr Abbott has said the threat meant “the delicate balance between freedom and security may have to shift”.

About 70 Australians are believed to be fighting in the Middle East while another 20 have returned home.

Australia recently introduced tough legislation to combat the threat from returned fighters

The Lindt Cafe is located in a plaza in the heart of the city’s financial and shopping district that is usually packed with shoppers at this time of year.

It is home to the state premier’s office and the headquarters of two of the nation’s largest banks.

The state parliament house is also only a few streets away.


 

The Daily Telegraph

  • 12 hostages thought to be held
  • Public transport shut down between Central and Bondi
  • Channel 7 offices evacuated

A hostage has been forced to hold up an Islamic State flag in the window of a shop in Martin Place that is currently under siege.

It is believed there are 12 hostages in the store and an ISIS flag has been placed in the window.

Martin Place is the main financial area of the Sydney CBD.

The scene of a seige at the Lindt Cafe in Sydney's Martin Place.

The scene of a siege at the Lindt Cafe in Sydney’s Martin Place.

The scene of a seige at the Lindt Cafe in Sydney's Martin Place.

The scene of a siege at the Lindt Cafe in Sydney’s Martin Place.

Twitter image of a seige at the Lindt Cafe in Sydney's Maritin Place.

Hostages hold up an IS flag at Lindt Cafe in Sydney’s Martin Place.

Public transport between Central and Bondi Junction has been stopped.

Buses are diverting away from Elizabeth St and Hunter St.

There are various road closures in place and motorists are advised to stay away from the area.

In September Federal Police made a host of arrests after allegedly uncovering a plot to abduct a random Australian and execute them by beheading in a public place, possibly Martin Place and post the act on social media.

Hostage in the Lindt Cafe in Sydney's Maritin Place.

Hostage in the Lindt Cafe in Sydney’s Martin Place.

Lindt Cafe in Sydney's Maritin Place.

Lindt Cafe in Sydney’s Martin Place.

Just before 10am it is believed an attempted robbery was taking place when the offender then took a number of hostages inside the Lindt Chocolate shop.

The area has been cordoned off and police are urging people to stay away.

Police do not know how many hostages are in the shop or what the offender is armed with.

The Lindt shop is usually very busy with four or five staff at this time.

More to come.

Two arrested as robbery strike force inquiries continue – Strike Force Tuft


Two arrested as inquiries continue into spate of armed robberies across Sydney

The Blue Gum Hotel at Waitara was held up on October 20.

The Blue Gum Hotel at Waitara was held up on October 20.

TWO men arrested yesterday are helping police with their inquiries into a spate of armed robberies across Sydney, including one at the Blue Gum Hotel at Waitara.

Detectives from Strike Force Tuft arrested the two men, aged 33 and 30, after a car was stopped at the intersection of Kurrajong Rd and Glossip St at St Marys.

The men are assisting the detectives with inquiries into armed robberies at a hotel in Rooty Hill on Saturday and a licensed premises in St Marys on Sunday.

Inquiries are also continuing into a series of armed robberies at newsagencies, service stations, liquor stores and hotels across Sydney between August 24 and October 21.

During some of the incidents, two men entered the premises armed with a pistol and demanded cash from employees before fleeing the scene.

The Blue Gum Hotel was held up on Monday, October 20 when two men entered the establishment about 3pm and approached a woman in the poker machine room. The men showed her a handgun and demanded cash.

The pair left with a small amount of money and fled via the bottleshop area in Unwin Rd and were last seen turning left into Clarke Rd.

Detectives have renewed their appeals for anyone with information to come forward.

Call Crime Stoppers on 1800 333 000 or use the Crime Stoppers online reporting page: https://nsw.crimestoppers.com.au/


 

Monday, 24 November 2014 08:41:41 PM

Two men are assisting with inquiries into a number of armed robberies across Sydney.

Between Sunday 24 August and Tuesday 21 October 2014, a series of armed robberies was committed upon newsagents, service stations, liquor stores and hotels across Sydney.

During some of the incidents, two men entered the premises armed with a pistol and demanded cash from employees before fleeing the scene.

Officers attached to the Metropolitan Robbery Unit established Strike Force Tuft to investigate the 15 armed robberies and believe they may be linked.

As a result of inquiries by strike force detectives two men, aged 33 and 30, were arrested after a car was stopped at the intersection of Kurrajong Road and Glossop Street a St Marys today (Monday 24 November 2014).

The pair are currently assisting with strike force detectives with inquiries into armed robberies at a hotel in Rooty Hill on 22 November and a licensed premise in St Marys the next day.

Meanwhile, inquiries by strike force detectives into the robberies are continuing.

Further details of the armed robberies include:

a service station at Bankstown on Sunday 24 August 2014,

• a service station at Kellyville on Sunday 24 August 2014,

• a bottle shop at Padstow on Sunday 24 August 2014,

• a newsagency at Smithfield on Thursday 28 August 2014,

• a hotel at Rosehill on Thursday 28 August 2014,

• a club at Eastwood on Saturday 30 August 2014,

• a hotel at Fairfield on Monday 1 September 2014,

• The attempted robbery of a hotel at Allawah on Sunday 7 September 2014,

• a hotel at Ashfield on Sunday 7 September 2014,

• a hotel at Villawood on Thursday 9 September 2014,

• a hotel at Warwick Farm on Monday 13 October 2014,

• a hotel at Merrylands on Wednesday 15 October 2014,

• a hotel at Summer Hill on Saturday 18 October 2014,

• a hotel at Greenfield Park on Monday 20 October 2014,

• a hotel at Waitara on Monday 20 October 2014, and;

• a hotel at Smithfield on Wednesday 22 October, 2014

Detectives are continuing their inquiries and have renewed their appeals for anyone with further information to come forward.

Police are urging anyone with information in relation to this incident to call Crime Stoppers on 1800 333 000 or use the Crime Stoppers online reporting page: https://nsw.crimestoppers.com.au/ Information you provide will be treated in the strictest of confidence. We remind people they should not report crime information via our Facebook and Twitter pages.

Bryson Anderson murder: Family and colleagues confront killers Mitchell and Fiona Barbieri in court


Mongel dog cop killers get eye-balled by colleagues, family and friends of slain police officer Bryson Anderson and ball their eyes out.

By court reporter Karl Hoerr

Mon 24 Nov 2014

Detective Inspector Bryson Anderson, who was killed at a rural property in Oakville.

Photo: Family and colleagues described their grief over the murder of Detective Inspector Bryson Anderson. (Facebook: NSW Police.)

Family and colleagues of a Sydney police officer murdered nearly two years ago have described their continuing grief over his stabbing death during a sentencing hearing for his killers.

One by one, those closest to Bryson Anderson rose to speak at the sentencing hearing for Mitchell and Fiona Barbieri.

The 45-year-old Detective Inspector was fatally stabbed during a siege of a home at Oakville in Sydney’s north-west.

His 13-year-old son told the court he has been denied the rite of passage of having his father teach him to shave.

“I had to learn this skill alone, without him by my side,” he said.

He spoke about his difficulties enjoying cricket, something he used to share with his father.

You should save the tears that you have shed from the dock. You will not be forgiven

Bryson Anderson’s brother, Warwick Anderson

Mitchell Barbieri, who attacked Detective Anderson with a knife and has pleaded guilty to murder, cried in the dock as the victim impact statements were read out.

His mother, Fiona Barbieri, has pleaded guilty to manslaughter on the grounds of mental illness and showed little emotion.

The officer’s brother, Warwick Anderson, addressed Mitchell Barbieri directly.

“You should save the tears that you have shed from the dock. You will not be forgiven,” Mr Anderson said.

Widow Donna Anderson said she had lost her best friend.

“I never contemplated how it would feel to be on the other side of a police investigation,” she said.

Colleagues who witnessed the attack spoke of their guilt and extreme difficulty returning to work.

Sergeant Adam Fitzgibbon said: “At times, I question myself. How did I let this happen to Bryson?”

Senior Constable Neil Constable said Detective Anderson had praised his work just hours before he was murdered.

“He told me to keep it up and keep locking up the crooks,” he said.

Justice Robert Allan Hulme appeared visibly moved by the statements.

“It’s simply astounding that such a senseless act can have so many victims,” he said.

The sentencing hearing continues.


Mother and son to stand trial for stabbing murder of Sydney police officer Bryson Anderson

Wed 11 Dec 2013, 6:39pm

A mother and son have been committed to stand trial for the stabbing murder of Sydney police officer Bryson Anderson.

Fiona Barbieri, 46, and her 20-year-old son Mitchell Barbieri are accused of killing Detective Inspector Anderson when he was called to a neighbourhood dispute at Oakville in Sydney’s north-west in 2012.

They are charged with murder and wounding with intent to resist arrest.

In Central Local Court magistrate Chris O’Brien has ordered them to stand trial in February 2014.

Police say they went to the property in December 2012 after an urgent call from a neighbour.

The officer was one of a large contingent of police called to the Oakfield home to attend a heated dispute between neighbours.

They say the Barbieri’s fired arrows at them from the house.

Officers say when the Detective Inspector tried to negotiate with them he was stabbed in the neck by Mitchell Barbieri and his mother Fiona Barbieri hit the officer with a hammer.

Magistrate O’Brien said after hearing the evidence there is a “reasonable prospect” a jury would “convict the accused”.

The mother and son have not yet entered a plea to the charges but will be required to in February.

Outside court members of his family told reporters they are pleased the Barbieri’s will stand trial.

Police officer in tears

During the committal hearing today police officer Constable Hannah Watson broke down in tears while giving evidence.

She told the hearing she thought her duty officer had been punched, because she could not see a weapon in Mitchell Barbieri’s hand.

When the officer began sobbing the court was adjourned to allow her to compose herself.

One officer described Fiona Barbieri screaming at police to leave, using foul language.

In court two new charges of resisting arrest were laid against the mother and son.


‘He deserves to f****** die': Court hears how police-killing mother and son shouted as their victim died… before emailing Russian president Vladimir Putin demanding asylum

  • Fiona Barbieri, and her son Mitchell, pleaded guilty to killing Detective Inspector Bryson Anderson in 2012 
  • Following her arrest, Fiona defended their actions as self-defence during a police interview 
  • The Barbieris had also sent emails to Tony Abbott and Mr Putin, saying: ‘We have every right to defend ourselves, our family and our property’
  • Inspector Anderson died after he was stabbed by then 19-year-old Mitchell Barbieri following a siege at their rural Oakville property
  • As he lay dying, the court heard that Fiona was heard yelling, ‘it’s his own f****** fault… he deserves to f****** die’
  • His family remember him as a larrikin with a great sense of humour
  • He also volunteered as a firefighter and in the Special Olympics  

A Sydney mother, who pleaded guilty to the manslaughter of a police officer in 2012, sent emails to the Prime Minister and the Russian President in which she defended herself and demanded asylum.

Fiona Barbieri, 47, and her 21-year-old son Mitchell, attended their sentencing hearing in Sydney’s Supreme Court on Wednesday, where the full details surrounding the death of Detective Inspector Bryson Anderson were revealed.

Inspector Anderson died after he was fatally stabbed by then 19-year-old Mitchell Barbieri following a siege at a rural Oakville property in Sydney’s north-west on December 6, 2012.

The police interview of Fiona Barbieri after her arrest in 2012, following the death of a policeman at her  property in Sydney's north-west, was shown to Sydney's Supreme Court on Wednesday

The police interview of Fiona Barbieri after her arrest in 2012, following the death of a policeman at her  property in Sydney’s north-west, was shown to Sydney’s Supreme Court on Wednesday

The 41-year-old and her 21-year-old son Mitchell (pictured) pleaded guilty to killing Detective Inspector Bryson Anderson

The 41-year-old and her 21-year-old son Mitchell (pictured) pleaded guilty to killing Detective Inspector Bryson Anderson

During a police interview following the Barbieri’s arrests in 2012, the 47-year-old mother who is believed to have been suffering from paranoid schizophrenia, told officers that Inspector Anderson had been killed in self-defence before demanding asylum in Russia.

In the footage of the police interview attained by Channel Nine, Fiona is heard saying: ‘what happened at our house today, where we were ambushed by an army of police officers, was self-defence.’

She is then handed a telephone by the officers who allow her to call the consulate, to whom she says: ‘It is the Barbieris, president Putin, SOS Australia.’

According to Channel Nine, Fiona was advised by the consulate to forward her request via email, after which she refused to answer further questions from the policemen.

DECORATED police officer Bryson Anderson was "struck" by "two quick jabbing moves around a doorway" by a teenager with a "deliberate intention", a court has heard today.</p>
<p>The accounts of Detective Inspector Anderson's colleagues, who witnessed his death at a home in Oakville on December 6 last year, have been revealed during a pre committal hearing.</p>
<p>Mitchell Barbieri, 19, and his mother Fiona Barbieri, 45, have been charged with Inspector Anderson's murder after the seasoned officer was called to the property over a neighbourhood dispute and then fatally stabbed.

Inspector Anderson (pictured) died after he was fatally stabbed by then 19-year-old Mitchell following a siege at his rural Oakville home on December 6, 2012

In the police interview, Fiona is handed a telephone after demanding asylum in Russia. Police allowed her to call the consulate, to whom she says: 'It is the Barbieris, president Putin, SOS Australia'

In the police interview, Fiona is handed a telephone after demanding asylum in Russia. Police allowed her to call the consulate, to whom she says: ‘It is the Barbieris, president Putin, SOS Australia’

Fiona Barbieri arrives at the Supreme Court in Sydney for her sentencing  hearing on Wednesday

‘We are living here in convict Australia, corrupt convict Australia, and we have been doing our best to get out,’ she told officers.

‘The New South Wales police force is corrupt – that is what we have been standing up against and that is why we are in here today.’ 

Crown prosecutor Mark Tedeschi QC told the Supreme Court on Wednesday that Fiona and her son had been embroiled in a long-running dispute with their neighbour, which had been fuelled by Ms Barbieri’s paranoia.

On December 6, the tension spiralled out of control when the Barbieris spotted that Mr Waters was installing flood lights on his property.

Fiona – swinging a baseball bat – and Mitchell – armed with a crossbow – confronted the electricians working for Mr Waters.

The wife and brother of slain police officer  Anderson, Donna (left) and Warwick (right), leave the Supreme Court after the hearing

The parents of Mr Anderson, Red and Shirley Anderson, were also seen leaving the Supreme Court on Wednesday

Earlier in the month, the Barbieris cried and hugged in the dock as they prepared to plea to their roles in the death of Detective Inspector Anderson

Mitchell fired two arrows, narrowly missing them both, before he and his mother retreated into their home.

As the first police arrived, the court heard the Barbieris sent an email to a number of politicians, including then opposition leader Tony Abbott and Russian President Vladimir Putin, saying: ‘We have every right to defend ourselves, our family and our property.’

Just over an hour later, it had become a ‘siege situation’ with Fiona and Mitchell screaming at police to ‘f*** off’.

Det Insp Anderson ordered the door to be kicked in and was stabbed twice by Mitchell – once in the cheek and fatally to the chest, Mr Tedeschi said.

As he lay dying, the court heard that Fiona was heard screaming, ‘it’s his own f****** fault.. he fucking deserved it… let the dog c*** die… he deserves to f****** die’.

The policemand wife Donna, said her husband absolutely adored their three children

The policemans wife Donna, said her husband absolutely adored their three children

Murdered police officer Bryson Anderson honoured by family

Bryson Anderson with his wife Donna and children from left to right - Darcy, Cain and Olivia

Bryson Anderson with his wife Donna and children from left to right – Darcy, Cain and Olivia

On the morning they were due to stand trial last week, Mitchell pleaded guilty to the officer’s murder, while his mother – who suffers from paranoid schizophrenia – pleaded guilty to manslaughter on the grounds of substantial impairment.

Under legislation passed before parliament, a person convicted of the murder of a police officer while on duty faces a mandatory life sentence.

But Mr Tedeschi said this was not a situation where life imprisonment should apply as Mitchell was influenced by his mother’s delusions.

‘He (Mitchell) had been under the influence of his mother … and her delusions had to some degree been transferred to him,’ Mr Tedeschi said.

Olivia, Cain and Darcy could not speak highly enough of their deceased father

Olivia, Cain and Darcy could not speak highly enough of their deceased father

At officer Anderson's 2012 funeral, NSW Police Commissioner Andrew Scipione said the decorated officer was greatly admired by his fellow officers

Instead, he said the crown would be seeking a ‘very lengthy’ sentence.

Earlier in the month, Inspector Anderson’s family honoured the man who was a much-loved husband and father of three.

Bryson’s widow Donna Anderson and their three children Olivia, Darcy and Cain could not wipe the smiles off their faces when they told fond stories of how Bryson was always the larrikin of the family.

‘There was the policeman side to him which was incredibly serious – he took his job very seriously -but there was the family side of him where he was just the clown in every family gathering,’ Donna told Channel Nine’s ACA.

‘He just absolutely adored his kids,’ she said. He was a typical dad – he loved dad jokes and if he could embarrass the kids in front of their friends that was even better.’

Police officers and family attend the funeral of the slain officer at St. Patrick's Cathedral in Parramatta in 2012 

Police officers and family attend the funeral of the slain officer at St. Patrick’s Cathedral in Parramatta in 2012 

The family privately continue to struggle with their loss, and it will be some time before they finally come to terms with the tragedy

The family privately continue to struggle with their loss, and it will be some time before they finally come to terms with the tragedy

His three children could not speak highly enough of their father.

‘He would totally just love life – it was awesome,’ his only daughter Olivia said. ‘Yes, he liked to embarrass us.’

His eldest son, Darcy said he was a great dad who was always a joker.

‘He photo bombed a lot – my first cricket game in my photo – he was in the background,’ he said.

‘Cricket is my life – me and dad built the pitch out the front in 2003 I think.’

‘We got tonnes of dirt and just rolled it and got it all padded down and I just keep mowing it in.’

Bryson's only daughter Olivia said her father had a great love for life

Bryson’s only daughter Olivia said her father had a great love for life

Darcy loves cricket so much that his father helped build him a cricket pitch in their front yard

Darcy loves cricket so much that his father helped build him a cricket pitch in their front yard

Youngest son Cain said his father was always a joker who 'photo-bombed a lot'

Youngest son Cain said his father was always a joker who ‘photo-bombed a lot’

‘He would totally just love life – it was awesome,’ his only daughter Olivia (left) said. ‘Yes, he liked to embarrass us’ 

Bryson's family described him as a joker who had a great sense of humour

Bryson’s family described him as a joker who had a great sense of humour

‘He was always a joker – he photo-bombed a lot,’ his youngest son Cain said. 

While being dedicated to his family and career, he also managed to squeeze in volunteering with the Special Olympics, travelling to Vanuatu to give gifts to children and also volunteering as a firefighter.

‘He would come home from the police sometimes he would only be there for an hours or so and then the bells would go off and he would go out to a fire call and he did that for nine years,’ Donna said.

During the committal hearing last year, a number of police officers broke down as they recalled the murder.

At Detective Inspector Anderson’s 2012 funeral, NSW Police Commissioner Andrew Scipione said the decorated officer was admired by his fellow officers for his tenacity and determination, as well as his empathy and compassion.

‘He showed initiative and leadership; intelligence and perseverance; dedication and humility; and, memorably, a ready smile and an engaging way.

‘Bryson drew people to him, without guile and without effort.’

The matter will return to court later this month.

Mother and son Fiona and Mitchell Barbieri plead not guilty to Sydney policeman Bryson Anderson’s murder

Fri 7 Feb 2014, 1:41pm

 A mother and son accused of murdering a Sydney police officer have pleaded not guilty.

Fiona and Mitchell Barbieri formally entered their pleas in the NSW Supreme Court this morning ahead of their trial later this year.

The 46-year-old and her 20-year-old son were charged after the death of Detective Inspector Bryson Anderson at Oakville on Sydney’s north-western outskirts in December 2012.

Inspector Anderson was part of a large contingent of police called to attend a heated neighbourhood dispute.

Police say the Barbieri’s fired arrows at them from their house.

Inspector Anderson then tried to negotiate with the pair for several minutes, when he was allegedly stabbed in the neck by Mitchell Barbieri and hit with a hammer by Fiona Barbieri.

The 45-year-old officer was rushed by paramedics to Windsor Hospital but died soon afterwards.

The Barbieris have also pleaded not guilty to additional charges laid late last year of wounding with intent to resist arrest.

In an earlier hearing a fellow officer who witnessed Inspector Anderson’s death broke down in court as she recalled the events.

Constable Hannah Watson told the court she initially thought her duty officer had been punched, because she could not see a weapon in Mitchell Barbieri’s hand.


Mother, son admit to killing police officer Bryson Anderson

Updated 5 Nov 2014, 3:19pmWed 5 Nov 2014, 3:19pm

A mother and son have pleaded guilty to killing a New South Wales police officer called to their home in Sydney’s north-west.

According to police, Mitchell Barbieri, 21, and his 47-year-old mother, Fiona, barricaded themselves inside their Oakville home when New South Wales police officer Bryson Anderson responded to an urgent call from neighbours in December 2012.

They say the pair fired arrows at the officer and attacked the 45-year-old with a knife and a hammer.

Mitchell Barbieri pleaded guilty to murdering Anderson, while Fiona Barbieri pleaded not guilty to murder but guilty to the lesser charge of manslaughter.

Prosecutors accepted her guilty plea to the lesser charge because she had “a substantial impairment brought about by an abnormality of mind” at the time.

The pair made their pleas in the Supreme Court the day their six-week trial was due to start.

They will return to court next week for a sentencing hearing.

Anderson, who held the rank of Detective Inspector, was one of several officers who attended the Barbieris’ home after reports of a feud between neighbours.

Colleagues say that when he tried to negotiate with the family, he was stabbed in the neck by Mitchel Barbieri and hit with a hammer by his mother.

Newborn baby dumped down drain in Quakers Hill , 30-year-old mother charged with attempted Murder


What a sad but also appalling situation, for a mother (or father or both) to dump a baby physically down the drain, allegedly dropping the tot 2.4 metres. Thank god for a real hero and the babies guardian angel in cyclist family David Otte and his daughter Hayley who were riding past and heard the cries.

It is disgusting, but I understand the bleeding hearts who will rush to the mothers defence. This is bullshit.Take or leave the baby in hospital when it was born.


 update 25/11/2014

Dramatic moment miracle baby was pulled from storm drain after surviving five days

  • Newborn survived in five days before cyclists heard cries
  • Boy has bleeding on the brain but is in a stable condition
  • Mother, 30, made full confession, police tell court
  • She hid pregnancy from family and father

THE boy miraculously found alive in a storm drain after being allegedly dumped by his mother is bleeding from the brain but in a stable condition in hospital.

And as Sydney prays he recovers fully from his injuries this morning, a fresh image has emerged showing the dramatic moment rescuers pulled him to safety.

It shows a policeman holds aloft the boy, swaddled in a pink blanket, after going into the 2m drain after emergency services were tipped off by a couple of cyclists who heard the baby’s cries. The cyclists anxiously watch on.

The newborn’s 30-year-old mother was formally charged with the sickening incident in Blacktown Local Court yesterday.

DUMPED BABY HAD LUCK AND ELEMENTS ON HIS SIDE

Photo

Clip from The Today Show which captured the dramatic moment the drain baby was pulled alive from his home of five days. Picture: Jason Donnelly Source: Twitter

Despite the charge, the Samoan woman has been given the privilege of naming him – and has chosen a biblical name.

For legal reasons we cannot reveal it, but it is associated with one of the most infamous child death cases in Australian history.

Police told the court she had made a full admission, saying that she had put “the less than 24-hour-old baby down the drain knowing it may kill the baby”.

She allegedly went straight from Blacktown Hospital to the drain.

Also yesterday, it emerged the woman had hid her pregnancy from her family.

’Shame!’ Drama oustide drain baby court

Family and friends of the woman who dumped her newborn baby down a drain leave Blacktown Court. They cannot be identified for legal reasons. Picture: John Grainger. Source: Supplied

Her son lay for five days undiscovered inside the pit off a cycleway next to the M7 at Quakers Hill until bike riders heard him crying on Sunday morning and he was recovered, severely dehydrated.

Experts have said the combination of the lack of rain, insulation from the heat by concrete and babies’ natural ability to survive without food in early life all contributed to his survival.

Doctors confirmed his condition had improved in The Children’s Hospital at Westmead.

Family and community services minister Gabrielle Upton declined to comment when asked last night if she knew the mother had been allowed to name her baby.

Police will allege his mother left Blacktown Hospital on Tuesday afternoon, November 18, after giving birth at 1am that morning.

A soft toy is left at the site beside the M7 in Quakers Hill where the newborn was found

A soft toy is left at the site beside the M7 in Quakers Hill where the newborn was found on Sunday. Picture: Melvyn Knipe Source: News Corp Australia

She allegedly caught a bus and train to the stormwater drain, where she dumped the newborn. He was about 17 hours old when he was forced inside a small opening with a 200kg concrete lid covering the drain.

The woman broke up with a boyfriend in the early stages of her pregnancy this year and hid it from him, as well as from her family. It is possible he never realised he was to become a father.

The site where the drain is located along the M7 cycleway.

The site where the drain is located along the M7 cycleway. Source: Supplied

“It’s shocking. We had no idea, she seemed fine. I just thought she had put on a bit of weight,” a close family member said.

The court heard the woman, who lives in Quakers Hill with her aunt, uncle and a cousin, had no community ties and was a flight risk

Her immediate family members live in Samoa, where her parents are heavily involved in church missions.

Grasping each other’s hands and holding back tears, her relatives sat in court yesterday as a mental health examination was ordered. Outside the court a bystander shouted: “Shame.”

She made no application for bail, which was formally refused. The woman is due to appear in Penrith Local Court on Friday. The baby will remain in the care of the state.

Inside the drain you get a clearer indication of the 2.4m drop the child enduredafter bei

Inside the drain you get a clearer indication of the 2.4m drop the child endured after being dumped beside the M7. Picture Cameron Richardson Source: News Corp Australia

Patrick Morgan, Mark McAllister and Darren McIntyre were the first police officers on the

Westlink M7 staff use a crane to put the cover back onto the drain after it was removed earlier to save the baby. Picture: Cameron Richardson Source: News Corp Australia

Patrick Morgan, Mark McAllister and Darren McIntyre were the first police officers on the

Patrick Morgan, Mark McAllister and Darren McIntyre were the first police officers on the scene. Picture: Cameron Richardson Source: News Corp Australia

Originally published as Moment miracle baby was plucked from drain


update 24/11/2014

Samoan Mother of baby boy abandoned in drain near Sydney’s M7 charged with attempted murder

Mon 24 Nov 2014, 7:01am

A 30-year-old woman has been charged with the attempted murder of her newborn baby boy, who was found in a drain in Sydney’s west.

Cyclists heard the baby crying from the bottom of a two-and-a-half-metre drain near the M7 motorway at Quakers Hill on Sunday morning.

Police conducted an extensive search to find the baby’s mother, including hospital record checks and doorknocks.

On Sunday afternoon a 30-year-old woman from Quakers Hill was arrested after attending Blacktown police station.

She has been charged with attempted murder and will face Blacktown local court today.

It is believed the baby was born on Monday and police will allege he was placed in the drain the following day.

The baby was taken to Westmead Children’s Hospital where he remains in a stable condition.

The woman has been refused bail and has been remanded in custody.

Baby sounded like a ‘kitten screaming’

David Otte and his daughter Hayley said they were riding along the M7’s cycleway when they thought they heard a kitten screaming.

“No-one in their right mind would ever come across something like this,” Mr Otte said.

They could hear the baby’s cries from a small opening in the drain but were unable to lift the lid.

“We couldn’t get it off. We couldn’t get it off, we had to wait to help the police,” he said.

“Luckily we were there, right place right time. There was someone looking over us and told us to stop and have a look.

“At the end of the day we need to find what the truth is behind it and really find out if we can help the little fella.”

Both he and his daughter were deeply shaken and thought at one point the baby had died.

“All I wanted was for this baby to be safe so I’m glad that we got there and saved him,” Hayley Otte said.

Newborn would not have survived hot day

As Sydney’s west sweltered in 40 degree plus heat on Sunday, the chances of the baby surviving if he was not found were slim, police said.

Inspector David Lagats said finding the baby inside a drain was horrific.

“It was already undernourished and dehydration would have taken effect,” he said.

“The baby was conscious and breathing.

“He was removed from the drain and placed in the care of police.

“Ambulance were called and he’s been taken to the Westmead Children’s Hospital.”

ASHLEE MULLANY AND AAP
The Daily Telegraph
November 23, 2014 4:25PM

Newborn found in drain beside Sydney's M7
 This newborn baby boy was found down a drain at Quakers Hill this morning. Picture: NSW Police

THE mother of a baby found in a drain at Quakers Hill this morning has now been identified by police.

There are fears the newborn baby boy may have suffered internal injuries after being dropped down a 2.4m-deep drain near the M7 Motorway.

The dad and daughter who found the baby visited the Children’s Hospital at Westmead this afternoon to deliver a package of baby clothes.

David Otte and his daughter Hayley, as well as her mum Michelle, dropped off three sets of baby clothes, a new baby blanket and a face washer and towel.

“We wanted to see him, but the hospital said we weren’t able to at the moment,” Mr Otte said outside of hospital.

“We’d all really love a chance to see him again. Today has been such an emotional experience for everyone.”

Mrs Otte said the family was moved to give the little boy the gifts because “he really doesn’t have anything”.

“We have family, we have each other. He didn’t have anything.”

As a result of hospital record checks and doorknocks, the mother has been identified as a 20-year-old Quakers Hill woman.

She is currently assisting police with inquiries at Blacktown Police Station.

Mr Otte was cycling along the path with his 18-year-old daughter this morning when he heard the baby screaming.

“We were going on a leisurely ride, my daughter and I, and came across a noise that we could hear,” Mr Otte said.

“We actually thought it was a kitten and when we went down there we could hear exactly what it was, you could definitely tell it was a baby screaming.”

Mr Otte said he cycles on the path once a month and was about to turn around and head home when he heard the baby’s cries.

“Luckily we were there, someone was looking over us and told us to stop and have a look,” he said.

Cyclist David Otte and daughter Hayley found a baby boy whilst riding along a bike track

Cyclist David Otte and daughter Hayley found a baby boy whilst riding along a bike track beside the M7. Picture: Cameron Richardson bloody heroes!

Inspector David Lagats, from Quakers Hill police, said the boy was malnourished and undergoing medical tests at Westmead Children’s Hospital.

“He’s said to be in a serious but stable condition. The hospital estimates the baby to be two to three days old,” Insp Lagats said.

“He was already malnourished and dehydration would have taken effect so I would have had grave fears for the child’s welfare had it been exposed to this weather for the rest of the day.

“The umbilical cord had been cut and had been clamped. It appears to have had some medical intervention since its birth.”

Of concern is the height that the baby may have fallen from, Quakers Hill duty officer Inspector David Lagats said.

There was a gap between the ground and the concrete slab, big enough to put the child through, and police believe he dropped 2.4m.

Inside the drain you get a clearer indication of the 2.4m drop the child enduredafter bei

Inside the drain you get a clearer indication of the 2.4m drop the child endured after being dumped beside the M7. Picture Cameron Richardson

Patrick Morgan, Mark McAllister and Darren McIntyre were the first police officers on the

Westlink M7 staff use a crane to put the cover back onto the drain after it was removed earlier to save the baby. Picture: Cameron Richardson

The child is thought to be of Indian or Middle Eastern appearance.

Some of the cyclists who found him saw an Indian male in an orange shirt walking on the cycle track moments after they heard the baby’s cries.

Senior-Constable Mark McAlister was among the first on the scene and climbed into the drain with another detective to pull the distressed baby out.

“When I arrived there were several bike riders, cyclists and pedestrians standing around the drain. Myself and several other police have come up, we heard something coming from the drain,” Sen-Constable McAlister said.

Patrick Morgan, Mark McAllister and Darren McIntyre were the first police officers on the

Patrick Morgan, Mark McAllister and Darren McIntyre were the first police officers on the scene. Picture: Cameron Richardson

BUBS THAT WENT BEFORE…

August 2012: Six-week-old baby dumped on Joseph St, Lidcombe. Parents found arguing at Lidcombe station and child removed from family.

March 2013: Baby Ahn, abandoned hours after being born at Canterbury Hospital. 30-year-old Korean mother left him at the hospital.

April 2014: Baby “Mai”, 18-month-old left on the doorstep of a Western Sydney home. Mother was taken to immigration detention but released on a bridging visa.

“At least six of us have then lifted up the concrete drain lid, when we’ve opened it we’ve sighted the small baby wrapped up in a hospital blanket. He appeared very young.

“How could someone do it? I, myself, have kids and we’re expecting a baby in a few more months so it’s not good that someone’s going through this and has done this to a little one.

“It was a bit surreal really. It’s great that someone actually stopped and heard it and had the initiative to give us a call.”

A photo of the baby boy in Sen-Constable McAlister’s arms has been widely circulated on social media this morning as police attempt to find the baby’s parents.

Lisa Charet, district director from the Department of Families and Community Services, said it was likely the child would be released from hospital into the care of the state.

“At this stage we are really worried about his welfare and mum’s. We can give her the help and support that she needs. She must be feeling enormously distressed,” Ms Charet said.

The child’s cry was heard coming from beneath the concrete slab to the right. Picture: Ca

The child’s cry was heard coming from beneath the concrete slab to the right. Picture: Cameron Richardson

“When this sort of thing happens, people are in a place of desperation.”

With temperatures tipped to peak above 40C in Western Sydney today there were concerns the child would have died if he had been found later in the day.

‘Father-son DNA link’ between 1999 Irma Palasics killing and 2010 Woden break-in


A kid caught a few years back on CCTV trying to break into an old PitchnPutt venue may crack the cold case here. HIS DNA also belongs to the unidentified DNA of the man that murdered (or was present) in 1999 when Irma Palasics was bashed to death in the killers search for money and jewelery in the home…SOMEONE can help, and knows who it is! This new DNA technique could soon be solving Crimes decades old on a regular basis through the children of criminals

Make sure to watch the 60 minutes story which run last night. (2 parts down the page)

Simply put this persons father was involved. The first of the young group of fools who tried to break into PitchnPutt may be able to make 500,000 by identifying the person in the video leading to an arrest and conviction!

A murder mystery like no other – two apparently unrelated crimes, 11 years apart. One is a relatively harmless teenage prank. The other a cowardly murder of a Canberra grandmother. 72 year old Irma Palacsics was bashed and murdered in her own home in 1999.  Fifteen years on, the killers probably thought they’d got away with it, but a recent break-in at a local “pitch and putt”, has this cold case warming up. Extraordinary new forensic science has linked the two crimes and, now, a son is about to betray his killer father.

Mon 3 Nov 2014, 1:57pm

New DNA technology has linked the cold-case murder of a 72-year-old woman in 1999 to a golf course burglary more than 10 years later, ACT Policing say.

Irma Palasics and her husband Gregor were bound, gagged and viciously bashed when two men broke in and ransacked their home on Grover Crescent in McKellar on November 6, 1999.

After the offenders left, Mr Palasics was able to free himself and phone police, but Mrs Palasics died from her injuries.

Mr Palasics, severely injured, traumatised and grief-stricken, died within a year.

Years later, sensitive new technology used to examine DNA evidence from the scene linked Mrs Palasics’ death to what would seem like an unconnected incident in 2010, when four teenagers broke into the Woden Pitch and Putt.

Police have revealed the DNA evidence suggested a child-parent link, between a perpetrator of the Pitch and Putt break-in and what happened at the Palasics’ home.

Senior Constable Jarryd Dunbar told Channel Nine the tests suggested the son of one of Mrs Palasics’ attackers was involved in the Pitch and Putt break-in, although there was a small possibility it could have been someone from his extended family.

He said the son was believed to have been at an 18th birthday party at the Slovenian-Australian Association across the road from the Pitch and Putt earlier that evening.

“Whoever was at that party will be able to identify who those persons are in the CCTV,” he said.

Call to Crime Stoppers ended before information was given

Police said that on October 20 this year, a man contacted Crime Stoppers and indicated he could identify people in the CCTV footage but ended the call before providing any information.

“This is a horrific crime which happened in the sanctity of someone’s own home,” Senior Constable Dunbar said.

“Come forward and give us the information we need, so the family can put this crime behind them.

“[Gregor] went to his death a few years later always with the thought in his mind that he had failed in some way as a husband and as a protector.”

Police said they were not concerned about the act of vandalism at the Pitch and Putt, and this would not be a problem for anyone considering giving information.

“We don’t want your name, we just want the information you have that could lead to any convictions,” Crime Stoppers CEO Bryan Roach said.

Police said DNA from the murder scene was also placed on Interpol database with no match.

Facefit of suspect released

Prior to her death, Irma and her husband were robbed in 1997 and again in 1998 at their old home in Pelsart Street in Red Hill.

On June 29, 1997, an excess of $100,000 in cash, numerous items of expensive jewellery and a number of Australian $200 gold coins were taken.

About a year later on October 10, 1998, two men were disturbed by Mrs Palasics in the process of a another burglary.

Mrs Palasics was assaulted and during a struggle she managed to pull the balaclava from the head of one offender before both men escaped.

Police said new DNA technology had also helped them link the man wearing the balaclava to the eventual murder scene in McKellar.

DNA taken from a number of tape lifts from the balaclava matched DNA profiles from the the Palasics’ home after the murder.

Officers said it was the first time a link had been established between the two crime scenes.

Police were told by a witness to the aggravated robbery that a man got into a 1980s model silver or blue-coloured sedan with a possibly faulty headlines and ACT rego plates on Quiros Street in Red Hill.

Officers believe this man was one of the offenders.

The witness also told police he saw a second witness walking his dog in the area, who looked about 45 to 50 years old, around 186cm tall, with a solid build, short black, curly hair and a black beard.

The man was wearing black rimmed glasses, a dark long-sleeved shirt and long pants, and was walking a tan labrador or retriever dog.

Police said they suspected all three incidents were linked and have released a computer-generated image of a suspect from the 1998 burglary.

They have also released an image of the potential witness who was walking his dog.

Witnesses urged to come forward

There is a $500,000 reward for information leading to the conviction of Mrs Palasics’ killers and police have urged people with information to come forward to help solve the crime.

Mrs Palasics’ daughter Elizabeth Mikita said the family were unable to move on without knowing her killed their mother.

“She was a lovely, caring person, much loved by her family and friends and we think about her every day,” she said.

“Her death has been devastating and while we continue to recover 15 years on, we need to know who killed her and why.

“Without answers to these questions we cannot move forward, we cannot rest and we cannot overcome our grief.”

Ms Mikita said the people who killed her mother not only took her life, but also her father’s.

“He was never the same after her death. He died believing that he had failed to protect his wife. It wasn’t his fault and he didn’t deserve to live out the final years of his life blaming himself,” she said.

Anyone with information is asked to contact Crime Stoppers on 1800 333 000, or via the website. Information can be provided anonymously.

A special phone-in to try to uncover more information about the case has been organised for Thursday – the 15th anniversary of Mrs Palasics’ death.

Irma Palasics – $500 000 reward

About 9.30pm on Saturday 6 November 1999 two men forced their way into the McKellar home of elderly couple, Gregor and Irma Palasics.

The couple were bound and savagely beaten before the men ransacked their home and stole cash and jewellery. Irma did not survive her injuries and died at the scene.

Gregor and Irma were victims of a burglary in 1997 and an aggravated burglary in 1998 when they lived in Red Hill.

During the burglary in 1997 unknown offender(s) stole a large sum of cash and jewellery.

Police suspect that a possible link exists between the burglaries in 1997 and 1998 and the home invasion (aggravated burglary) on 6 November which resulted in the murder of Irma Palasics.

60 Minutes Exclusive

See the full 60 Minutes episode

or part one a part 2 here http://www.jump-in.com.au/show/60minutes/stories/2014/october/who-killed-irma/

Pitch and Putt CCTV

Public appeal video

Recent developments

In August 2012 police released CCTV footage of an attempted aggravated burglary at Pitch & Putt in Phillip which took place 1.50am, Sunday 16 May 2010. Five teenagers appear in the CCTV footage, showing them break into the Pitch & Putt golf course by charging at the metal roller door of the storage area.

Police believe forensic evidence links the Pitch & Putt attempted burglary with the crime scene in November 1999 which resulted in the murder of Irma Palasics.

Police are urging anyone with any information, no matter how small, to call Crime Stoppers on 1800 333 000. Information can be provided anonymously.

A $500 000 reward is in place for information leading to the apprehension and subsequent conviction of the person(s) responsible for Irma’s murder and an appropriate indemnity from prosecution will be considered for any accomplice who first gives information.

Reward poster for Irma (PDF)

Media releases for Irma

AFL player Trent Dumont -North Melbourne Kangaroos footballer allegedly Robs Taxi Driver-Another hero


So the AFL media are protecting another loser! This bloke Trent Dumont… What a tool, a grub, and another loser who had no idea how good he had it! Apparently thumped the driver and robbed him of his cash!

How did Trent Dumont get himself into this, not a good look

How did Trent Dumont get himself into this, not a good look is it

North Melbourne player under police investigation

October 28, 2014 – 4:02PM

A North Melbourne player is under police investigation for an alleged robbery of a taxi driver in South Australia.

The incident reportedly happened in the early hours of Sunday October 12.

The player was one of two men involved in the incident where the driver was allegedly threatened and money was stolen.

In a statement issued on Tuesday afternoon, the Kangaroos said: “The North Melbourne Football Club can confirm that a member of its playing list is currently assisting South Australian Police in relation to an incident that is alleged to have occurred in South Australia earlier this month.

“As this is a matter of ongoing police inquiry, no further comment will be made by the club until it is in a position to do so.”


North Melbourne AFL player investigated over taxi incident

Posted about an hour agoTue 28 Oct 2014, 6:07pm

The AFL has confirmed a North Melbourne player is one of two men under police investigation over the alleged robbery of a taxi driver in South Australia.

Police have not yet named the player.

He and another man were alleged to have threatened the driver in the early hours of October 12.

The pair was alleged to have assaulted the driver when he refused their demands, stolen his money and fled the scene.

Police said the taxi driver was not seriously hurt.

The club said the man was a member of the playing list and was “currently assisting South Australian Police” in relation to the incident.

“As this is a matter of ongoing police inquiry, no further comment will be made by the club until it is in a position to do so,” North Melbourne said in a statement.


North Melbourne’s Trent Dumont charged over alleged robbery of taxi driver

October 28, 2014 – 4:02PM

North Melbourne player Trent Dumont has been charged over an alleged robbery of a taxi driver in South Australia earlier this month.

The club confirmed on Tuesday that 19-year-old Dumont, who has yet to play a game for the club, was the player who had been arrested by South Australian police.

Dumont was one of two men involved in an incident that reportedly happened on the morning of October 12 in which a taxi driver was allegedly threatened before money was stolen.

Dumont and a second man, also aged 19, have been bailed and will appear in South Australia’s Holden Hill Magistrates Court late next month.

In a statement issued on Tuesday afternoon, the Kangaroos said: “As this is a matter of ongoing police enquiry, no further comment will be made by the club until it is in a position to do so.”

Police released CCTV footage on Monday of two men inside the cab and the second man was arrested later that evening after contacting authorities.

Further enquiries on Tuesday led to Dumont’s arrest.

Hailing from South Australia, the 19-year-old was North Melbourne’s second selection in the 2013 national draft and was tipped to make his senior debut next year.

Thomas Lock is the Stepfather charged with rape, murder of toddler in Coffs Harbour


20 minutes alone with a tiny precious little girl is all this monster needed to engage in vile acts, raping the tiny princess resulting in her death. A tiny window of opportunity that has devastated a family and a community.

I have details on this mongrel dog, but will not expose him until mainstream do. My thoughts are with the devastated family of the little girl.

Man charged with raping and murdering a two-year-old toddler

  • In community’s interest to name suspect, says magistrate
  • Crime described as ‘extremely serious matter’
  • Offence allegedly committed while mother was out for 20 minutes
  • Child taken to hospital with injuries to abdomen
  • Lost consciousness while being examined, died Easter Sunday

THE man who allegedly raped and murdered his de-facto two-year-old daughter at their coastal home in Coffs Harbour has failed in his bid to hide his identity.

Visiting magistrate Robert Rabbidge this morning ruled it in the community’s interest to identify the alleged child killer, who allegedly molested and murdered the toddler between 7pm and 2.15am on April 20.

Thomas Lock, 23, was arrested by child abuse squad detectives yesterday afternoon and charged with murder, sexual intercourse with a person under 10-years-old and possession of 2g of methylamphetamine.

He was not forced by Mr Rabbidge to appear in court, after his defence team said he “didn’t want to come today”.

Mr Rabbidge described the alleged rape and murder as an “extraordinarily serious matter” and “distressing crimes”.

In reference to suppressing the suspect’s identity, Mr Rabbidge said “representing the community, I’m not convinced that I should make such an order”.

The toddler’s name has been suppressed.

“In my view that (the name of perpetrator) should not be suppressed,” Mr Rabbidge said.

Family of the child’s biological father attended court for the brief mention but did not speak to media.

Outside court, Coffs Harbour crime manager Detective Superintendent Darren Jameson said police would allege the child suffered injuries to her abdominal section during a 20-minute window that the mother was out of the family home.

“The child has suffered injuries to her abdomen,” Det Supt Jameson said.

“It will be alleged the mother was not present when the injuries were received in a short timeframe.”

The Daily Telegraph has leaned it took some days before police were made aware of the injuries sustained by the toddler. That information resulted in a murder investigation and the subsequent murder charge.

The child’s mother had taken her daughter to Coffs Harbour Health Campus about 8pm on Easter Sunday night and died the following morning.

While she was being examined, the toddler lost consciousness.

Lock did not apply for bail and will re-appear at Coffs Harbour Local Court on July 22.

Police have arrested a man, 23, over the murder and sexual assault of a two-year-old girl.

Police have arrested a man, 23, over the murder and sexual assault of a two-year-old girl.

DETECTIVES investigating the death of a toddler at Coffs Harbour have charged the child’s step father with murder and aggravated sexual assault.

About 8pm on Sunday April 20, the two-year-old girl was taken to Coffs Harbour Health Campus.

She died the following morning, police said.

Police from Coffs/Clarence Local Area Command were called to the hospital and have investigated the incident.

Forensic police conduct an investigation at the family home of a toddler who was raped and killed, on Easter Monday.

Forensic police conduct an investigation at the family home of a toddler who was raped and killed, on Easter Monday.

On Thursday,  a 23-year-old man was arrested at Coffs Harbour Police Station around 1pm.

The man, from Coffs Harbour, was subsequently charged with murder and aggravated sexual assault on a child under 10 years.

Police will allege the offences took place at a Karuah Ave unit, while the child’s mother was not present.

He will appear at Coffs Harbour Local Court on Friday.

Forensic investigators at the Coffs Harbour family home of the toddler, who police allege was murdered by a 23-year-old man.
Forensic investigators at the Coffs Harbour family home of the toddler, who police allege was murdered by a 23-year-old man. Frank Redward

 Stepfather charged with rape, murder of toddler in Coffs Harbour

May 02, 2014 9:48AM

Forensic police conduct an investigation at the family home of a toddler who was raped

Forensic police conduct an investigation at the family home of a toddler who was raped and killed, on Easter Monday. Picture: Frank Redward Source: Supplied

THE stepfather of a two-year-old girl has been charged with her rape and murder in northern NSW over Easter.

Police allege the 23-year-old man raped and murdered the little girl during a 20-minute period when her mother was out of the family home.

Detective Inspector Darren Jamieson told ABC Radio that the girl received “a series of blows to her abdomen, which caused an injury that later lead to her death”.

The girl was taken to Coffs Harbour Health Campus on Easter Sunday but died the day later.

“She deteriorated very, very quickly and as a result she died in the early hours of Monday the 21st of April.”

He told Macquarie Radio he believed the toddler was attacked while her mother was out of home for 20 minutes.

Her stepfather was arrested yesterday afternoon at Coffs Harbour, following an almost two-week long investigation.

He is due before Coffs Harbour Local Court today, facing charges of murder and aggravated sexual assault with a child under 10.

He will also face drug charges.

Adrian Bayley Pleads Guilty to Rape – Not Guilty to Murdering Jill Meagher


MAJOR UPDATE 26/03/2015

Jill Meagher killer Adrian Bayley found guilty of three more rapes

Updated 3 minutes ago

One of Australia’s most notorious predators, murderer and serial rapist Adrian Bayley, has been found guilty of three more brutal rapes of young women in Melbourne in the years before he murdered Jill Meagher.

Bayley, 43, raped and murdered the 29-year-old ABC staffer as she walked home from a night out in Brunswick in Melbourne’s north in September 2012, in a crime that shocked the nation.

Now, it has been proven beyond reasonable doubt that Bayley raped other women, including a young Dutch tourist in 2012, and two young prostitutes – one of them also in 2012 and the other almost 15 years ago.

Bayley pleaded not guilty in all three rape trials before the County Court, forcing the victims to give evidence and re-live their trauma in a series of trials that began last year and ended today.

His defence argued that while they did not dispute that the women had been victims of sexual assault, they had mistaken their attacker for Bayley because he had been so prominent in the media.

Broad suppression orders have prevented publication of any details from the three rape trials.

But with the return of the third guilty verdict the suppressions have been lifted.

Adrian Bayley pleaded not guilty in all three trials

The victim in the first trial, held in July last year, was 18 years old in late 2000, and the court heard was from a good home, but became hooked on heroin when she was 14 and turned briefly to prostitution.

In his closting arguments, Senior Prosecutor Peter Rose QC said Bayley, who worked shiftwork in a nearby bakery at the time, was the woman’s third client and her last.

Horrific details emerged in court of the teenager’s sustained ordeal at the hands of Bayley, after he drove her in his car into a narrow laneway in St Kilda, out of sight of passing traffic.

Raping his victims in his car after parking it in confined spaces to ensure they could not escape would become a critical hallmark of Bayley’s offending.

Mr Rose said that at one point during the assault, another car drove into the laneway, and the teenager banged on the back window and mouthed “help me, please help me”.

But Bayley put his fingers down her throat so she could not breathe and threatened to kill her and the car drove away.

“[Bayley] said ‘you little slut, no-one will miss you’,” Mr Rose told the first jury.

“She was frozen with fear … she had never felt such fear in her life.

“She believed he was taking her somewhere to kill her.”

The prosecutor told the court it would be 11 years before she told authorities what had happened, later telling police “it all added up” when she heard about Ms Meagher’s murder, and saw Bayley’s image.

When she read about Jill Meagher, she immediately identified [Adrian Bayley’s] face.

Senior Prosecutor Peter Rose QC

“When she read about Jill Meagher, she immediately identified his face,” Mr Rose said.

In a chilling twist of the case, the court heard when she was first approached by Bayley, the teenager had just come from a prostitutes’ collective centre where she had been given a pamphlet with warnings of “bad men” who had been harassing local sex workers.

The 18-year-old was reading the pamphlet when she got into Bayley’s car and told him she could not believe “how many bad people are out there”.

Bayley told her he was “one of those bad guys”, Mr Rose said.

Two more rapes just months before Jill Meagher attack

The victim in the second rape trial was another street prostitute attacked by Bayley several months before the fatal attack on Ms Meagher.

The court heard she was 25 years old when Bayley picked her up in his car and drove it into a narrow, dead-end laneway in Elwood in April 2012.

Bayley told his victim that it was stupid she did not have a pimp or a “spotter” looking out for her, the prosecutor said.

Key points

  • Adrian Bayley was brought to three separate trials from July 2014 for three rapes
  • One of the rapes happened in 2000 and two in 2012
  • He was found guilty in all three trials, after pleading not guilty
  • Suppression orders on reporting were lifted upon the conclusion of third case in March 2015
  • Bayley pleaded guilty to killing Jill Meagher in 2012 and was sentenced to life in prison, with a minimum of 35 years
  • He had previously served a total of 11 years in prison for the rape and attempted rape of a total of eight women
  • He was first jailed in 1991 for a minimum of three years for raping two teenagers and attempting to rape another when he was 19
  • He was jailed again in 2001 for a minimum of eight years for raping five prostitutes over six months in 2000
  • In 2012 while on parole, he assaulted a man in Geelong
  • Bayley was on parole when he raped and murdered Ms Meagher and when he raped two other women in preceding months

Mr Rose told the court that when the victim struck out with her legs, cracking the windscreen, Bayley told her that he could “keep her for ages” and no-one would know she was missing.

At one point during the attack, the court heard Bayley wound up the car’s windows to muffle his victim’s screams.

The court heard he was also preoccupied with her identifying him from his tattoos.

Eventually, she convinced him to drive to a nearby hotel to use the bathroom, and when she came out and refused his demand to get back into the car, he drove away.

It was eight months later, three months after Jill Meagher was murdered, that the 25-year-old saw a police photo on a television report about another sex attack in St Kilda and called Crime Stoppers.

The jury in the second trial took less than an hour to return a guilty verdict.

In the third trial, the victim gave evidence via video-link from the Netherlands.

The prosecutor told the court that the Dutch tourist was walking home alone from the popular Elephant and Wheelbarrow pub in St Kilda in July 2012 on the night she was attacked.

She had been walking for half an hour from the beach precinct and was almost at St Kilda Road near her Balaclava share house, when she noticed two cars parked by the side of the road.

Mr Rose said the 27-year-old was “a little drunk” and when the driver of one of the cars beckoned her over to tell her he had seen a car following her and offered to drive her home, she got in.

He covered her mouth to stop her yelling and held her throat. He told her she couldn’t get out and no-one would hear her. She was afraid she was going to be killed.

Senior Prosecutor Peter Rose QC

That man was Bayley, Mr Rose told the court, and instead of taking her home, he drove to a small dark parking space near some apartments and “stopped between two fences”.

“She asked to get out … he said no,” Mr Rose told the jury.

“He said, ‘you can’t get out so you may as well have sex with me’.

“He then hit her to the side of the face … he covered her mouth to stop her yelling and held her throat. He told her she couldn’t get out and no-one would hear her.

“She was afraid she was going to be killed.”

Mr Rose said the young woman capitulated in fear for her life and encouraged Bayley to come back to her house, in the hope of escaping.

When he agreed and drove her home, she ran inside screaming and locked herself in the bathroom.

She told her housemates she thought she was going to die … she was crying hysterically.

Senior Prosecutor Peter Rose QC

The court heard Bayley took several steps inside the share house but fled when he realised other people were home.

The woman’s housemates called triple-0.

“She told her housemates she thought she was going to die … she was crying hysterically,” Mr Rose said.

Two months later, Bayley attacked Jill Meagher.

He was arrested five days later at his Coburg home, and led detectives to a shallow grave on a quiet road on Melbourne’s outer north-western fringe.

Bayley’s phone records, obtained during the investigation of Ms Meagher’s murder, showed that he was in St Kilda on the night of the backpacker’s rape.

Defence argued false identification of Adrian Bayley

The media blackout extended across all three County Court trials and jurors in all three of them were told nothing of the other cases pending against Bayley.

But such is Bayley’s notoriety in light of Ms Meagher’s rape and death, the court and lawyers took the extraordinary step of telling the pool of potential jurors at each trial exactly who he was in relation to that crime, right from the beginning.

“That is Adrian Bayley,” said defence lawyer Saul Holt, pointing across the courtroom during his opening statement in the third trial, just concluded.

That is Adrian Bayley … You know who he is.

Defence lawyer Saul Holt tells jurors as he points across the court

“You know who he is.”

Mr Holt said even if jurors had not been told of Bayley’s background, “you would probably have found out on your own anyway”.

“Please remember when you were empanelled, you were confident you could be impartial,” he told the jury.

“You took an oath to try this case only on the evidence. Please don’t fill in the gaps … distasteful as [the Jill Meagher case] is.”

Judge Sue Pullen also cautioned the jurors.

“It’s absolutely essential you put it out of your minds completely,” Judge Pullen said.

“It is essential not to look on the internet … or to investigate the background of Mr Bayley.

“We all have biases, we all have prejudices. I don’t expect everyone to lose them overnight but … you have to make a decision coldly, clinically.”

In all three trials, Mr Holt told jurors the defence did not dispute the victims were brutally raped, and that “something awful” happened to them.

But he told the juries, the victims had it wrong.

“In September 2012 he was arrested for the rape and murder of Jill Meagher and his details were everywhere … she [the victim] has identified things that she says were from him and that she’s got elsewhere,” Mr Holt said in the second trial of Bayley.

“Use your head, not your heart. Suspend your disbelief about the fact that I would defend him after all that you know about him.

“She [the victim] has jumped on the Adrian Bayley bandwagon.”

In returning three guilty findings, the jurors ultimately disagreed.

One of Victoria’s most violent criminals

The convictions add to a virtually unsurpassed record of violent sexual offending from a man in and out of prison and on the radar of authorities over many years, who was on parole when he attacked some of his victims, including Ms Meagher.

That last fatal attack on Ms Meagher horrified the community, leading to an enormous outpouring of grief and anger, with mainstream and social media coverage of a volume never seen before.

The extent of Bayley’s offending was last revealed when he was sentenced by Supreme Court Justice Geoffrey Nettle in June 2013 to life in prison, with a non-parole period of 35 years for the rape and murder of Ms Meagher.

“As your criminal record reveals, you are a recidivist violent sexual offender … in terms of moral culpability your killing of the deceased ranks among the worst kinds conceivable,” Justice Nettle told Bayley.

At the time, it emerged Bayley had been targeting, threatening and raping women his entire adult life.

His victims included his 16-year-old sister’s friend 25 years ago, a teenage hitchhiker and a series of St Kilda street workers in 16 rapes a decade later.

It was those crimes Bayley spent eight years in prison before his release on parole in 2010.

Adrian Bayley admitted raping and strangling Jill Meagher in a Melbourne laneway, but has pleaded not guilty to her murder.  The 41 year old will stand trial in the Victorian Supreme Court after the Deputy Chief Magistrate found there was enough evidence for a jury to convict him.  Bayley pleaded guilty to one count of rape in the Melbourne Magistrates Court yesterday and not guilty to murder and another two charges of rape.

UPDATE 5TH MAY 2013

Adrian Bayley arriving at court 5th May 2013

Adrian Bayley arriving at court 5th May 2013

ADRIAN Bayley has arrived at the Supreme Court for a hearing over the death of Melbourne woman Jill Meagher, where he is expected to plead guilty to charges of murder. More to come…

Bayley, 41, pleaded guilty in the Melbourne Magistrates’ Court on March 12 to one count of raping Ms Meagher.

He pleaded not guilty to her murder and two of three counts of rape.

Bayley was set to stand trial over the murder in a Brunswick laneway in September – a year after the crime that shocked the nation.

Last moments of Jill Meagher’s life

  • by: Paul Anderson – From: Herald Sun
  • March 13, 2013 8:59AM

THE man accused of murdering Jill Meagher ran out of petrol after burying the Irish-born ABC employee in a shallow grave, according to court documents.

A police summary of the case against Adrian Bayley, tendered in court, was released to the media after Bayley’s committal hearing yesterday.According to the summary, on the night of September 21 last year, while Ms Meagher was out celebrating with friends in Brunswick, Bayley was arguing with his girlfriend at Swanston St’s Lounge Bar.

The pipeline layer, 41, was arguing with her about “jealousy and possessiveness”. His girlfriend left and returned to their home in Coburg.

“The accused (Bayley) attempted to contact his girlfriend by phone; however, she refused to answer or return text messages and phone calls,” the summary stated.

Bayley left the Lounge Bar at 12.25am and caught a taxi home. There, he changed into a blue hoodie jumper, the summary said.It was about 1am when Ms Meagher, 29, left the Brunswick Green Hotel with a friend and walked to the Etiquette Bar.

Her friend left soon after, twice offering Ms Meagher a ride in a taxi. But she declined, deciding to walk the short distance home.

On her way, outside Chemist Warehouse, she asked a group of three people for a cigarette and had a “short friendly conversation” with the trio.

She then continued on her way along Sydney Rd, towards Hope St. Bayley was in the area by that stage, and saw Ms Meagher walking alone.

“(Bayley) has run up from behind Ms Meagher before slowing to a walk as he approached her.” The Police summary said

Bayley would later tell police: “I was just walking ahead of her and we’d already interacted on Sydney Rd and that’s when she rang her brother. She was actually telling me about her father.”

Ms Meagher called her brother, Michael McKeon, at 1.35am to talk about their sick father.
Mr McKeon said he would call her back in a minute or two. He would try, but his sister’s phone would ring out several times.

Ms Meagher’s husband, Tom, knew his wife was out for drinks with workmates.

At 1.37am, he sent her a text message from their home: “Are you okay?”

The Chief Crown prosecutor, Gavin Silbert, SC, told the court it was 1.38am when Bayley “accosted” Ms Meagher and “proceeded to drag her into a laneway on Hope St between Oven St and Sydney Rd, where he has raped and strangled her”.A bin and parked car in a laneway off Hope St, Brunswick, where Jill Meagher's handbag was found

Bayley later told detectives: “I actually apologised. I can’t imagine how she felt but I know how I felt. All I thought was, ‘What have I done?’ ”

Mr Silbert told the court: “(Bayley) has left the body of the deceased in the laneway and returned to his home address, where he has collected a shovel and his white Holden Astra.”

At 1.47am, an extremely worried Tom Meagher sent his wife another text.

“Answer me, I’m really worried,” it read.

He sent another at 2.07am: “Please pick up.”

The court heard Bayley returned to the laneway at 4.22am and put Ms Meagher’s body into the boot of the car.

He drove to Blackhill Rd, Gisborne South, where he buried Ms Meagher by the side of the road.

“I cried, man, and I dug a hole . . . I didn’t cry for me,” Bayley told detectives.

Tom Meagher, meanwhile, had searched the Brunswick streets in vain.

Adrian Bayley as he was taken into custody in the back of a police car. Picture: Stephen Harman

“I kept trying to ring her but there was no answer,” he said in his police statement.

Bayley was driving home from Gisborne when his car ran out of petrol near the Calder Highway.

He managed to wave down motorist Dayle Watkins, who drove him to a nearby service station.

There, about 6am, he filled a jerry can with petrol.

Mr Watkins then drove Bayley back to his vehicle.

On September 27, after investigating the crime scene and gathering evidence, including CCTV footage and phone records, homicide detectives arrested Bayley.

“After investigators informed (Bayley) of the evidence implicating him, he made admissions,” the police summary stated.

“(Bayley) stated that it was due to the argument that he had had earlier in the night with his girlfriend, that (Bayley) had an angry and aggressive demeanour which he transferred onto the deceased.”

Yesterday, Bayley pleaded not guilty to one count of murder and two counts of rape.

He pleaded guilty to one charge of rape.

EDITED RECORD OF INTERVIEW WITH ADRIAN ERNEST BAYLEY TENDERED TO COURT 

Adrian Ernest Bayley

BAYLEY: You know what? I hope I never get out, because you know why I hope that, because then no one else ever has to be hurt because someone hurts me. I don’t deal with – with hurt very well. You know it wasn’t really my intention to hurt her, you know that? When we conversed, I swear to you man – I swear to I’d – I’d just – I spoke to her and she looked – she looked distraught. Does that make sense?

DETECTIVE:Yeah it does.

BAYLEY:She didn’t look happy.

DETECTIVE:Yeah it does.

BAYLEY:And I spoke to – I spoke to hear, you now and said, look, I’ll just – I’ll – I’ll help you, you know. That’s what I said to her and she was like fu… anyway it doesn’t matter. She flipped me off and that made me angry, because I was trying to do a nice thing. You know that?

DETECTIVE: Yeah yeah.

BAYLEY: She looked distraught.

BAYLEY:She looked distraught, you know. She looked like she was lost … always try to do the right thing some – you know, most of the time and I didn’t take well to her response, you know. I just don’t wanna go through it in detail. That – I can’t.

DETECTIVE: What happened to Jill?

BAYLEY:They should have the death penalty for people like me.

DETECTIVE:I can’t tell you what’s gonna happen.

BAYLEY:No well – that’s what I hope.

DETECTIVE:So you said she fobbed you off and you got angry. Tell me what happened then?

BAYLEY:Oh I just got pissed off and I actually walked off and she followed. I actually walked in front of her and she followed.

DETECTIVE:Yep.

BAYLEY:And it just got worse.

DETECTIVE:Tell me what happened.

BAYLEY:(Starts to cry) … like a big sissy man.

BAYLEY:I wanna do the right thing. It’s not fair on any of this to – it’s not fair of any of this stuff to have happened, let alone her family and stuff too.

DETECTIVE: Yeah.

BAYLEY:Not knowing.

DETECTIVE:Would you be willing to come with me and show me?

BAYLEY:I’ll try. I’ll do my best man.

DETECTIVE:I appreciate that.

BAYLEY:I’m not sure how to get there.

BAYLEY:I know what I’m saying to you. It’s not fair for this to have happened, and it’s not fair on her family and its not fair on them not knowing. It’s not fair.

DETECTIVE:Um. I understand why you don’t want to go into the detail. I understand that totally. Um how – how did she die?

BAYLEY: (Starts to cry). I strangled her.

DETECTIVE:Sorry?

BAYLEY: (Continues to cry). What have I done? What have I done man?

DETECTIVE:And where did that happen?

BAYLEY:On Hope Street.

DETECTIVE:How did she come to get in the laneway?

BAYLEY:we – we walked past it.

DETECTIVE:yeah

BAYLEY:That far down Hope St. I didn’t take her from the street, or – you know?

DETECTIVE: Yeah and then?

BAYLEY:And we were just talking you know? We weren’t – there was no argument, there was no – it was just talking. And then um …

DETECTIVE:Alright.

BAYLEY:I was just walking ahead of her and we’d already interacted on Sydney Rd, and that’s when she rang her brother. She was actually telling me about her father.

DETECTIVE:Right

BAYLEY:You know? And I was just – I was trying to be nice and – she kept going from being nice to nasty, to nice, to – you know what I mean?

DETECTIVE:Yep.

BAYLEY:And it just sort of ended up in the alley. I cant remember yeah, you know what I mean, 100 per cent, like how it ended up. We were just sort of – we were standing there.

DETECTIVE: Um how did you – how did you strangle her?

BAYLEY:With my hands.

DETECTIVE:With your hands. And once that had happened, what did you do?

(interview interrupted by knock at door, then resumes)

BAYLEY:I didn’t run.

DETECTIVE:You didn’t run?

BAYLEY:(starts to cry) That’s not it man. I actually apologised.

DETECTIVE:To her?

BAYLEY:But I didn’t run. I didn’t – didn’t know what to do. It’s a horrible feeling man.

DETECTIVE: Yeah.

BAYLEY:I can’t imagine how – how she felt, but I know how I felt. It’s not nice man, its not nice. And all I thought was what have I done? That’s all I thought. That was the thought in my head, what have I done after I said sorry. I didn’t know what else to say, man. I don’t know what else to say.

DETECTIVE:And what happened to her belongings?

BAYLEY:The phone I smashed. Just the other stuff I threw.

DETECTIVE:You walk to the side, you get the shovel. Tell me what you do.

BAYLEY:I cried man, and I dug a hole.

DETECTIVE:Yeah

BAYLEY: I cried man, And I didn’t cry for me, you need to understand that. I didn’t cry for me, just like I’m not crying for me now.

Jill Meagher

TIMELINE

Saturday September 22, 2012

  • 1.30am: Jill Meagher leaves Bar Etiquette in Sydney Rd, Brunswick, in Melbourne’s inner-north to walk home. CCTV from the Dutchess Boutique captures both Ms Meagher and Adrian Bayley walking past.
  • 1.38am: Mr Bayley allegedly grabs Ms Meagher and drags her into a nearby laneway off Hope St.
  • 1.40am – 1.45am: Neighbours hear a woman yelling from laneway. After a few minutes the yelling stops.
  • 2am: Tom Meagher tries calling his wife’s mobile phone.
  • 4am: Mr Meagher leaves his home in Lux Way – not far from the scene – to go and look for his wife.
  • 4.22am: It is alleged that having gone home to Coburg in Melbourne’s northern suburbs for a shovel, Mr Bayley returns in his white Holden Astra.
  • 4.26am: Car allegedly drives off with Ms Meagher’s body in the boot.
  • 6am: After continuing to call his wife’s phone all night without luck, Mr Meagher reports her missing.

Sunday September 23

  • 12.30pm: A Facebook page is set up in the hope somebody saw Ms Meagher.
  • 3.15pm: Police release public call for information about Ms Meagher’s disappearance.

Monday September 24

  • 6.30am: Ms Meagher’s handbag found in lane off Hope St. Police believe it was planted the day before.
  • 8.50am: Homicide squad takes over the case.
  • 1.45pm: Forensic officers recover evidence from the lane way. Detectives interview Mr Meagher.

Tuesday September 25

  • 12.30pm: Forensic police search the Meagher home and take away their car and bags of items for testing.
  • 3.55pm: Police release footage from the Dutchess Boutique of Ms Meagher and a man in a blue hoodie.
  • 6.15pm: Police return to the Meagher home and search again.

Thursday September 27

  • 2.30pm: Mr Bayley arrested in Coburg.
  • 3.58pm: Police interview with Mr Bayley begins.
  • 10pm: Interview suspended while police travel to a site allegedly nominated by Mr Bayley.

Friday September 28

  • 3am: Mr Bayley remanded at an out-of-sessions hearing after being charged with murder.
  • 4am: Ms Meagher’s body is taken away by coronial staff after being recovered from a shallow grave at the side of Black Hill Rd in Gisborne South, north of Melbourne.
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