Tony Mokbel Lackey to claim Million dollar Reward!


Tony Mokbel Lackey to claim Million dollar Reward! It is unbelievable, but a former lackey for Fat Tony who turned rat to save his own ass is also in line for a $1,000,000 reward for spilling the beans on the The Company, Mokbels Drug business, the books, safe houses, storage units, money stashes etc. Let me say this, you cannot spend a million bucks six feet under, this bloke wont get a goods night sleep for the rest of his uncertain life if he gets this money (actually even if he doesn’t) revenge is best served cold, so move to the moon I reckon code 3030

The famous wig mugshot on capturing "Fat Tony" Mokbel

THE drug dealer who dobbed in crime boss Tony Mokbel is likely to be paid Victoria’s first $1 million reward.

He has already escaped being charged over his prominent role in Mokbel’s gang, which included helping Mokbel organise a false passport to flee Australia.

But veteran underworld figure Billy Longley yesterday warned the “grass” who fingered Mokbel would have to keep looking over his shoulder for the rest of his life.

“A lot of people have gone to jail because of him, including Mokbel,” Mr Longley said.

“Such people have long memories and will want revenge.”

The previous biggest amount paid out by Victoria Police was a $100,000 reward in 1991.

There are nine other $1 million rewards up for grabs at present.

The police informer in the Mokbel case, codenamed 3030, was a key member of Mokbel’s drug syndicate, known as The Company, as well as a drug user.

He turned on Mokbel, and his other fellow gang members, soon after Victoria Police offered the $1 million bounty to find Mokbel in April 2007.

Purana gangland killing taskforce detectives persuaded 3030 to work for them inside The Company.

Information provided by 3030 resulted in multiple arrests of members of The Company, including Mokbel in Greece on June 5, 2007.

The informer is a significant step closer to being paid the $1 million, as Mokbel is due in court tomorrow for a pre-sentence hearing.

Mokbel pleaded guilty in April to drug charges relating to his masterminding The Company while on the run in Victoria and Greece.

A Victoria Police spokesman yesterday confirmed the process of deciding on the reward would begin at the end of a 28-day appeal period after Mokbel’s sentencing.

Supreme Court judge Justice Betty King already has described 3030’s assistance to police as “invaluable”.

And police have paid tribute to 3030, saying he played a vital role in helping them to locate and arrest Mokbel.

Apart from providing telephone numbers so police could bug phones of Company members, including Mokbel’s, 3030 helped identify people in The Company’s business as well as the houses, hotels and storages they were using.

Information provided to Purana by 3030 enabled officers to put recording and listening devices in The Company’s cars, houses and storages, as well as bug phones.

He also assisted police in introducing undercover operatives into The Company.

With 3030’s co-operation, Purana detectives were able to find Mokbel and arrest nine of The Company gang members in Melbourne on the same day Mokbel was picked up in Greece.

Raids on Victorian properties associated with The Company led to the seizure of amphetamines, cocaine, precursor chemicals used to make amphetamines, drug-making equipment valued at more than $500,000, and almost $800,000 in cash.

The informer also helped police to identify properties The Company bought with drug money, which enabled their seizure.

Lawyers acting for Joseph Mansour, one of The Company members convicted as a result of 3030 turning police informer, queried the lack of charges against 3030.

In jailing Mansour for 10 years, Justice King said: “Your counsel referred to the fact 3030 is not charged in respect of these activities, which is not surprising, as a number of these activities that he undertook were at the behest of the police to gather evidence.

“His assistance in identifying and breaking this very large conspiracy could be described as invaluable.”

5 thoughts on “Tony Mokbel Lackey to claim Million dollar Reward!

  1. So in delaying this guy’s reward payout ~ the ‘officials’ who have their own corrupt element will leak the guys name and location ~ the guy will get found ~ and will escape facing any further charges upon his death. Saves the government $1 million, gives Mokbel’s crew a chance at enacting revenge.

    Then, the police will have another case, cause or reason to tail Mokbel’s crew, they will convince another one of them to turn informer, they will offer him a reward extend it and the same story will play out. Again and again and again.

    And, in the midst of all this some innocent people will get caught up and severely damaged, and the police, who are engaged to preserve public order, will find some friggin justification ~ and there clearly is none ~ but so too are the days of our lives.

    Vigilante mentality will escalate, and this will be comprised mainly of victims that don’t get looked after by either the criminal element or the alleged ‘law enforcement’ operatives who, half the time are simply licensed thugs operating in the name of the government that appointed them.

    Time for a new sandwich composition, I think ~ I’d like to expose some of the licensed thugs, they go over and above the call of duty and justify it as part of authenticating their undercover role.

    Pisses me off !!!

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  2. If it is against the law to profit from a crime eg writing a book about a crime committed by yourself etc.How can this person who is a criminal involved in the same gang profit.
    Getting a reduced sentence for being a rat is one thing,but becoming a legitimate instant millionaire is wrong.I hope someone challenges this.
    As far as looking over his shoulder with a million dollars and international drug connections a new life overseas would not be too hard to imagine
    Max

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  3. max ~ he gets it on a technicality ~ although he may be part of the gang ~ he may not have a direct link to Mokbel and, the reward relates to Mokbel directly rather than any other part of the gang.

    If he was Mokbel’s right hand man, he wouldn’t qualify, as long as it was able to be proven.

    Quirky legislation :)

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  4. It’s a well-known problem with rewards to solve crimes: The people who have the info are rarely boy-scouts. Look at cocaine-trafficking former lawyer Andrew Fraser getting a fortune for helping nab Mr-vermin Peter Dupas. Don’t get me wrong, I’m thrilled they got peter, but cell-buddy jailhouse-lawyer Andrew Fraser aint exactly a saint. And for sharing a cell with this vermin, he gets to become rich! And get out of jail early, to boot! How lucky!

    Look, dunno the ethics offhand, but yes, this problem with rewards is a well-known one, and does cause angst.

    Also, I’ll mention that VicPol haven’t found rewards that useful. Of all the reward money on offer for unsolved crimes, most never gets paid, and probably never will.

    But look, if you deal drugs for money, you ought to expect that people may rat you out for bigger money. As they say, don’t expect honour among thieves. In the case of ideological crimes such as terrorism, I suspect sell-outs would be significantly rarer. And in the case of fraudsters and white-collar crooks, I’d say they’d likely be even more common than in drug crimes.

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  5. The other big problem with rewards in such situations is the obvious ability to corrupt the testimony of the one in line for the reward. If a conviction of the accused you’re testifying against will net you a million dollars, you’ve obviously got a million reasons to lie in order to get him or her convicted. This wasn’t a big issue in this particular case, as the reward was for information leading to mokbel’s capture, not conviction (I believe). But in cases where the reward hinges on conviction, it’s a blatant bribe of a witness! I never understood why this was considered acceptable. If an accused offered a reward for non-conviction, he’d no doubt be charged with obstruction of justice, I would think. :-O This needs changing. Rewards should not be based on conviction in cases where the would-be recipient is to testify.

    And next time a would-be-reward-recipient is to testify, how about having an accused offer a “reward for non-conviction” in order to make a statement of the warped nature of the system.

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