Murderer Keli Lane Update SENTENCED TO AT LEAST 13 YEARS


UPDATE high court appeal fails

Keli Lane loses High Court application to appeal against conviction for murdering baby Tegan

Fri 15 Aug 2014, 1:19pm

Former water polo champion Keli Lane has lost her application to the High Court to appeal against her conviction for murdering her baby.

Lane is serving a minimum sentence of 13 years and five months after being found guilty of killing her two-day-old daughter Tegan in 1996.

Her maximum sentence is 18 years.

She has always maintained she gave the child to a man with whom she had a brief and secret affair. Tegan’s body has never been found.

Lane applied for leave to appeal in the High Court after the Supreme Court upheld her conviction in late 2013.

Her barrister Winston Terracini today told a two-judge panel in the High Court an alternative count of manslaughter should have been open to the jury, as there was no evidence about how Tegan died.

“There was a viable case of manslaughter,” Mr Terracini said.

“The jury should have been at least told … there was an alternative verdict.

“There’s no evidentiary basis got how the deceased was killed.”

But the High Court judges noted the strength of the prosecution case was in part due to the fact that no arrangement was made for the baby to be placed in care after her birth.

They pointed out that Lane arrived at her family’s home soon after giving birth, and after a short time an act “dangerous or contrary to the law” may have occurred.

Tegan’s body has never been found and Lane has always maintained she gave the baby to the biological father, a man she called Andrew Norris or Morris, with whom she had an affair.

But prosecutors maintained Lane killed Tegan after leaving Auburn Hospital, in western Sydney, two days after giving birth.

The crown’s case was that she hid five pregnancies and did not want the responsibility of a child because of her ambition to compete in the 2000 Olympics.

Lane had two terminations as a teenager and kept three pregnancies and births secret from family and friends, giving up two children for adoption, the court heard.

Lane’s earliest release date will be in May 2024.

Keli Lane will serve at least 13 years and five months for murder of tegan, plus four years and seven months on parole…MORE TO COME

Keli Lane will serve at least 13 years and five months for murder of tegan, plus four years and seven months on parole

Sentencing today 15/04/11

In court as we speak she is being sentenced, been talking for nearly an hour so far in handing down term…stay tuned

Update tonight Sunday 3rd April 2011

Just watched the disgusting story on Channel 7 tonight. How convoluted was that? Master Manipulator, I hope someone in the know who has her confidence now gets greedy and breaks her confidence  and comes forward with information on her remains etc!
Bloody Christopher Murphy, solicitor to the crooks and crims, all for his own huge ego.Google and see the type of people he has represented…I will post the video of this story soon!

Keli Lane‘s sentencing hearing was today adjourned until next Friday

FORMER water polo champion and convicted murderer Keli Lane intended to kill her newborn baby rather than cause her really serious harm, a Sydney judge has been told.

Reality sinks in for baby killer Keli Lane. Justice for Tegan at last

Crown prosecutor Mark Tedeschi QC today in the NSW Supreme Court disputed the defence’s “serious harm” contention, saying the “only rational conclusion” was that Lane intended to kill two-day-old Tegan.

Lane, 36, appeared on the verge of tears throughout the hearing, which was attended by her mother, brother and other supporters.

Last December, a jury found Lane guilty of murdering her newborn second child on September 14, 1996, after they left Auburn hospital.

Lane had hidden three pregnancies, secretly adopting out her first and third babies.

Tegan’s body has never been found.

Referring to issues to be resolved by Justice Anthony Whealy, Mr Tedeschi said the judge may find Lane’s pre-meditation only occurred on the day of the killing.

He also handed up to the judge a list showing sentencing practices in 1996, when the murder occurred.

“The sentencing of people for homicide generally was much more lenient to the offender than today,” he noted during his sentencing submission in the packed courtroom.

At one stage, Justice Whealy noted the jury had found Lane guilty, adding “whatever views I may have had about the strength of the crown case must take second place to the jury verdict”.

The sentencing hearing was adjourned to next Friday to enable a defence psychiatrist to respond to a psychiatric report tendered by the Crown.

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You don’t know my dad: Keli Lane’s secret fear


You don’t know my dad: Keli Lane’s secret fear

Under pressure ... Keli Lane (middle) arrives for the first day of her trial in August.

IN MANY ways, Keli Lane was her father’s daughter. Fit, charismatic and sociable, she was following in his footsteps as a gifted athlete. But when her life came crashing down around her, she felt utterly alone.

Police interviews and phone taps released last week shed new light on the extent of the psychological pressure Lane was under. She herself suggested her fate could have been so different if only she hadn’t been too ashamed to seek support from those closest to her.

”This whole, this whole mess is because I didn’t have a thick skin, because I couldn’t ask anyone for help, because I couldn’t stand the embarrassment,” she told her then husband in an intercepted phone call in August 2004.

Keli's father Robert (middle) with fellow champion surfers Mick Dooley and Nat Young at Bondi Beach in 1963.

After a 17-week trial, Lane, 35, was convicted last Monday of the murder of her two-day-old daughter Tegan, who was last seen alive at Auburn Hospital on September 14, 1996.

While the most obvious mystery of the case relates to the last hours of Tegan’s life, another is how Lane’s father, a former police officer and trained observer of human nature, had no idea his daughter had given birth to Tegan and two other children – who were given up for adoption – while under his watchful eye.

On the day Keli was born Robert Lane was so thrilled he shouted the entire Steyne Hotel, and filled the hospital maternity ward with flowers.

The father and daughter outside Westmead Coroners Court in 2005.

Mr Lane was a permanent fixture alongside his daughter as revelations about her hidden pregnancies kept coming during the coronial inquest at Westmead Coroners Court in 2005. Regularly linking arms with his daughter or grasping her hand, he told the inquest he believed Tegan was alive. ”I believe the version Keli has given but I’m not certain of the identity of the people involved.” After she was committed to stand trial last year, Mr Lane stood by his daughter, pledging to forfeit $30,000 if she breached her bail conditions.

Throughout the trial, he has helped shelter Lane’s daughter, now 9, from any news of the proceedings or charges against her mother.

Even on the day of the conviction, Mr Lane was not present in court as he was taking care of his granddaughter at their Fairlight home, according to Lane’s lawyer, Ben Archbold.

And yet police phone intercepts and interviews made public at Lane’s trial demonstrate how terrified she was of him finding out about the pregnancies, the missing child and the police investigation – so much so that she feared he might take away the daughter she gave birth to in 2001 and kept.

In a 2004 police interview, Lane told detectives: ”There’s no way, if my parents found out, that they’ll let me keep her … You don’t know my dad. Can you imagine what he will do?”

Mr Lane did not grant The Sun-Herald’s request for an interview.

A family friend, who refused to be named, said Lane had grown up in ”constant fear” of her disciplinarian father. ”Keli and her brother Morgan were petrified of their dad … She was so scared of failing him, whether it be at school, in sport, anything.”

Mr Lane was an outstanding surfer from Manly in the early days of the sport in Australia. In the 1960s, he, Glynn Ritchie and Nipper Williams – all Manly locals – were known as the ”Bower Boys” because they surfed the reef break at Fairy Bower.

Lane came third to Nat Young and Mick Dooley in the inaugural Australian championships at Bondi Beach in 1963. He was also a talented rugby player, turning out for Manly in the late 1960s and 1970s. In 1981-82 he became the team’s coach. Alan Jones took the helm the following season; Mr Lane returned to the position in 1986-87.

Professionally, he was also rising through the ranks as a career-driven detective at Manly police station. Former player Fred Whiteman described Mr Lane – or ”Moose” as he was then known – as a ”passionate, loyal Manly-ite” who was well respected throughout the area.

Another former club associate described Mr Lane’s coaching style as ”no-nonsense”. The player, who preferred not to be named, said: ”Lane was a real old-style head-kicker. He was a rough, tough copper and that was reflected in his coaching style.”

By the early 1990s, Mr Lane had climbed to the top of Manly’s social ladder. Living in Fairlight, he and his wife Sandra were regular fixtures at parties and functions – and when it came to discussing the children with acquaintances over a glass of champagne the Lanes spoke proudly of the promising futures of Keli and Morgan.

Like her father, Keli loved sport. She was a good swimmer and had found her niche playing water polo. As a member of the Balmain Water Polo Club in the mid-1990s, she was suddenly knocking on the door of the national team, which in turn put her in contention to represent Australia at the 2000 Olympics.

To her father’s delight, she trained hard. But unbeknown to him, she also partied hard, and she never had a problem attracting men.

Having children would have destroyed her Olympic dream, so when she became pregnant five times between 1992 and 1999, Lane addressed the problem clinically. Her first two pregnancies were terminated. Two babies were secretly adopted out, in 1995 and 1999. In between those two births, Lane delivered Tegan on September 12, 1996.

Mother and daughter were discharged from Auburn Hospital two days later. Within hours, Lane was dancing at a friend’s wedding. Tegan had vanished forever.

It took some time for detective senior constables Richard Gaut and Bradley Edgerton to comprehend how Lane could possibly have disguised her pregnancies and births from friends, family and even her long-term lover, footballer Duncan Gillies. Nor did it help that the unco-operative woman under investigation just happened to be the daughter of a renowned retired sergeant who had been based at their station in Manly.

Phone taps soon revealed how aware Lane was of having made ”stupid choices”. They also demonstrated how paralysed she felt by the prospect of telling her father the truth and bringing shame on the family name. The intercepts suggested she had already felt the sting of his disapproval in 2001 when she told him she was pregnant with the daughter she kept.

After a friend tried to console Lane in January 2004, reassuring her that her parents loved her, Lane replied: ”But I don’t think they will after this, do you know what I mean?

I remember dad saying after telling him I was pregnant with [the daughter in 2001], ‘Oh, you can’t top this one Keli,’ and that’s all I keep hearing.”

After finally telling her fiance the truth – weeks before their wedding – Lane informed him how furious her parents were likely to be: ”I’ll cop whatever they say to me … they can call me a slut or a moron or a dickhead or whatever.”

Once Keli’s mother heard the news, she warned that her husband’s reaction would be severe – even advising Lane to keep her young daughter away from the fallout. ”You’ve got to be telling the absolute truth. I’m telling you, because he’ll know how to find out things that you wouldn’t believe.”

Lane said: ”He’s not going to hurt me or anything.”

Her mother said: ”He’s not going to hurt you but he’s going to blow up. You know that, don’t you?”

The phone taps portray a vulnerable woman whose fate might have been different had she felt she could dare to be honest.

”It all seems to be out of my hands, like I really don’t have any choices,” she told her husband over the phone.

”I didn’t have any choices then. I’ve got no choices now.”

 

You don't know my dad: Keli Lane's secret fear


You don’t know my dad: Keli Lane’s secret fear

Under pressure ... Keli Lane (middle) arrives for the first day of her trial in August.

IN MANY ways, Keli Lane was her father’s daughter. Fit, charismatic and sociable, she was following in his footsteps as a gifted athlete. But when her life came crashing down around her, she felt utterly alone.

Police interviews and phone taps released last week shed new light on the extent of the psychological pressure Lane was under. She herself suggested her fate could have been so different if only she hadn’t been too ashamed to seek support from those closest to her.

”This whole, this whole mess is because I didn’t have a thick skin, because I couldn’t ask anyone for help, because I couldn’t stand the embarrassment,” she told her then husband in an intercepted phone call in August 2004.

Keli's father Robert (middle) with fellow champion surfers Mick Dooley and Nat Young at Bondi Beach in 1963.

After a 17-week trial, Lane, 35, was convicted last Monday of the murder of her two-day-old daughter Tegan, who was last seen alive at Auburn Hospital on September 14, 1996.

While the most obvious mystery of the case relates to the last hours of Tegan’s life, another is how Lane’s father, a former police officer and trained observer of human nature, had no idea his daughter had given birth to Tegan and two other children – who were given up for adoption – while under his watchful eye.

On the day Keli was born Robert Lane was so thrilled he shouted the entire Steyne Hotel, and filled the hospital maternity ward with flowers.

The father and daughter outside Westmead Coroners Court in 2005.

Mr Lane was a permanent fixture alongside his daughter as revelations about her hidden pregnancies kept coming during the coronial inquest at Westmead Coroners Court in 2005. Regularly linking arms with his daughter or grasping her hand, he told the inquest he believed Tegan was alive. ”I believe the version Keli has given but I’m not certain of the identity of the people involved.” After she was committed to stand trial last year, Mr Lane stood by his daughter, pledging to forfeit $30,000 if she breached her bail conditions.

Throughout the trial, he has helped shelter Lane’s daughter, now 9, from any news of the proceedings or charges against her mother.

Even on the day of the conviction, Mr Lane was not present in court as he was taking care of his granddaughter at their Fairlight home, according to Lane’s lawyer, Ben Archbold.

And yet police phone intercepts and interviews made public at Lane’s trial demonstrate how terrified she was of him finding out about the pregnancies, the missing child and the police investigation – so much so that she feared he might take away the daughter she gave birth to in 2001 and kept.

In a 2004 police interview, Lane told detectives: ”There’s no way, if my parents found out, that they’ll let me keep her … You don’t know my dad. Can you imagine what he will do?”

Mr Lane did not grant The Sun-Herald’s request for an interview.

A family friend, who refused to be named, said Lane had grown up in ”constant fear” of her disciplinarian father. ”Keli and her brother Morgan were petrified of their dad … She was so scared of failing him, whether it be at school, in sport, anything.”

Mr Lane was an outstanding surfer from Manly in the early days of the sport in Australia. In the 1960s, he, Glynn Ritchie and Nipper Williams – all Manly locals – were known as the ”Bower Boys” because they surfed the reef break at Fairy Bower.

Lane came third to Nat Young and Mick Dooley in the inaugural Australian championships at Bondi Beach in 1963. He was also a talented rugby player, turning out for Manly in the late 1960s and 1970s. In 1981-82 he became the team’s coach. Alan Jones took the helm the following season; Mr Lane returned to the position in 1986-87.

Professionally, he was also rising through the ranks as a career-driven detective at Manly police station. Former player Fred Whiteman described Mr Lane – or ”Moose” as he was then known – as a ”passionate, loyal Manly-ite” who was well respected throughout the area.

Another former club associate described Mr Lane’s coaching style as ”no-nonsense”. The player, who preferred not to be named, said: ”Lane was a real old-style head-kicker. He was a rough, tough copper and that was reflected in his coaching style.”

By the early 1990s, Mr Lane had climbed to the top of Manly’s social ladder. Living in Fairlight, he and his wife Sandra were regular fixtures at parties and functions – and when it came to discussing the children with acquaintances over a glass of champagne the Lanes spoke proudly of the promising futures of Keli and Morgan.

Like her father, Keli loved sport. She was a good swimmer and had found her niche playing water polo. As a member of the Balmain Water Polo Club in the mid-1990s, she was suddenly knocking on the door of the national team, which in turn put her in contention to represent Australia at the 2000 Olympics.

To her father’s delight, she trained hard. But unbeknown to him, she also partied hard, and she never had a problem attracting men.

Having children would have destroyed her Olympic dream, so when she became pregnant five times between 1992 and 1999, Lane addressed the problem clinically. Her first two pregnancies were terminated. Two babies were secretly adopted out, in 1995 and 1999. In between those two births, Lane delivered Tegan on September 12, 1996.

Mother and daughter were discharged from Auburn Hospital two days later. Within hours, Lane was dancing at a friend’s wedding. Tegan had vanished forever.

It took some time for detective senior constables Richard Gaut and Bradley Edgerton to comprehend how Lane could possibly have disguised her pregnancies and births from friends, family and even her long-term lover, footballer Duncan Gillies. Nor did it help that the unco-operative woman under investigation just happened to be the daughter of a renowned retired sergeant who had been based at their station in Manly.

Phone taps soon revealed how aware Lane was of having made ”stupid choices”. They also demonstrated how paralysed she felt by the prospect of telling her father the truth and bringing shame on the family name. The intercepts suggested she had already felt the sting of his disapproval in 2001 when she told him she was pregnant with the daughter she kept.

After a friend tried to console Lane in January 2004, reassuring her that her parents loved her, Lane replied: ”But I don’t think they will after this, do you know what I mean?

I remember dad saying after telling him I was pregnant with [the daughter in 2001], ‘Oh, you can’t top this one Keli,’ and that’s all I keep hearing.”

After finally telling her fiance the truth – weeks before their wedding – Lane informed him how furious her parents were likely to be: ”I’ll cop whatever they say to me … they can call me a slut or a moron or a dickhead or whatever.”

Once Keli’s mother heard the news, she warned that her husband’s reaction would be severe – even advising Lane to keep her young daughter away from the fallout. ”You’ve got to be telling the absolute truth. I’m telling you, because he’ll know how to find out things that you wouldn’t believe.”

Lane said: ”He’s not going to hurt me or anything.”

Her mother said: ”He’s not going to hurt you but he’s going to blow up. You know that, don’t you?”

The phone taps portray a vulnerable woman whose fate might have been different had she felt she could dare to be honest.

”It all seems to be out of my hands, like I really don’t have any choices,” she told her husband over the phone.

”I didn’t have any choices then. I’ve got no choices now.”

 

Keli Lane Media Stuff


Hi all this will contain stuff that was unavailable while the Keli Lane  trial was on as I get my hands on it….cheers

Keli spends first night in Jail

Police Interviews with Keli

Tapped phone call, Keli to her mum

Tapped phone call, Keli to ex Husband (press play below)

Tegan's killer, Keli Lane in Jail


This woman was so convinced she was going to be walking out of that court a free woman, she had the hair, all coloured golden blonde, the legs all tanned up, red stilettos??????  I assume all ready for the limelight of media attention on the steps afterwards.Instead she was within minutes of the verdict being carted out the back into a prison van on her way to jail! The irony is significant. Right to the very end appearances meant everything to Keli Lane. Well enjoy your prison greens the only outfit you will ever wear from this day forward. Child Killers are despised in jail.Mothers even worse, so good luck in there, you will need it Keli

Reality sets in for baby killer Keli Lane. Justice at last for Tegan

SECONDS after a Sydney jury found she had murdered her newborn daughter, former water polo champion and Olympic aspirant Keli Lane screamed “oh, no”, and collapsed.

Her anguished cry was echoed by her sobbing mother, Sandra Lane, while many distressed jurors had tears in their eyes.

Almost everyone in the crowded NSW Supreme Court room yesterday seemed affected by the raw emotion before Justice Anthony Whealy adjourned the case so Lane could get medical help from a paramedic.

Soon after, Lane was taken from the court in handcuffs and put into a prison van as a convicted killer.

Lane, 35, had denied murdering two-day-old Tegan Lane on September 14, 1996, after they left Auburn Hospital in Sydney.

She claimed she handed the infant over to the baby’s father but, despite national searches, police found no trace of him or of Tegan.

Lane was accused of murdering the infant and secretly adopting out two other babies so as not to dent her “golden girl” image.

The jury of six women and six men had been deliberating for a week without a verdict, when the judge gave them the option of a majority 11-1 decision yesterday.

The jury of six women and six men had been deliberating for a week without a verdict, when the judge gave them the option of a majority 11-1 decision yesterday.

Earlier, he had delayed calling them into court to answer questions after being told “some emotion is being experienced in the jury room”.

When the court resumed after the verdict and Lane’s collapse, she looked shell-shocked but sat quietly in the dock beside her solicitor, who had her arm around her.

Justice Whealy refused to continue her bail, saying while he had “great sympathy” for Lane, it would be “a very unfair result” to grant bail.

Lane was also found guilty of three counts of making a false statement on oath in relation to documents dealing with her adopting out the two other babies.

Outside court, John Borovnik – the Department of Community Services worker who first reported Tegan missing – said justice had been done.

“Tegan never had a voice, it’s in memory of Tegan,” he said.

Mr Borovnik said all Lane could come up with was a statement saying Tegan was alive and happy.

“If she is alive and well, where is she?” he asked. Crown prosecutor Mark Tedeschi, QC, contended Lane secretly hid her three pregnancies and births because she had not wanted to be saddled with the responsibility of children.

As well as being motivated by her Olympic ambitions, her career and social life, Lane had “an overwhelming fear of rejection” by family and friends if they knew of her pregnancies.

Mr Tedeschi maintained Lane had never intended taking any of her babies home but wanted a “permanent” solution.

While he could not say how she murdered Tegan or how she disposed of her body, Mr Tedeschi urged jurors to reject”pigs might fly” theories about the infant’s fate.

Her claim about handing Tegan over to the infant’s father, a secret short-term lover, and the man’s live-in partner was “inherently unbelievable”.

In his directions to the jurors, Justice Whealy said they must acquit Lane if there was a reasonable possibility Tegan was alive or was handed over to someone else.

But he also said if they were satisfied beyond reasonable doubt that Lane, by a deliberate act, caused the death of Tegan and it was done with intent to kill her, she should be found guilty.

Sentencing submissions will be heard on February 25.