Richie Callendar on ‘Racings dirty little secret’

Richard Callander labelled it “racing’s dirty little secret”, the world of secret commissions and kickbacks in selling horses as he, Chris Waller’s racing manager Liam Prior and jockey Glyn Schofield faced stewards on Monday about the sale of Lil Caesar in November 2014.


Richard Callander is facing a charge by Racing NSW stewards
Jockey Glyn Schofield, media personality Richard Callander and Chris Waller’s racing manager Liam Prior have all been charged over the sale of Lil Caesar to Hong Kong.

Racing NSW stewards issued the charges on Friday after the trio attended an inquiry earlier this week.

Schofield is charged under Australian Rule of Racing 85C with having been involved in the negotiating of the sale of the racehorse Lil Caesar to Hong Kong interests.

As a licensed jockey, Schofield is not permitted to be involved in the buying, selling, trading or leasing of thoroughbred bloodstock.

Both Callander and Prior have been charged under AR175(a) with dishonest and/or fraudulent actions in connection with the disbursement of $60,000 of the sale proceeds of $200,000 from the sale.

The inquiry heard on Monday that Prior had allegedly received $24,000 from the sale, Schofield $10,000 as well as another $10,000 in commission from Hong Kong trainer Danny Shum and Callander, who had a 5 per cent share in the horse, over $30,000.

Callander had transferred $129,405.20 from the $200,000 sale to the Waller racing account to be paid to the other owners in the horse.

Earlier this month Schofield was charged by Racing Victoria stewards over the sale of the Brent Stanley-trained Equita to Hong Kong.

It has been alleged that Schofield received $290,000 from the buyer, retaining $20,000 with Stanley collecting $70,000 while the other owners were advised the horse had been sold for $200,000.

‘Racing’s dirty little secret’ revealed during inquiry into Hong Kong horse sale

February 22, 2016 – 10:57PM

Racing writer for The Sydney Morning Herald

Richard Callander. Photo: Getty Images

Richard Callander labelled it “racing’s dirty little secret”, the world of secret commissions and kickbacks in selling horses as he, Chris Waller‘s racing manager Liam Prior and jockey Glyn Schofield faced stewards on Monday about the sale of Lil Caesar in November 2014.

The difference between the invoice price of $200,000 on October 28 and the $140,000 the owners were told and paid in November 2014 was centre of the inquiry.

Callander told stewards he had been in racing his whole life and there are “backhands” and “commissions” paid in nearly every horse sale. “It happens every single day in racing in every sale,” he said.

It was agreed Callander invoiced Hong Kong trainer Danny Shum for $200,000 via Schofield for the horse, which Waller thought had limited ability. It has since won four races in Hong Kong. On October 28, Waller emailed Callander and Prior at 9.13am asking what price they had got for Lil Caesar. Callander said he did not reply because he did not know at that point. However, at 11.22am he emailed Schofield an invoice for $200,000, which was forwarded to Shum.

Callander said he was “protecting” the owners and trying to act in their best interests to keep them from having a bad experience in racing. He believed the price was $140,000, even though he invoiced for $200,000 he wasn’t expecting to get that much.  “I have grown up in racing and 200G doesn’t mean you are getting 200G,” Callander said. He was surprised when Schofield transferred $200,000 into his account on November 12, 2014.

The next day Schofield went to Callander’s house and was paid $10,000 in cash for “an amazing job” to get so much for the horse.

The jockey also admitted he received a $10,000 commission from Shum, 5 per cent of the deal, which had been paid to Schofield’s account along with the $200,000.

Callander was the managing owner and had 5 per cent of Lil Caesar. Once the horse was sold he moved $129,405.20 for 95 per cent of the horse into the Waller racing account, which was paid to the owners. “I made one error of judgement in not contacting the owners [at the time] and telling them we had got the bigger amount and asking how they would want the [extra] money dispensed,” Callander said. “I have contacted them all now [personally] and they have all been paid [their share of the extra $50,000].”

On top of the $10,000 given to Schofield, there was the missing $50,000 that it appears was split between Callander and Prior. Callander paid Prior $24,000 in five separate deposits. Prior admitted his actions appeared to be deceitful and dishonest. He had told the owners there was an offer of $130,000 that was negotiated up to $140,000. The inquiry was adjourned until a day to be fixed.


Inquiry over sale of horse to Hong Kong

Richard Callander fronted a stewards inquiry on Monday Richard Callander fronted a stewards inquiry on Monday Image: Getty

Racing media identity Richard Callander has admitted he kept a commission from the sale of a horse to Hong Kong but says money has since been paid to the other owners.

Callander, a presenter for former racing telecaster TVN, trainer Chris Waller’s racing manager Liam Prior and jockey Glyn Schofield appeared before Racing NSW stewards on Monday over the sale of Lil Caesar for an alleged $200,000, not $140,000 as the ownership group was told.

A part-owner of the horse, Callander transferred $129,405.20, $140,000 less his five per cent, into Waller Racing to be distributed among the other owners.

Prior told the inquiry he was paid $24,000 while Schofield received a $10,000 commission from trainer Danny Shum and another $10,000 with Callander receiving the rest.

The deal came to light when Racing Victoria stewards questioned Schofield over the sale of another unraced horse, Equita, previously trained by Brent Stanley.

Schofield arranged the sale of the colt to the Shum stable with the original owners told the price was $200,000.

RV stewards have charged both Stanley and Schofield over the sale with the jockey alleged to have received $20,000 and the trainer $70,000 from the sale of the colt for $290,000.

Schofield has told stewards in both states he was unaware of the ruled banning jockeys from involvement in such sales.

Both horses were unraced in Australia but have since gone on to win races in Hong Kong with Lil Caesar racing as Lucky Year and Equita as Dancing Flames.

No charges have yet been laid by stewards in NSW while a date for the Victorian inquiry is still to be set.


Stewards hear secret commission retained

BY Adrian Dunn – @adriandunn2
1 day ago Horse Racing

G1X presenter and reporter Richard Callander today told a Racing New South Wales Stewards inquiry it was never his intention to deceive the part-owners of Lil Caesar in the sale of the horse to Hong Kong, a sale managed by Callander.

Callander, Liam Prior, the racing manager for Chris Waller, and jockey Glyn Schofield have been called to assist stewards in the inquiry of the sale of Lil Caesar in October 2014.

Callander, the managing part-owner of Lil Caesar, and with a five per cent share in the horse, told the inquiry he was expecting to receive between $130,000 to $140,000 for the unraced Chris Waller-trained horse, not the $200,000 that was subsequently paid by Hong Kong trainer Danny Shum.

He said all the owners were happy to sell the horse for $140,000 as the belief was it had limited ability.

Callander, who has voluntarily stood down from G1X pending the outcome of the inquiry, said the “one mistake” he made was not contacting the owners when the $200,000 was paid – what he called a “windfall” – and to ask them if they were happy for him and Prior to retain the difference as their “commission” on the sale.

Callander said he made four payments of $5,000 and one payment of $4,000 to Prior in late 2014, a total of $24,000.

He told the stewards that commissions happened in racing transactions every day – from yearling sales to the sale of tried horses – within Australia and to Asia. He said “many, many trainers and jockeys” would now be questioned over the sale of horses. He described it as “racing’s dark little secret”.

Asked by Racing NSW chairman of stewards Ray Murrihy if his actions were “clearly deceitful and dishonest”, Callander replied: “I challenge your wording. I have dedicated my life to helping others. There was no intent to be deceitful, none at all.

“I have never done anything deceitful. That sits very harshly with me.”

Callander told Stewards he had subsequently spoken with and paid all the other 19 part-owners of the horse their share of the money that he and Prior had received.

The Racing NSW Stewards inquiry heard that Schofield received from Callander $10,000 as commission for his role in the sale. Schofield revealed he had also received a similar commission from the Hong Kong buyers.

Schofield told the inquiry that Callander gave the money as a gratuity for his role in the sale; Callander said Schofield asked for the money.

Schofield told the inquiry that he had a conversation at Warwick Farm races on October 15 (2014) with Callander about the possible sale of Lil Caesar to Hong Kong.

Callander denied the conversation took place at Warwick Farm. Schofield said, “I asked what price and he (Callander) was a bit vague.”

Schofield said he had also spoken with Prior about making inquiries with contacts he had in Hong Kong, including Shum, and later forwarded Shum a video clip and veterinary details about the horse. “I received a reply that he was quite keen and interested in the horse,” Schofield said.

He said he emailed Shum that the horse could be purchased for $200,000 and he (Schofield) would leave his commission to Shum. Schofield said he was later told by Shum that the Hong Kong buyers had agreed to give him five per cent commission – $10,000.

Schofield said Shum emailed him on October 28, 2014 requesting an invoice for the horse and he forwarded that request to Callander. He said on November 10 he received a bank transfer from Shum of $210,000, which included his $10,000 Hong Kong commission.

Two days later, Schofield said he transferred $200,000 to Callander’s bank account.

The inquiry heard that Waller sent an email to Callander and Prior at 9.13 am on October 28, 2014 asking what price Lil Caesar had been sold for.

Two hours later Callander sent Schofield an invoice, via email, for $200,000, which the jockey then forwarded to Shum.

Asked by Murrihy if he (Schofield) realised he had breached Rule 85 (c), which deals with a jockey not being allowed to be involved in the sale or the proceeds of any thoroughbred sold, Schofield said he did not know the rule existed. Schofield was charged earlier this year by Racing Victoria stewards for his part in the sale of the horse Equita to Hong Kong.

Prior told the inquiry he thought the sale of Lil Caesar would realise $140,000 and relayed that information to all the owners of October 28, 2014. Prior said he had received emails from part-owners Ben Weiss and Steve Sandor about the sale of the horse several times in the period following the sale asking for documentation.

The latest email exchange was on February 5 this year.

“I said the horse was moved on in good faith,” Prior said. “I meant that about selling the horse.”

Lil Caesar, who now races as Lucky Year in Hong Kong, has won four of seven starts for Shum, with earnings of $HK3.9 million ($AU700,000).

The inquiry was adjourned until a date to be fixed.


Callander stands down

BY Adrian Dunn – @adriandunn2
5 days ago Horse Racing

ADRIAN DUNN reports @adriandunn2

G1X journalist and presenter Richard Callander has voluntarily stood down from his G1X duties pending a Racing NSW inquiry into the sale of the racehorse Lil Caesar.

Callander was a part-owner of the unraced Lil Caesar when it was sold to Hong Kong interests last year.

Racing NSW chairman Ray Murrihy said the inquiry would continue at the Racing NSW offices in Sydney at 2pm on Monday.

Callander has been summoned to appear before stewards concerning “matters pertaining to the sale, in October 2014, to Hong Kong interests, of the racehorse Lil Caesar (now registered as Lucky Year).”

G1X CEO Simon Mackay said Callander’s offer to stand down has been accepted in the best interests of Callander and G1X.

“Without pre-empting the outcome of the the inquiry, G1X is a transparent organisation whose values are based on the highest standards of trust and integrity,” Mackay said.

“Richie has been a wonderful employee and ambassador of and for G1X, and it was he who volunteered taking a break from his employment with G1X in the best interests of the company.

“The inquiry provides him with the opportunity to express himself while assisting the stewards with their inquiry.”

Mackay said G1X would not make any further comment until the inquiry has been completed.

Callander was one of the first to sign with G1X.com.au when it was launched last August. He previously enjoyed a long media career with Channel 9, TVN and Winning Post.


FBAA slams Callander over ‘kickbacks’ comment

Richard Callander has put bloodstock agents offside Richard Callander has put bloodstock agents offside Image: Getty

The Federation of Bloodstock Agents Australia (FBAA) have slammed media personality Richard Callander over comments made during a recent Racing NSW Stewards’ inquiry.

Callander claimed that secret commissions and kickbacks for selling horses are racing’s ‘dark little secret’, something that the FBAA vehemently denies.

“It is very disappointing for a senior journalist to say during a stewards inquiry that kickbacks and secret commissions are racing’s ‘dark little secret’,” said FBAA President Adrian Hancock in a statement on their website.

“Those comments are a slur on the participants in the industry who operate professionally and honestly.”

Callander appeared before Racing NSW officials on Monday and admitted his involvement in the sale of a racehorse to Hong Kong for $200,000 despite telling the owners that the horse had been sold for $140,000.

The deal came to light when Racing Victoria stewards questioned rider Glyn Schofield over the sale of another unraced horse, Equita, previously trained by Brent Stanley.

“I note that no bloodstock agents are alleged to have been involved in this (Callander) sale or the recent transaction in Victoria involving trainer Brent Stanley let alone members of the FBAA,” said Hancock.

“The FBAA is dedicated to ensuring the integrity and fairness in all its horse dealings. We have been at the forefront of developing industry best practices for nearly 20 years.

“In addition to the industry Code of Conduct, the FBAA has a Code of Ethics to ensure our members can be trusted,” said Hancock.

“We urge any racing participant to get in contact with the FBAA if they are in need of advice about the possible sale of a racehorses, yearlings or broodmares.

“To this end we always recommend using the FBAA Contracts of Sale in any transaction. Each of our 26 accredited members will always act in the best interests of their clients and make sure that they are well looked after.”

Richard Callander is facing a charge by Racing NSW stewards Image: Getty
Jockey Glyn Schofield, media personality Richard Callander and Chris Waller’s racing manager Liam Prior have all been charged over the sale of Lil Caesar to Hong Kong.

Racing NSW stewards issued the charges on Friday after the trio attended an inquiry earlier this week.

Schofield is charged under Australian Rule of Racing 85C with having been involved in the negotiating of the sale of the racehorse Lil Caesar to Hong Kong interests.

As a licensed jockey, Schofield is not permitted to be involved in the buying, selling, trading or leasing of thoroughbred bloodstock.

Both Callander and Prior have been charged under AR175(a) with dishonest and/or fraudulent actions in connection with the disbursement of $60,000 of the sale proceeds of $200,000 from the sale.

The inquiry heard on Monday that Prior had allegedly received $24,000 from the sale, Schofield $10,000 as well as another $10,000 in commission from Hong Kong trainer Danny Shum and Callander, who had a 5 per cent share in the horse, over $30,000.

Callander had transferred $129,405.20 from the $200,000 sale to the Waller racing account to be paid to the other owners in the horse.

Earlier this month Schofield was charged by Racing Victoria stewards over the sale of the Brent Stanley-trained Equita to Hong Kong.

It has been alleged that Schofield received $290,000 from the buyer, retaining $20,000 with Stanley collecting $70,000 while the other owners were advised the horse had been sold for $200,000.

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Author: Robbo

I also love family, Photography, Cooking a great BBQ , Computers, Reading Crime Books, and solving crimes before the end of the show !

1 thought on “Richie Callendar on ‘Racings dirty little secret’”

  1. No need to have a bet for these blokes, they make plenty on the side according to one of Australia’s biggest racing personalities. They all know it is illegal but do it because every other bastard is too so he says…Not good enough

    Liked by 1 person

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